95

I want to create and delete a directory using Java, but it isn't working.

File index = new File("/home/Work/Indexer1");
if (!index.exists()) {
    index.mkdir();
} else {
    index.delete();
    if (!index.exists()) {
        index.mkdir();
    }
}

26 Answers 26

88

Java isn't able to delete folders with data in it. You have to delete all files before deleting the folder.

Use something like:

String[]entries = index.list();
for(String s: entries){
    File currentFile = new File(index.getPath(),s);
    currentFile.delete();
}

Then you should be able to delete the folder by using index.delete() Untested!

  • 35
    This won't delete non-empty subdirectories. – Francesco Menzani Feb 15 '15 at 17:20
  • 13
    you must write a recursive method or use FileUtils.deleteDirectory as @Francesco Menzani said. – EN20 Sep 14 '15 at 7:34
  • 4
    Be VERY careful. If index is a symbolic link to another directory, you'll wind up deleting the contents of the other directory. Unfortunately, I've not yet found a good way to detect symbolic links on Windows in Java 6, though Java 7 provides Files.isSymbolicLink(). – Hank Schultz Nov 11 '15 at 16:04
  • 1
    Solution: wrap this chunk of code in if (!index.delete()) {...}. Then, if index is a symbolic link, it's deleted regardless of whether it appears it has contents. – Hank Schultz Nov 11 '15 at 16:16
  • This will throw a NullPointerException if there is an I/O exception while reading the directory. The code should check whether entries is null. – mernst Oct 31 '17 at 23:55
162

Just a one-liner.

import org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils;

FileUtils.deleteDirectory(new File(destination));

Documentation here

  • Does not work for me. DirectoryNotEmptyException – Dimmduh Mar 13 '16 at 6:13
  • 9
    um...no. This is a one-liner with an external dependency, which is an important thing to keep in mind. The only time using an external dependency like this is this simple is when you're doing a personal home project, or your company really doesn't care about the possibility of getting sued. – searchengine27 Apr 5 '17 at 21:34
  • 7
    @searchengine27 but it seems the library is under Apache Commons so the risk of getting sued is negligible whitesourcesoftware.com/whitesource-blog/…. – simtim Jul 23 '17 at 12:29
  • 1
    @simtim you're missing the point entirely. A company will never approve a library to use without a team of lawyers pouring over the terms of use and end user agreements, and any other legal documents associated with the library first. Somebody has to pay those lawyers...sometimes nobody wants to, which means the developer doesn't get to use it. The bigger the company you work for, the more red tape you have to go through. – searchengine27 Jul 24 '17 at 22:02
  • 13
    @searchengine27 no, you're missing the point entirely. A company that needs an army of lawyers to allow to use apache commons is the absolute pathology, and nothing near the norm in IT world. I've never heard of anyone having such problems and if you have such problems you have most likely access to SO blocked so the answer would not be accessible to you anyway. – 9ilsdx 9rvj 0lo Mar 20 '18 at 16:20
91

This works, and while it looks inefficient to skip the directory test, it's not: the test happens right away in listFiles().

void deleteDir(File file) {
    File[] contents = file.listFiles();
    if (contents != null) {
        for (File f : contents) {
            deleteDir(f);
        }
    }
    file.delete();
}

Update, to avoid following symbolic links:

void deleteDir(File file) {
    File[] contents = file.listFiles();
    if (contents != null) {
        for (File f : contents) {
            if (! Files.isSymbolicLink(f.toPath())) {
                deleteDir(f);
            }
        }
    }
    file.delete();
}
  • 2
    As it turns out, there is a bug in this. If another process deletes the files during the loop, it can cause an exception that should be caught and ignored. – Jeff Learman Sep 8 '17 at 21:53
  • @PerryTew no, rediscovering America is not an advantage. There are many things missing there, for example symlink handling. – 9ilsdx 9rvj 0lo Mar 20 '18 at 16:25
  • 2
    @9ilsdx9rvj0lo Rather than being snarky, perhaps you could provide an edit to handle symlinks. The OP said nothing about symbolic links in his post. Just creating and deleting a directory. Please also list out the "many things missing". Help us out. – Perry Tew Mar 21 '18 at 17:31
  • @PerryTew I'm not being snarky. I'm just pointing out, that I do fully disagree with your comment about the answer being better because no external libraries are being used. It is not. There is a good reason people are using apache commons : you don't have to program any single thing yourself. Symlinks are just an example of things you'll miss writing everything from scratch. – 9ilsdx 9rvj 0lo Mar 22 '18 at 7:31
  • 2
    It's not a matter of better/worse, but pros and cons. Not relying on external libraries is sometimes a significant benefit. Of course, there's a significant benefit to using tried-and-true software. It's up to the developer to balance the issues. If there are bugs other than the two already mentioned, we'd certainly like to know about them. – Jeff Learman Apr 2 '18 at 23:40
23

In JDK 7 you could use Files.walkFileTree() and Files.deleteIfExists() to delete a tree of files.

