49

Recently I have found a lot of examples, most of them regards the C++ 98, anyways I have created my simple-array and a loop (codepad):

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
   string texts[] = {"Apple", "Banana", "Orange"};
   for( unsigned int a = 0; a < sizeof(texts); a = a + 1 )
   {
       cout << "value of a: " << texts[a] << endl;
   }

   return 0;
}

Output:

value of a: Apple
value of a: Banana
value of a: Orange

Segmentation fault

It's working fine, except the segmentation fault at the end.

My question is, does this array/loop through is done a good way? I am using C++ 11 so would like to be sure it fits the standards and couldnt be done a better way?

  • 4
    Just use std::array and its size() function. – chris Nov 27 '13 at 5:57
81

In C/C++ sizeof. always gives the number of bytes in the entire object, and arrays are treated as one object. Note: sizeof a pointer--to the first element of an array or to a single object--gives the size of the pointer, not the object(s) pointed to. Either way, sizeof does not give the number of elements in the array (its length). To get the length, you need to divide by the size of each element. eg.,

for( unsigned int a = 0; a < sizeof(texts)/sizeof(texts[0]); a = a + 1 )

As for doing it the C++11 way, the best way to do it is probably

for(const string &text : texts)
    cout << "value of text: " << text << endl;

This lets the compiler figure out how many iterations you need.

EDIT: as others have pointed out, std::array is preferred in C++11 over raw arrays; however, none of the other answers addressed why sizeof is failing the way it is, so I still think this is the better answer.

  • 7
    For added simplicity try for(auto & text : texts) – edA-qa mort-ora-y Nov 27 '13 at 7:51
  • @edA-qamort-ora-y or even better: for(auto &&text: texts) – CoffeeandCode Dec 9 '15 at 5:04
  • For the first way, won't this only work if all the strings are of the same length? – tmath Dec 3 '18 at 20:09
  • 1
    @tmath My math should work fine with OP's example because each string object is actually a constant size regardless of the length of the encapsulated string. In particular a string object is essentially just a struct with a pointer to the data, and a bit of other constant-size metadata. – Nicu Stiurca Feb 26 at 7:38
18
string texts[] = {"Apple", "Banana", "Orange"};
for( unsigned int a = 0; a < sizeof(texts); a = a + 1 )
{
    cout << "value of a: " << texts[a] << endl;
}

Nope. Totally a wrong way of iterating through an array. sizeof(texts) is not equal to the number of elements in the array!

The modern, C++11 ways would be to:

  • use std::array if you want an array whose size is known at compile-time; or
  • use std::vector if its size depends on runtime

Then use range-for when iterating.

#include <iostream>
#include <array>


int main() {
    std::array<std::string, 3> texts = {"Apple", "Banana", "Orange"};
    // ^ An array of 3 elements with the type std::string

    for(const auto& text : texts) {   // Range-for!
        std::cout << text << std::endl;
    }
}

Live example


You may ask, how is std::array better than the ol' C array? The answer is that it has the additional safety and features of other standard library containers, mostly closely resembling std::vector. Further, The answer is that it doesn't have the quirks of decaying to pointers and thus losing type information, which, once you lose the original array type, you can't use range-for or std::begin/end on it.

  • Note: they could still use the range-based loop with their original array. – juanchopanza Nov 27 '13 at 6:46
  • 3
    I don't like the std::array approach since I need to count the elements myself. In the traditional way the compiler creates the array of the right size for me. – edA-qa mort-ora-y Nov 27 '13 at 7:53
  • @edA-qamort-ora-y There's a work-around for that. – Mark Garcia Nov 27 '13 at 7:57
8

sizeof tells you the size of a thing, not the number of elements in it. A more C++11 way to do what you are doing would be:

#include <array>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::array<std::string, 3> texts { "Apple", "Banana", "Orange" };
    for (auto& text : texts) {
        std::cout << text << '\n';
    }
    return 0;
}

ideone demo: http://ideone.com/6xmSrn

  • 1
    hey, this is awesome! but should probably explain what it means and how it works. – cnst Apr 26 '16 at 23:18
2

Add a stopping value to the array:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
   string texts[] = {"Apple", "Banana", "Orange", ""};
   for( unsigned int a = 0; texts[a].length(); a = a + 1 )
   {
       cout << "value of a: " << texts[a] << endl;
   }

   return 0;
}
  • This is incorrect. texts[a].length() is the length of the word at index a. Not the length of the array. – htellez May 24 '18 at 21:07
  • 2
    @htellez Yes, that’s the point. The loop exits when it encounters a string with a length of zero. – Zenexer May 26 '18 at 1:56
  • Ah! I hadn't caught that. – htellez May 29 '18 at 22:19
  • The code work well thanks it solved my problem too, but how can string texts[] work to declaring arrays? why mine didn't? i'm using codeblock minGW 17.12 – Irvan Hilmi Dec 30 '18 at 14:31
1

sizeof(texts) on my system evaluated to 96: the number of bytes required for the array and its string instances.

As mentioned elsewhere, the sizeof(texts)/sizeof(texts[0]) would give the value of 3 you were expecting.

1

If you have a very short list of elements you would like to handle, you could use the std::initializer_list introduced in C++11 together with auto:

#include <iostream>

int main(int, char*[])
{
    for(const auto& ext : { ".slice", ".socket", ".service", ".target" })
        std::cout << "Handling *" << ext << " systemd files" << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
1

you need to understand difference between std::array::size and sizeof() operator. if you want loop to array elements in conventional way then you could use std::array::size. this will return number of elements in array but if you keen to use C++11 then prefer below code

for(const string &text : texts)
    cout << "value of text: " << text << endl;
0

How about:

#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <algorithm>

int main ()
{
    std::array<std::string, 3> text = {"Apple", "Banana", "Orange"};
    std::for_each(text.begin(), text.end(), [](std::string &string){ std::cout << string << "\n"; });

    return 0;
}

Compiles and works with C++ 11 and has no 'raw' looping :)

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