355

From git-clone(1) Manual Page

--branch can also take tags and detaches the HEAD at that commit in the resulting repository.

I tried

git clone --branch <tag_name> <repo_url>

But it does not work. It returns:

warning: Remote branch 2.13.0 not found in upstream origin, using HEAD instead

How to use this parameter?

2
  • possible duplicate of Download a specific tag with Git Oct 1 '14 at 16:30
  • 4
    You're right, but little difference. When I ask this question, in my situation, I needed to do this in one line and must use clone, and I was stuck at 'why --branch doesn't work'. The best answer of that url used clone->checkout, which cannot resolve my question. :)
    – Jiang Jun
    Oct 8 '14 at 8:35
607
git clone --depth 1 --branch <tag_name> <repo_url>

--depth 1 is optional but if you only need the state at that one revision, you probably want to skip downloading all the history up to that revision.

5
  • 2
    Note if the ref is ambiguous and you have a branch and a tag named the same thing, this will prefer the branch. Feb 21 '18 at 22:18
  • 7
    without the optional --depth 1 this is exactly the same as OPs or do i miss something? Sep 30 '20 at 14:10
  • 1
    @463035818 Seems the same, might be OP did not really have any 2.13.0 tag on remote.
    – wim
    Sep 7 '21 at 19:34
  • 2
    But tags are not branches. How do you get a specific tag?
    – Melab
    Sep 19 '21 at 16:05
  • @Melab, from a man page of git-clone, "--branch can also take tags and detaches the HEAD at that commit in the resulting repository" Sep 19 '21 at 22:43
92

Use --single-branch option to only clone history leading to tip of the tag. This saves a lot of unnecessary code from being cloned.

git clone <repo_url> --branch <tag_name> --single-branch
3
  • 8
    Is --single-branch equivalent to --depth 1?
    – igracia
    Jan 14 '16 at 14:34
  • 27
    No, its not equivalent. --single-branch clones the history for a whole branch. With --depth 1 no history at all is cloned. Feb 2 '16 at 11:15
  • 7
    Also --single-branch is implied when --depth is used. From the manual When creating a shallow clone with the --depth option, this is the default
    – koda
    Nov 18 '19 at 15:51
36
git clone -b 13.1rc1-Gotham  --depth 1  https://github.com/xbmc/xbmc.git
Cloning into 'xbmc'...
remote: Counting objects: 17977, done.
remote: Compressing objects: 100% (13473/13473), done.
Receiving objects:  36% (6554/17977), 19.21 MiB | 469 KiB/s    

Will be faster than :

git clone https://github.com/xbmc/xbmc.git
Cloning into 'xbmc'...
remote: Reusing existing pack: 281705, done.
remote: Counting objects: 533, done.
remote: Compressing objects: 100% (177/177), done.
Receiving objects:  14% (40643/282238), 55.46 MiB | 578 KiB/s

Or

git clone -b 13.1rc1-Gotham  https://github.com/xbmc/xbmc.git
Cloning into 'xbmc'...
remote: Reusing existing pack: 281705, done.
remote: Counting objects: 533, done.
remote: Compressing objects: 100% (177/177), done.
Receiving objects:  12% (34441/282238), 20.25 MiB | 461 KiB/s
2
  • 10
    --depth 1 is a gem, so many people download the whole git history just to use the HEAD.
    – MGP
    Nov 28 '14 at 15:17
  • 6
    --depth 1 should be made default; if someone tries to chechout a previous commit, they should be prompted to download the rest.
    – Jikku Jose
    Jun 30 '16 at 15:39
6

Use the command

git clone --help

to see whether your git supports the command

git clone --branch tag_name

If not, just do the following:

git clone repo_url 
cd repo
git checkout tag_name
5
git clone --depth 1 --branch <tag_name> <repo_url>

Example

git clone --depth 1 --branch 0.37.2 https://github.com/apache/incubator-superset.git

<tag_name> : 0.37.2

<repo_url> : https://github.com/apache/incubator-superset.git
1
  • 1
    The command is character for character exactly the same as the selected answer. Sep 7 '21 at 20:21
1

Cloning a specific tag, might return 'detached HEAD' state.

As a workaround, try to clone the repo first, and then checkout a specific tag. For example:

repo_url=https://github.com/owner/project.git
repo_dir=$(basename $repo_url .git)
repo_tag=0.5

git clone --single-branch $repo_url # using --depth 1 can show no tags
git --work-tree=$repo_dir --git-dir=$repo_dir/.git checkout tags/$repo_tag

Note: Since Git 1.8.5, you can use -C <path>, instead of --work-tree and --git-dir.

-1

If your intent is to work on the code locally, you'll want to pull code in a way that preserves the most recent tags and the most recent un-tagged code changes. If you clone with a depth of 1, and HEAD isn't tagged, you'll get a repository clone that has no tags.

So to grab the most recent code with the most recent tags I recommend this:

git clone --depth 50 <repo_url>

Basically what you're saying here is... "don't clone all history... just give me the last 50 commits." If you're dealing with code, commits are usually very small pieces of text (so 50 isn't that large). The number 50 is discretionary... what you're going for is a depth that is deep enough to give you the tags that you're looking for.

And implicitly the command above works on the main branch of the repository. If you specify --branch <tag> (use a specific tag name) you may run into another issue: you don't have the most recent code changes in the branch after the specified tag. You can avoid that scenario by using the form --branch <branch> instead. The small but important distinction is that when specifying a branch name, you will get all of the most recent activity (and not just the commits running up to the particular tag).

One more scenario to think about: What if you want to track two branches in a remote repository? One with a "v1" tag, and the newest code in "v2"?

In this case I recommend this:

git clone --depth 50 --no-single-branch <repo_url>

What this is saying is: "grab the last 50 commits from tip of each branch." Is this a lot of code? Probably not. You can see how many branches the remote repo has on Github. Cloning this way will give you the code you need if you want to switch back and forth between branches locally. In order to make branches visible in your environment simply do:

git checkout --track origin/<branch>

This will set you up with a local branch that tracks the remote branch (which is probably what you want). This works just fine because we have the tip of every branch in our local repo.

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