104

I was wondering what the best approach is for configuring a module export. "async.function" in the example below could be a FS or HTTP request, simplified for the sake of the example:

Here's example code (asynmodule.js):

var foo = "bar"
async.function(function(response) {
  foo = "foobar";
  // module.exports = foo;  // having the export here breaks the app: foo is always undefined.
});

// having the export here results in working code, but without the variable being set.
module.exports = foo;

How can I export the module only once the async callback has been executed?

edit a quick note on my actual use-case: I'm writing a module to configure nconf (https://github.com/flatiron/nconf) in an fs.exists() callback (i.e. it will parse a config file and set up nconf).

2
  • Been playing around with my actual use-case, and nconf loads fine if nconf.file() is called with a non-existent file, so for now I don't need a solution. But am still interested in the approach.
    – Brett
    Nov 27, 2013 at 9:54
  • I have the same question, I could like to export a promise, and the require load the dependency asynchronously. I think that is possible with babel formatter. However, I don't think a good solution for these. :(
    – Junle Li
    Oct 24, 2015 at 16:12

6 Answers 6

69

Your export can't work because it is outside the function while the foodeclaration is inside. But if you put the export inside, when you use your module you can't be sure the export was defined.

The best way to work with an ansync system is to use callback. You need to export a callback assignation method to get the callback, and call it on the async execution.

Example:

var foo, callback;
async.function(function(response) {
    foo = "foobar";

    if( typeof callback == 'function' ){
        callback(foo);
    }
});

module.exports = function(cb){
    if(typeof foo != 'undefined'){
        cb(foo); // If foo is already define, I don't wait.
    } else {
        callback = cb;
    }
}

Here async.function is just a placeholder to symbolise an async call.

In main

var fooMod = require('./foo.js');
fooMod(function(foo){
    //Here code using foo;
});

Multiple callback way

If your module need to be called more than once you need to manage an array of callback:

var foo, callbackList = [];
async.function(function(response) {
    foo = "foobar";

    // You can use all other form of array walk.
    for(var i = 0; i < callbackList.length; i++){
        callbackList[i](foo)
    }
});

module.exports = function(cb){
    if(typeof foo != 'undefined'){
        cb(foo); // If foo is already define, I don't wait.
    } else {
        callback.push(cb);
    }
}

Here async.function is just a placeholder to symbolise an async call.

In main

var fooMod = require('./foo.js');
fooMod(function(foo){
    //Here code using foo;
});

Promise way

You can also use Promise to solve that. This method support multiple call by the design of the Promise:

var foo, callback;
module.exports = new Promise(function(resolve, reject){
    async.function(function(response) {
        foo = "foobar"

        resolve(foo);
    });
});

Here async.function is just a placeholder to symbolise an async call.

In main

var fooMod = require('./foo.js').then(function(foo){
    //Here code using foo;
});

See Promise documentation

12
  • 3
    This wouldn't work if two separate (main) files call this function without foo being ready, right? Only one of their callback would be fired, whichever was the latest to call it.. Oct 19, 2014 at 5:11
  • In this case, yes. Beaucause we don't manage a callback stack. But it is easy to solve that with an array to store all the callback.
    – Techniv
    Oct 28, 2014 at 13:58
  • Details:ReferenceError: async is not defined
    – 1nstinct
    Oct 10, 2016 at 14:53
  • 1
    I have 2 questions: (1) What is the essence of the else block in your first example where you say if(typeof foo != 'undefined'){ cb(foo); // If foo is already define, I don't wait. } else { callback = cb; }. (2) Does that block imply that requires to this module keep invoking it until it yields a value (from its async journey)? Or does it assume that only 1 callback will be given to the module throughout its lifetime i.e. subsequent calls can omit the cb argument? Dec 16, 2018 at 16:24
  • 1
    @IWantAnswers, in this exemple the module can be require multiple time by diferent module that need use the foo value. But you don't know when it's happened. So when it's early and the foo value don't exist yet you store the callbacks to wait the return of the async call. At the end of the async process, all the stored callbacks are unstack and the array was no more used. At this point, if another module require this module and subscribe to get the foo value, the value is already set, so you bypass the store to directly execute the callback.
    – Techniv
    Jan 8, 2019 at 15:04
26

An ES7 approach would be an immediatly invoked async function in module.exports :

module.exports = (async function(){
 //some async initiallizers
 //e.g. await the db module that has the same structure like this
  var db = await require("./db");
  var foo = "bar";

  //resolve the export promise
  return {
    foo
  };
})()

