1

specifically, what is the difference for following two definitions:

  def func(f: () => String) = f()
  def func1(s: String) = s

I wrote some codes to test them, it seems they produce the same result; are those two definitions just the same in this scenario; or they do have some difference?

  var x = 1

  def f() = {
    x = x + 1
    s"$x"
  }

  println(func1(f))
  println(func1(f))
  println(func1(f))

  println(func(f))
  println(func(f))
  println(func(f))
2

They are perhaps the same in THIS scenario, but there are lots of other scenarios when a () => A and a A are much different. () => A is referred to as a thunk and is used to pass a piece of delayed computation to a function. The body of the "thunk" doesn't get evaluated until the function called decides to evaluate it. Otherwitse, the value of the argument being passed in is evaluated by the caller.

Consider this example, where there IS a difference between the version that takes a thunk and the version that just takes a value:

    object Thunk {
  def withThunk(f: () ⇒ String): Unit = {
    println("withThunk before")
    println("the thunk's value is: " + f())
    println("now the thunk's value is: " + f())
  }

  def withoutThunk(f: String): Unit = {
    println("withoutThunk before")
    println("now the value's value is: " + f)
  }

  def main(argv: Array[String]): Unit = {
    withThunk { () ⇒ println("i'm inside a thunk"); "thunk value" }
    println("------------")
    withoutThunk { println("i'm not inside a thunk"); "just a value" }
  }
}

This program will demonstrate some differences. In the thunk version, you see "withThunk before" get printed before the first time "i'm inside a thunk" gets printed, which gets printed twice, since f() is evaluated twice. In the non-thunk version, the "I'm not inside a thunk" gets printed before "withoutThunk before", since this is evaluated before being sent to the function as an argument.

1
def func(f: () => String) = f()

This one accepts as parameter a function that returns a string.

def func1(s: String) = s

While this one simple requires a String as parameter

Aside from the minor technical difference above, in this scenario they seem to function the same. However, the function parameter is potentially more powerful as it is a function that can derive its return value from several other operations. I think however, the main difference that the function parameter allows you to decide when the value is derived.

1
def func(f: () => String) = f()
def func1(s: String) = s

println(func1(f)) // in this case f is evaluated first, its value is used in func1.

println(func(f)) // in this case f is NOT evaluated, but passed as it is to func.
                 // It is upto func to call f whenever needed, or even not call it.

It is this "lazy" evaluation of f, that makes func more useful, for instance f can be passed to some other higher order functions, or it can be called asynchronously.

1

I want to add an example for the use of () => String.

def printFuncResult(f: () => String) = println(f() + " " + f())

def ran = () => Math.random.toString

printFuncResult(ran)
printFuncResult(Math.random.toString)

When you pass a function like ran then you will most likely have two different values printed (randomness is involved here). When you pass a fixed Random number then it will be printed twice.

As you can see: when you have a function as a parameter it might result in a different value each time it is used in printFuncResult. This is not possible when you just put a String parameter.

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