8

I want to print out a dictionary, sorted by the key. Sorting the keys is easy in the view, by just putting the keys in a list and then sorting the list. How can I loop through the keys in the template and then get the value from the dictionary.

{% for company in companies %}
    {% for employee, dependents in company_dict.company.items %}
    {% endfor %}
{% endfor %}

(Just made up the example...) The part that doesn't work is the "company_dict.company.items" part. I need the "company" to be the value of company. Right now the company prat is looking for a key named "company" not the value of "company" from the loop above.

I'm doing a bit of processing to put the dictionary of dictionaries together. Changing the layout of the data isn't really an option. I figure the right approach is to write up a template tag, just wanted to know if there was a built-in way I missed.

  • 4
    Any reason why aren't you doing this in the view? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 8 '10 at 0:25
  • It's a bunch of processing. And to set it up so as not to have to do anything in the template, would take a second pass at the data. I guess I could just do that... Figured if it were possible to leave as is, it'd be better. – johannix Jan 8 '10 at 0:34
  • Django's built-in filter dictsort sorts values based on a key but it doesn't sort the keys itself. – Anupam Jul 11 '18 at 10:23
3

a custom template filter will do the trick.

from django import template
register = template.Library()

def dict_get(value, arg):
    #custom template tag used like so:
    #{{dictionary|dict_get:var}}
    #where dictionary is duh a dictionary and var is a variable representing
    #one of it's keys

    return value[arg]

register.filter('dict_get',dict_get)

more on custom template filters: http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/howto/custom-template-tags/#howto-custom-template-tags

in your example you'd do:

{% for employee, dependents in company_dict|company %}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Thanks a lot! I had to modify what you did a bit. My filter returns "value[arg].iteritems()" and the template looks like so: {% for employee, dependents in company_dict|get_dict_and_iter:company %} – johannix Jan 8 '10 at 0:44
  • hey whatever works. most people using this site could modify what i did to their circumstance as well. – Brandon Henry Jan 8 '10 at 3:26
19

create a custom filter, which is like this:

from django import template
from django.utils.datastructures import SortedDict

register = template.Library()

@register.filter(name='sort')
def listsort(value):
    if isinstance(value, dict):
        new_dict = SortedDict()
        key_list = sorted(value.keys())
        for key in key_list:
            new_dict[key] = value[key]
        return new_dict
    elif isinstance(value, list):
        return sorted(value)
    else:
        return value
    listsort.is_safe = True

then in your template you shall call it using:

{% for key, value in companies.items|sort %}
      {{ key }} {{ value }}
{% endfor %}

You will be able to get the sorted dict by Key.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Maybe nearly exact duplicate, but while the other one didn't, this answer helped me and is dad-gum brilliant, thank you so much! – mVChr Mar 22 '12 at 22:39
  • It also helped me more than the previous answer ! – Mibou Mar 22 '13 at 22:31
  • "Marking a filter is_safe will coerce the filter’s return value to a string. If your filter should return a boolean or other non-string value, marking it is_safe will probably have unintended consequences (such as converting a boolean False to the string ‘False’)." (django documentation) So, it is probably better to remove that is_safe line. – Denilson Sá Maia Sep 26 '14 at 20:06
  • 1
    Also, SortedDict is deprecated as of Django 1.7 and will be removed in Django 1.9.. Use collections.OrderedDict instead (available in Python 2.7 and in Python 3). – Denilson Sá Maia Sep 26 '14 at 20:16
  • Tried and tested. Works perfectly! Thanks for the solution. – Varun Verma Jan 20 '17 at 22:04
1

This last solution was very useful to me too. I'm using Django 1.6.2, and it seems to be converting a dict to a list with the key as the first elemement of that list and the content as the second. So even when I pass in a dict, it treats it as a list. So I tweaked the above to look like this, and it works for me:

@register.filter(name='sort')
def listsort(value):
    if isinstance(value, list):
        return sorted(value, key=lambda k:k[0])
    else:
        return value
| improve this answer | |
0

for some reasone Turikumwe's filter not worked for me (python3.4, Django 1.7), so I rewrite it to return list of tuples instead of SertedDict or OrderedDict:

@register.filter(name='sort')
def listsort(value):
    if isinstance(value, dict):
        a = []
        key_list = sorted(value.keys())
        for key in key_list:
            a.append((key, value[key]))
        return a
    elif isinstance(value, list):
        return sorted(value)
    else:
        return value

listsort.is_safe = True

So in template we don't need to get .items

{% for key, value in companies|sort %}
      {{ key }} {{ value }}
{% endfor %}
| improve this answer | |
0

Turikumwe's answer got me close, but did not work for my environment: python3 and Django 1.10.

I found that invoking the filter with:

{% for key, value in companies.items|sort %}
      {{ key }} {{ value }}
{% endfor %}

actually results in a ItemsView object, not a dict. (I suspect this is a python 2 vs 3 issue). Given the ItemsView, the answer is even easier

from django import template
from django.utils.datastructures import ItemsView

register = template.Library()

@register.filter(name='sort')
def listsort(value):
    if isinstance(value, ItemsView) or isinstance(value, list):
        return sorted(value)
    else:
        return value
| improve this answer | |
0

You can use django's dictsort or dictsortreversed.

{% for user in list_users|dictsort:'created_at' %}
    {{user.username}} - {{user.created_at}}
{% endfor %}

or

{% for user in list_users|dictsortreversed:'created_at' %}
    {{user.username}} - {{user.created_at}}
{% endfor %}
| improve this answer | |

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