In JDK 6 one possible way is to use FileUtils.deleteQuietly from Apache Commons which will remove a file, a directory, or a directory with files and sub-directories.

20

I prefer this solution on java 8:

  Files.walk(pathToBeDeleted)
    .sorted(Comparator.reverseOrder())
    .map(Path::toFile)
    .forEach(File::delete);

From this site: http://www.baeldung.com/java-delete-directory

  • 2
    Note that this may have scalability issues since it builds the full list, creates a sorted copy, and then iterates over the sorted copy. Back in the bad old days when memory wasn't inexhaustible, this would be a very bad idea. It's concise but at a cost in space (O(N) vs O(1)) and efficiency (O(N log N) vs O(N)). This wouldn't matter in most use cases. – Jeff Learman Apr 2 '18 at 22:59
  • I should have said "space O(N) vs O(depth)" above, where depth is the depth of the directory tree (comparing this solution to recursive ones.) – Jeff Learman Apr 2 '18 at 23:28
  • 1
    this is elegant, works and does not rely on external libraries. loved it – Leo Feb 12 at 18:48
  • Doesn't this have the problem of file handle leaks? This example does not close the stream returned by Files.walk(), which is explicitly indicated in the API docs. I know that if you don't close the stream returned by Files.list() for example, you can run out of handles and the program will crash. See e.g. stackoverflow.com/q/36990053/421049 and stackoverflow.com/q/26997240/421049 . – Garret Wilson Apr 18 at 21:38
19

Using Apache Commons-IO, it is following one-liner:

import org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils;

FileUtils.forceDelete(new File(destination));

This is (slightly) more performant than FileUtils.deleteDirectory.

  • group: 'commons-io', name: 'commons-io', version: '2.+' - useful – mike rodent Oct 20 '16 at 17:49
9

My basic recursive version, working with older versions of JDK:

public static void deleteFile(File element) {
    if (element.isDirectory()) {
        for (File sub : element.listFiles()) {
            deleteFile(sub);
        }
    }
    element.delete();
}
  • 2
    This will throw a NullPointerException if there is an I/O exception while reading the directory. The code should check whether listFiles() returns null, rather than calling isDirectory(). – mernst Oct 31 '17 at 23:57
8

This is the best solution for Java 7+:

public static void deleteDirectory(String directoryFilePath) throws IOException
{
    Path directory = Paths.get(directoryFilePath);

    if (Files.exists(directory))
    {
        Files.walkFileTree(directory, new SimpleFileVisitor<Path>()
        {
            @Override
            public FileVisitResult visitFile(Path path, BasicFileAttributes basicFileAttributes) throws IOException
            {
                Files.delete(path);
                return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
            }

            @Override
            public FileVisitResult postVisitDirectory(Path directory, IOException ioException) throws IOException
            {
                Files.delete(directory);
                return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
            }
        });
    }
}
6

Guava 21+ to the rescue. Use only if there are no symlinks pointing out of the directory to delete.

com.google.common.io.MoreFiles.deleteRecursively(
      file.toPath(),
      RecursiveDeleteOption.ALLOW_INSECURE
) ;

(This question is well-indexed by Google, so other people usig Guava might be happy to find this answer, even if it is redundant with other answers elsewhere.)

6

As mentioned, Java isn't able to delete a folder that contains files, so first delete the files and then the folder.

Here's a simple example to do this:

import org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils;



// First, remove files from into the folder 
FileUtils.cleanDirectory(folder/path);

// Then, remove the folder
FileUtils.deleteDirectory(folder/path);

Or:

FileUtils.forceDelete(new File(destination));
4

I like this solution the most. It does not use 3rd party library, instead it uses NIO2 of Java 7.

/**
 * Deletes Folder with all of its content
 *
 * @param folder path to folder which should be deleted
 */
public static void deleteFolderAndItsContent(final Path folder) throws IOException {
    Files.walkFileTree(folder, new SimpleFileVisitor<Path>() {
        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFile(Path file, BasicFileAttributes attrs) throws IOException {
            Files.delete(file);
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }

        @Override
        public FileVisitResult postVisitDirectory(Path dir, IOException exc) throws IOException {
            if (exc != null) {
                throw exc;
            }
            Files.delete(dir);
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }
    });
}
2

In this

index.delete();

            if (!index.exists())
               {
                   index.mkdir();
               }

you are calling

 if (!index.exists())
                   {
                       index.mkdir();
                   }

after

index.delete();

This means that you are creating the file again after deleting File.delete() returns a boolean value.So if you want to check then do System.out.println(index.delete()); if you get true then this means that file is deleted

File index = new File("/home/Work/Indexer1");
    if (!index.exists())
       {
             index.mkdir();
       }
    else{
            System.out.println(index.delete());//If you get true then file is deleted




            if (!index.exists())
               {
                   index.mkdir();// here you are creating again after deleting the file
               }




        }

from the comments given below,the updated answer is like this

File f=new File("full_path");//full path like c:/home/ri
    if(f.exists())
    {
        f.delete();
    }
    else
    {
        try {
            //f.createNewFile();//this will create a file
            f.mkdir();//this create a folder
        } catch (Exception e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
2

You can use FileUtils.deleteDirectory. JAVA can't delete the non-empty foldres with File.delete().

