7

I'm sure I'm making this harder than it needs to be.

I have a vector...

vector<Joints> mJointsVector;

...comprised of structs patterned after the following:

struct Joints
{
    string name;

    float origUpperLimit;
    float origLowerLimit;   
};

I'm trying to search mJointsVector with "std::find" to locate an individual joint by its string name - no luck so far, but the examples from the following have helped, at least conceptually:

Vectors, structs and std::find

Can anyone point me further in the right direction?

3
  • 1
    While the answers below are well and good, your usage sounds like you should be using a map instead, from string to Joints. This will also improve your look-up times.
    – GManNickG
    Jan 8, 2010 at 7:16
  • I think you're probably right - I'll have to look into this later.
    – Monte Hurd
    Jan 8, 2010 at 8:49
  • Wow, maps and multimaps are great! Especially with for_each using function objects instead of loops! codeproject.com/KB/stl/replace_for_for_each.aspx?display=Print So useful to be able to "reuse" loop code this way.
    – Monte Hurd
    Feb 9, 2010 at 8:01

6 Answers 6

16

A straight-forward-approach:

struct FindByName {
    const std::string name;
    FindByName(const std::string& name) : name(name) {}
    bool operator()(const Joints& j) const { 
        return j.name == name; 
    }
};

std::vector<Joints>::iterator it = std::find_if(m_jointsVector.begin(),
                                                m_jointsVector.end(),
                                                FindByName("foo"));

if(it != m_jointsVector.end()) {
    // ...
}

Alternatively you might want to look into something like Boost.Bind to reduce the amount of code.

4
  • 2
    while this works, I think the operator() of a function object should always be const, just for flexibility. if one day you have a range of const Joints, the function object still works.
    – vividos
    Jan 8, 2010 at 7:46
  • This only seems to work if I change "bool operator(" to "bool operator()(". Is this correct? I'm overwhelmed by how many ways there are to do this!
    – Monte Hurd
    Jan 8, 2010 at 8:14
  • Oops, i missed the first parentheses - fixed. Jan 8, 2010 at 8:18
  • 1
    @vividos: It already works with const Joints - i agree on the constness though. Jan 8, 2010 at 9:34
5

how about:

std::string name = "xxx";

std::find_if(mJointsVector.begin(), 
             mJointsVector.end(), 
             [&s = name](const Joints& j) -> bool { return s == j.name; }); 
13
  • Uh, what? This isn't yet supported :P (Even then, I think this is wrong.)
    – GManNickG
    Jan 8, 2010 at 7:20
  • 7
    Its not wrong, its correct and in a couple of years time, this answer will be seen as being "more" correct when compared to the others.
    – Matthieu N.
    Jan 8, 2010 at 8:14
  • 1
    @Monte: The other answers are what you need to do today. This feature, called "lambdas", are basically in-place functions. In essence, they create unnamed functors, similar to the other answers. But this keeps the logic close to the calling site, and is arguably more readible.
    – GManNickG
    Jan 8, 2010 at 8:23
  • 2
    @GMan: jeeez you're too quick for me, i was hoping to go under the radar with that edit :>
    – Matthieu N.
    Jan 8, 2010 at 8:26
  • 3
    @dribeas: (1)The type is Joints not Joint (2) The comparison is correct - please read the code (3) Generally this is the direction C++ is going, people should start using these features instead of slopping around with vc6, vc8, vc9 gen compilers.
    – Matthieu N.
    Jan 8, 2010 at 8:29
1

You should be able to add a equals operator do your struct

struct Joints
{
    std::string name;

    bool operator==(const std::string & str) { return name == str; }
};

Then you can search using find.

3
  • The equality operator should be reserved for use to test if two objects of the same type are equivalent. Only very rarely should you use it to compare with other types. Jan 8, 2010 at 7:31
  • Mind explaining why or cite a source that does?
    – Jason T.
    Jan 8, 2010 at 8:02
  • This simple short answer has many shortcommings: you should prefer free function operators over member function operators (symmetry with respect to types in some operations), if you overload == you should also overload !=, and finally as Martin pointed, when overloading an operator you should not change the semantics. The operator symbol implies some semantics to the reader, if those semantics are broken the possibility of errors in user code increases. Who could think that a==b would yield true for different objects? Jan 8, 2010 at 8:23
1
#include <boost/bind.hpp>

std::vector<Joints>::iterator it;

it = std::find_if(mJointsVector.begin(),
                  mJointsVector.end(),
                  boost::bind(&Joints::name, _1) == name_to_find);
0
bool
operator == (const Joints& joints, const std::string& name) {
    return joints.name == name;
}

std::find(mJointsVector.begin(), mJointsVector.end(), std::string("foo"));
0
struct Compare: public unary_function <const string&>
{
     public:
            Compare(string _findString):mfindString(_findString){}
            bool operator () (string _currString)
            {
                return _currString == mfindString ;
            }
     private:
            string mfindString ;
}

std::find_if(mJointsVector.begin(), mJointsVector.end(), Compare("urstring")) ;
1
  • You never declared _currString or _findString and your inheritance is wrong (precise the template parameters) Jan 8, 2010 at 17:37

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