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I'm trying to build a context-free grammar symulator, using the tip from other question but I have a problem allocating enough memory.

The basic code :

char * print_S ( )
{
    int los = zero_or_one();
    if ( los == 1 )
            return "1";
    else
            return strcat( print_A(), print_A() );
}

char * print_A ( )
{
    int los = zero_or_one();
    if ( los == 1 )
            return "0";
    else
            return strcat( print_S(), print_S() );
}

Returns segmentation fault when los = 0.
Then I tried something with alloccating memory for the string and then passing it to the functions, but still no luck:

char * out = (char *) malloc( 100 * sizeof(*out) );
printf("%s\n", print_S( out ) );

and

char * print_S ( char * out )
{
    int los = zero_or_one();

    if ( los == 1 ) {
        strcpy (out, "1");
        return out;
    } else {
        return strcat( print_A(out), print_A(out) );
    }
}

char * print_A ( char * out )
{
    int los = zero_or_one();

    if ( los == 1 ) {
        strcpy (out, "0");
        return out;
    } else {
        return strcat( print_S(out), print_S(out) );
    }
}

What's the right approach? Thanks

  • 1
    If print_A is roughly the same as print_S, then you are trying to strcat on a constant string. The first approach is definitely wrong. The thing you tried with malloc should work but you need to allocate enough memory. If you have too many recursive calls you will have an overflow and the program will crash with a segfault. There is also a problem with the line return strcat(print_A(out), print_A(out)) because one call of print_A will overwrite the work of the other print_A since you are passing the same address to both calls. – Cahu Nov 28 '13 at 9:24
  • You might be getting seg fault cos the termination condition for the recursive function might be wrong. I am not getting what you are trying to do here... – user1814023 Nov 28 '13 at 9:25
  • @Cahu I added the rest of the code. Yeah, I know - the first verison is just the draft I got from the previous question. But the second version still doesn't work. And I run it several times, so if it was right then some of the output should be < 100 characters but I got the segmentation fault every time. – pawel.ad Nov 28 '13 at 9:27
  • @Nishith Jain M R What I'm trying to do is explained int the question linked at the beginning, but I'm having problems implementing this in C. – pawel.ad Nov 28 '13 at 9:29
  • Note that with the calls like strcat(print_A(), print_A()) (with or without arguments), it is indeterminate whether the LH or RH instance of print_A() is called first. There is no guarantee of left-to-right (or right-to-left) ordering. – Jonathan Leffler Nov 28 '13 at 10:26
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Given the context of the other question, I think you should arrange for the initial call to the functions to be given the start and end of an array of, say, 100 characters. As you work down recursively, you increment the start pointer that you pass to other functions appropriately.

This code works for me:

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

/* One of these is sufficient; symmetry requires both */
static char *print_S(char *dst, char *end);
static char *print_A(char *dst, char *end);

static int zero_or_one(void)
{
    int rv = rand() % 2;
    return rv;
}

static char *print_S(char *dst, char *end)
{
    assert(dst <= end);
    if (dst < end)
    {
        if (zero_or_one() == 0)
            *dst++ = '0';
        else
        {
            dst = print_A(dst, end);
            dst = print_A(dst, end);
        }
    }
    *dst = '\0';
    return dst;
}

static char *print_A(char *dst, char *end)
{
    assert(dst <= end);
    if (dst < end)
    {
        if (zero_or_one() == 1)
            *dst++ = '1';
        else
        {
            dst = print_S(dst, end);
            dst = print_S(dst, end);
        }
    }
    *dst = '\0';
    return dst;
}

int main(void)
{
    srand(time(0));
    for (int i = 0; i < 25; i++)
    {
        char buffer[100];
        (void)print_A(buffer, buffer + sizeof(buffer) - 1);
        printf("%s\n", buffer);
        (void)print_S(buffer, buffer + sizeof(buffer) - 1);
        printf("%s\n", buffer);
    }
    return 0;
}

Note that the sequences are often very short but can be quite long. One example run:

01011
0
1
0
1
0
00
11
1
0
1
0
1
1110
00
101110101000000011100001110000100111011011000110001000000111010001000110000100010000111111001100011
1
0
11000011111000110011001000011100
0
1
1000000100001000
011
0
110
0
1
0
1
001
1
0110110011000
11110011110101100101100000111101011010001000110110010100011001100
10111001100101
1
100
100010
0
00
0
011
11
0000100010110
0
1
11
00
0
1
0

Some example runs were truncated at 99 characters — as the long one in this example was. I tried with sizes 300 and 1000 too; in both cases, I got sample runs that were truncated.

If you want to do dynamic memory allocation, you have to be a little bit more devious:

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>

/* One of these is sufficient; symmetry requires both */
static char *print_S(char **buffer, size_t *len, char *dst);
static char *print_A(char **buffer, size_t *len, char *dst);

static int zero_or_one(void)
{
    int rv = rand() % 2;
    return rv;
}

static void add_space(char **buffer, size_t *len, char **dst)
{
    assert(*dst < *buffer + *len);
    if (*dst == *buffer + *len - 1)
    {
        char *newbuf = realloc(*buffer, 2 * *len);
        if (newbuf == 0)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "Out of memory (%zu)\n", 2 * *len);
            exit(1);
        }
        *len *= 2;
        *buffer = newbuf;
        *dst = *buffer + strlen(*buffer);
    }
}

static char *print_S(char **buffer, size_t *len, char *dst)
{
    add_space(buffer, len, &dst);

    if (zero_or_one() == 0)
        *dst++ = '0';
    else
    {
        dst = print_A(buffer, len, dst);
        dst = print_A(buffer, len, dst);
    }
    *dst = '\0';
    return dst;
}

static char *print_A(char **buffer, size_t *len, char *dst)
{
    add_space(buffer, len, &dst);
    if (zero_or_one() == 1)
        *dst++ = '1';
    else
    {
        dst = print_S(buffer, len, dst);
        dst = print_S(buffer, len, dst);
    }
    *dst = '\0';
    return dst;
}

int main(void)
{
    srand(time(0));
    size_t len = 100;
    char *buffer = malloc(len);
    for (int i = 0; i < 25; i++)
    {
        (void)print_A(&buffer, &len, buffer);
        printf("%zu: %s\n", strlen(buffer), buffer);
        (void)print_S(&buffer, &len, buffer);
        printf("%zu: %s\n", strlen(buffer), buffer);
    }
    free(buffer);
    return 0;
}

With this, I got one run where the output string was 14,473,874 bytes long. I won't bother to print it here; suffice to say there were 1's and 0's in it.

  • Wow, thank you v e r y much kind sir. I'll have to educate myself more to fully understand this, but that's the point :-) I'll get right to it. Again, thank you! – pawel.ad Nov 28 '13 at 15:17
  • OK, I got it all to work - no repeating strings and all printed in order. Thanks! – pawel.ad Nov 28 '13 at 20:05

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