22

I m trying to use the node.js module xml2js

My code is quite simple:

function testparse(pathname, callback) {
    var parser = require('xml2js').Parser(),
        util = require('util'),
        fs = require('fs'),
    fs.readFile(pathname, function (err, data) {
        parser.parseString(data, function(err, result) {
            console.log('Complete result:');
            console.log(util.inspect(result, {depth: null})); //Work
            console.log('Try to access element:');
            console.log(result.smil.body); //Work
            console.log(result.smil.body.update); //Undefined
        });
    });
}

My xml file is as:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<smil>
    <head/>
    <body>
        <update /*some field*//>
        <stream name="name"/>
        <playlist /*some field*/>
            <video /*some field*//>
            <video /*some field*//>
            <video /*some field*//>
        </playlist>
    </body>
</smil>

The output give me:

Complete result:
{ smil:
    { head: [''],
      body:
        [ { update: [[Object]],
            stream: [[Object]],
            playlist: [[Object]] } ] } }
Try to access element:
[Object]
Undefined

I have succeed in accessing body by trying, but now I m stuck, is there a template or example of how xml2js output the parsed xml somewhere?

51

xml2js has an un-enviable task: convert XML to JSON in a way that can be reversed, without knowing the schema in advance. It seems obvious, at first:

<name>Fred</name> → { name: "Fred" }
<chacha /> → { chacha: null }

Easy so far, right? How about this, though?

<x><y>z</y><x>

Removing the human friendly names drives home the uncertainty facing xml2js. At first, you might think this is quite reasonable:

{ x: { y: "z" } }

Later, you trip over this XML text and realise your guessed-at schema was wrong:

<x><y>z</y><y>z2</y></x>

Uh oh. Maybe we should have used an array. At least all the members have the same tag:

{ x: [ "z", "z2" ] }

Inevitably, though, that turns out to be short-sighted:

<x><y>z</y><y>z2</y><m>n</m>happy</x>

Uh...

{ x: [ { y: "z" }, { y : "z2" }, { m: "n" }, "happy" ] }

... and then someone polishes you off with some attributes and XML namespaces.

The way to construct a more concise output schema feels obvious to you. You can infer details from the tag and attribute names. You understand it.

The library does not share that understanding.

If the library doesn't know the schema, it must either "use and abuse" arrays, extra layers of objects, special attribute names, or all three.

The only alternative is to employ a variable output schema. That keeps it simple at first, as we saw above, but you'll quickly find yourself writing a great deal of conditional code. Consider what happens if children with the same tag name are collapsed into a list, but only if there are more than one:

if (Array.isArray(x.y)) {
    processTheYChildren(x.y);
} else if (typeof(x.y) === 'object') {
    // only one child; construct an array on the fly because my converter didn't
    processTheYChildren([x.y]);
} else ...

TL;DR: it's harder than it looks. Read the Open311 JSON and XML Conversion page for details of other JSON-side representations. All "use and abuse" arrays, extra layers of objects, members with names that didn't appear in the original XML, or all three.

  • 3
    Great answer, even some mounth later. – DrakaSAN Feb 24 '14 at 8:42
  • 3
    Were you just messing with me when you put TL;DR at the END? :) – Sean Lynch Jan 13 '16 at 15:47
41

As xml2js' documentation states, you can configure the parser to not abuse of arrays, by setting the property explicitArray to false (important: it has to be a boolean value as the string "false" will just not work!)

Example:

var parser = new xml2js.Parser({explicitArray : false});

This way, you should be able to access your JSON properties in a much easier way. I hope this helps anyone.

  • Nice tip, thank you very much. – Mario Murrent Feb 20 '16 at 17:30
  • It worked like charm .. Thanks @Clint – Sumeet Gohil Feb 1 '17 at 8:29
  • 1
    If you use this, you now have to check if you've actually received an element or an array of elements. Otherwise, you could end up with a type disaster inside your code. – zigg Jul 10 '17 at 18:02
  • 2
    I have used this then it works: var Parser = require('xml2js-parser') var parser = new Parser({explicitArray:false, mergeAttrs : true}); – Rohit Luthra Dec 19 '17 at 13:42
  • thanks @Rohitluthra for mergeAttrs : true, saved me – Theophilus Omoregbee Mar 19 '18 at 21:55
6

The JSON that comes back isn't too JavaScript friendly. I've written a helper function that can make it easier to work with.

