14

Whenever I run the following program the returned values are always 6 or 13.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <ctime>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;

//void randomLegs();
//void randomPush();
//void randomPull();
//void randomMisc();


int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    srand(time(NULL));
    //randomLegs();
    cout << rand() % 14;
    return 0;
}

I have run the program close to a hundred times during today and yesterday.

Can anyone tell me what I'm doing wrong?

Thank you.

EDIT: By the way, if I change the range of rand() to say 13 or 15 it works just fine.

  • If you have specific requirements beyond those rand is guarantted to meet, don't use rand. – David Schwartz Oct 9 '14 at 20:51
8

I can reproduce the problem on Mac OS X 10.9 with Xcode 5 - it looks like it might actually be a bug, or at least a limitation with rand()/srand() on OS X 10.9.

I recommend you use arc4random() instead, which works a lot better than rand(), and which doesn't require that you randomize the seed:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    cout << (arc4random() % 14) << endl;
    return 0;
}

Test:

$ g++ -Wall -O3 srand.cpp && ./a.out
5
$ ./a.out
8
$ ./a.out
0
$ ./a.out
8
$ ./a.out
11
$ ./a.out
8
$ ./a.out
3
$ ./a.out
13
$ ./a.out
9
$
  • 2
    Thank you Paul. This solution is simple and it solves my problem. – Kenneth Nov 28 '13 at 13:27
  • 5
    Why use another library, if the Standard library has alternatives too? See <random>, in particular std::mt19937 which is a known-good RNG. It also comes with std::uniform_int_distribution – MSalters Nov 28 '13 at 17:21
  • 2
    @MSalters: arc4random() is pretty standard on Mac OS X, iOS, and various BSD platforms, and doesn't require an additional library. – Paul R Nov 28 '13 at 18:42
  • 1
    @MSalters arc4random() is in the BSD C library, it doesn't require any additional setup. Also, not everyone can use or assume the availability of C++11 for various reasons. – user529758 Feb 2 '14 at 13:01
  • 5
    @PaulR Exactly. Also, an even better solution would be to use arc4random_uniform(MAX) instead of arc4random() % MAX. – user529758 Feb 2 '14 at 13:02
34

Per wikipedia, the multiplier being used in Apple's MCG random number generator is 16807. This is divisible by 7, so the first random number produced after srand() will have only one bit of entropy mod 14 (that is, it can only take on two values).

It's a crappy RNG they've got there. An easy solution, though, is just to call rand() a few times right after srand, and discard the results.

  • 7
    +1, beautiful explanation! I wasn't aware how flaky these things could be. Usually the explanation I see for "why you should never modulo over a short range" is just that it's not uniform around the edges. – Leeor Nov 28 '13 at 13:35
  • 16
    Incidentally, an even simpler workaround is to wait about 18 million years, and then try the program again. At that point, the value returned by time() will be great enough to push the entropy "around the corner" into the low-order bits. Give that a try, and let our descendants know how it works out. :-D – Sneftel Nov 28 '13 at 13:37
  • +1, great answer. – Moo-Juice Nov 28 '13 at 14:11
  • That's why rand() % 7 always return 0 – phuclv Sep 23 '15 at 15:48
3

rand() % 14 is often a poor random number generator. You'll probably get better results with this

(int)(14*(rand()/(RAND_MAX + 1.0)))
  • 2
    This is the only non-deleted answer left! Hang in there @john! – Moo-Juice Nov 28 '13 at 12:09
  • Just to clarify. I'm not the one deleting answers. – Kenneth Nov 28 '13 at 13:22
  • @user3045273, don't worry - they were deleted by their owners. – Moo-Juice Nov 28 '13 at 13:22
  • If the answer given by Sneftel is correct, then this would be a valid solution. I want my downvote back! – john Nov 28 '13 at 13:38
  • 2
    John's solution produces a value with about 3.8 bits of entropy, versus the original code which produced 1 (and extremely close to the theoretical maximum). So yes, it actually is better. – Sneftel Nov 28 '13 at 14:54

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