This can be required with await later:

(async function(){

  var foo = await require("./theuppercode");
  console.log(foo);
})();
3
  • Can you explain the difference/implications between invoking it and not? Nov 8, 2019 at 21:24
  • 1
    If you don't invoke the function, you export the function without executing it. Nov 8, 2019 at 21:25
  • Brilliant. Should be the accepted answer. Nov 10, 2021 at 1:19
15

ES6 answer using promises:

const asyncFunc = () => {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        // Where someAsyncFunction takes a callback, i.e. api call
        someAsyncFunction(data => {
            resolve(data)
        })
    })
}

export default asyncFunc

...
import asyncFunc from './asyncFunc'
asyncFunc().then(data => { console.log(data) })

Or you could return the Promise itself directly:

const p = new Promise(...)
export default p
...
import p from './asyncModule'
p.then(...)
7
  • 1
    This is the correct, modern answer for ES6 and Promises. Thank you for this. Feb 4, 2017 at 20:30
  • 1
    Question: Is there a reason why you are returning a function instead of the Promise directly? If you returned the Promise directly you could access it with asyncFunc.then(...), right? Pretty new so want to get your opinion. Feb 4, 2017 at 20:31
  • 1
    That would work too. I think when I wrote this example I was exporting a class with an async method so formulated it like a function. But you could just export the Promise like so: const p = new Promise(...); export default p; and then in your import module import p from '...'; p.then(...);
    – inostia
    Feb 5, 2017 at 2:44
  • Awesome, thanks for clarifying that. I suppose it's a personal preference or is there a best practices way to use one or the other? Feb 8, 2017 at 17:39
  • I guess it depends on if you need to pass an argument to your async module, which is usually the case for me (eg. an id or other params). In the first example if const asyncFunc = (id) => ... then you could use id in your function. You'd call it like asyncFunc(id).then(...). But if you don't need to pass any arguments, returning the Promise directly is fine as well.
    – inostia
    Feb 9, 2017 at 18:47
12

Another approach would be wrapping the variable inside an object.

var Wrapper = function(){
  this.foo = "bar";
  this.init();
};
Wrapper.prototype.init = function(){
  var wrapper = this;  
  async.function(function(response) {
    wrapper.foo = "foobar";
  });
}
module.exports = new Wrapper();

If the initializer has error, at least you still get the uninitialized value instead of hanging callback.

2
  • 3
    How do you get "foo" when you require the module? Jul 22, 2016 at 7:21
  • 1
    var wrapper = require('wrapper'); console.log(wrapper.foo)
    – vangoz
    May 2, 2017 at 7:12
10

You can also make use of Promises:

some-async-module.js

module.exports = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    setTimeout(resolve.bind(null, 'someValueToBeReturned'), 2000);
});

main.js

var asyncModule = require('./some-async-module');

asyncModule.then(promisedResult => console.log(promisedResult)); 
// outputs 'someValueToBeReturned' after 2 seconds

The same can happen in a different module and will also resolve as expected:

in-some-other-module.js

var asyncModule = require('./some-async-module');

asyncModule.then(promisedResult => console.log(promisedResult)); 
// also outputs 'someValueToBeReturned' after 2 seconds

Note that the promise object is created once then it's cached by node. Each require('./some-async-module') will return the same object instance (promise instance in this case).

0
0

Other answers seemed to be partial answers and didn't work for me. This seems to be somewhat complete:

some-module.js

var Wrapper = function(){
  this.callbacks = [];
  this.foo = null;
  this.init();
};
Wrapper.prototype.init = function(){
  var wrapper = this;  
  async.function(function(response) {
    wrapper.foo = "foobar";
    this.callbacks.forEach(function(callback){
       callback(null, wrapper.foo);
    });
  });
}
Wrapper.prototype.get = function(cb) {
    if(typeof cb !== 'function') {
        return this.connection; // this could be null so probably just throw
    }
    if(this.foo) {
        return cb(null, this.foo);
    }
    this.callbacks.push(cb);
}
module.exports = new Wrapper();

main.js

var wrapper = require('./some-module');

wrapper.get(function(foo){
    // foo will always be defined
});

main2.js

var wrapper = require('./some-module');

wrapper.get(function(foo){
    // foo will always be defined in another script
});
2
  • Why do you have callback(null, wrapper.foo); instead of callback(wrapper.foo);? Dec 16, 2018 at 16:10
  • @IWantAnswers The first argument is error and second one is the result
    – Taku
    Dec 22, 2018 at 4:18

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