Be sure to read it before using it so that you understand what it does.

xml.parseString(xmlString, function(err, results){
    if(err) throw err

    results = cleanXML(results);
});

var cleanXML = function(xml){
    var keys = Object.keys(xml),
        o = 0, k = keys.length,
        node, value, singulars,
        l = -1, i = -1, s = -1, e = -1,
        isInt = /^-?\s*\d+$/,
        isDig = /^(-?\s*\d*\.?\d*)$/,
        radix = 10;

    for(; o < k; ++o){
        node = keys[o];

        if(xml[node] instanceof Array && xml[node].length === 1){
            xml[node] = xml[node][0];
        }

        if(xml[node] instanceof Object){
            value = Object.keys(xml[node]);

            if(value.length === 1){
                l = node.length;

                singulars = [
                    node.substring(0, l - 1),
                    node.substring(0, l - 3) + 'y'
                ];

                i = singulars.indexOf(value[0]);

                if(i !== -1){
                    xml[node] = xml[node][singulars[i]];
                }
            }
        }

        if(typeof(xml[node]) === 'object'){
            xml[node] = cleanXML(xml[node]);
        }

        if(typeof(xml[node]) === 'string'){
            value = xml[node].trim();

            if(value.match(isDig)){
                if(value.match(isInt)){
                    if(Math.abs(parseInt(value, radix)) <= Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER){
                        xml[node] = parseInt(value, radix);
                    }
                }else{
                    l = value.length;

                    if(l <= 15){
                        xml[node] = parseFloat(value);
                    }else{
                        for(i = 0, s = -1, e = -1; i < l && e - s <= 15; ++i){
                            if(value.charAt(i) > 0){
                                if(s === -1){
                                    s = i;
                                }else{
                                    e = i;
                                }
                            }
                        }

                        if(e - s <= 15){
                            xml[node] = parseFloat(value);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return xml;
};

Examples:

{
  queries: { query: [ {}, {}, {} ] }
}

becomes

{
  queries: [ {}, {}, {} ]
}

and

{
  types: { type: [ {}, {}, {} ] }
}

becomes

{
  types: [ {}, {}, {} ]
}

It will also safely convert integers/floating points.

Edit: Replaced for... in with for

4

For those who are wondering, xml2js use and abuse of array

For my file, the tree would be:

.result //Object
|_.head //Array
|_.body //Array
  |_.update //Array
  | |_.$ //Object
  |   |_.fields //Strings
  |
  |_.stream //Array
  | |_.$ //Object
  |   |_.fields //Strings
  |
  |_.playlist //Array
    |_.$ //Object
      |_.fields //Strings
      |
      |_.video //Array
        |_.$ //Object
          |_.fields //Strings
  • 3
    … and, better yet, it actually answers the question. I didn't provide a template or example. :) – Garth Kidd May 20 '14 at 0:53
1

You might want to try console.log(util.inspect(result, false, null)), which should display the whole result.

  • 1
    Thanks for the edit, @BhargavRao, that makes me happier with this being an answer. – Clonkex Apr 16 '18 at 6:57
0

For me it was a console.dir issue or more accurately a non-issue.

I had the same result when I console.dir the output:

{
 TextView: [ [Object] ],
 ImageView: [ [Object] ] } }

But I was surprised to find out that it was a console.dir limitation and the data was actually there. Apparently console.dir does not show more than a few levels. When I console.dir a deeper level the data was there:

 console.log(result.RelativeLayout.TextView);

output:

 { '$':
 { 'android:layout_width': 'wrap_content',
   'android:layout_height': 'wrap_content',
   'android:layout_marginLeft': '10dp',
   'android:layout_marginTop': '10dp',
   'android:textColor': '#ffffff',
   'android:id': '@+id/textView',
   'android:text': 'Hello World!' } }

I started looking for others libs only to go back and try again. If it helps anybody hurray.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.