1

directry cannot simply delete if it has the files so you may need to delete the files inside first and then directory

public class DeleteFileFolder {

public DeleteFileFolder(String path) {

    File file = new File(path);
    if(file.exists())
    {
        do{
            delete(file);
        }while(file.exists());
    }else
    {
        System.out.println("File or Folder not found : "+path);
    }

}
private void delete(File file)
{
    if(file.isDirectory())
    {
        String fileList[] = file.list();
        if(fileList.length == 0)
        {
            System.out.println("Deleting Directory : "+file.getPath());
            file.delete();
        }else
        {
            int size = fileList.length;
            for(int i = 0 ; i < size ; i++)
            {
                String fileName = fileList[i];
                System.out.println("File path : "+file.getPath()+" and name :"+fileName);
                String fullPath = file.getPath()+"/"+fileName;
                File fileOrFolder = new File(fullPath);
                System.out.println("Full Path :"+fileOrFolder.getPath());
                delete(fileOrFolder);
            }
        }
    }else
    {
        System.out.println("Deleting file : "+file.getPath());
        file.delete();
    }
}
1

If you have subfolders, you will find troubles with the Cemron answers. so you should create a method that works like this:

private void deleteTempFile(File tempFile) {
        try
        {
            if(tempFile.isDirectory()){
               File[] entries = tempFile.listFiles();
               for(File currentFile: entries){
                   deleteTempFile(currentFile);
               }
               tempFile.delete();
            }else{
               tempFile.delete();
            }
        getLogger().info("DELETED Temporal File: " + tempFile.getPath());
        }
        catch(Throwable t)
        {
            getLogger().error("Could not DELETE file: " + tempFile.getPath(), t);
        }
    }
1

You can make recursive call if sub directories exists

import java.io.File;

class DeleteDir {
public static void main(String args[]) {
deleteDirectory(new File(args[0]));
}

static public boolean deleteDirectory(File path) {
if( path.exists() ) {
  File[] files = path.listFiles();
  for(int i=0; i<files.length; i++) {
     if(files[i].isDirectory()) {
       deleteDirectory(files[i]);
     }
     else {
       files[i].delete();
     }
  }
}
return( path.delete() );
}
}
1

we can use the spring-core dependency;

boolean result = FileSystemUtils.deleteRecursively(file);
1

Most of answers (even recent) referencing JDK classes rely on File.delete() but that is a flawed API as the operation may fail silently.
The java.io.File.delete() method documentation states :

Note that the java.nio.file.Files class defines the delete method to throw an IOException when a file cannot be deleted. This is useful for error reporting and to diagnose why a file cannot be deleted.

As replacement, you should favor Files.delete(Path p) that throws an IOException with a error message.

The actual code could be written such as :

Path index = Paths.get("/home/Work/Indexer1");

if (!Files.exists(index)) {
    index = Files.createDirectories(index);
} else {

    Files.walk(index)
         .sorted(Comparator.reverseOrder())  // as the file tree is traversed depth-first and that deleted dirs have to be empty  
         .forEach(t -> {
             try {
                 Files.delete(t);
             } catch (IOException e) {
                 // LOG the exception and potentially stop the processing

             }
         });
    if (!Files.exists(index)) {
        index = Files.createDirectories(index);
    }
}
0

you can try as follows

  File dir = new File("path");
   if (dir.isDirectory())
   {
         dir.delete();
   }

If there are sub folders inside your folder you may need to recursively delete them.

0
private void deleteFileOrFolder(File file){
    try {
        for (File f : file.listFiles()) {
            f.delete();
            deleteFileOrFolder(f);
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace(System.err);
    }
}
0
        import org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils;

        List<String> directory =  new ArrayList(); 
        directory.add("test-output"); 
        directory.add("Reports/executions"); 
        directory.add("Reports/index.html"); 
        directory.add("Reports/report.properties"); 
        for(int count = 0 ; count < directory.size() ; count ++)
        {
        String destination = directory.get(count);
        deleteDirectory(destination);
        }





      public void deleteDirectory(String path) {

        File file  = new File(path);
        if(file.isDirectory()){
             System.out.println("Deleting Directory :" + path);
            try {
                FileUtils.deleteDirectory(new File(path)); //deletes the whole folder
            } catch (IOException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        else {
        System.out.println("Deleting File :" + path);
            //it is a simple file. Proceed for deletion
            file.delete();
        }

    }

Works like a Charm . For both folder and files . Salam :)

0

One more choice is to use Spring's org.springframework.util.FileSystemUtils relevant method which will recursively delete all content of the directory.

File directoryToDelete = new File(<your_directory_path_to_delete>);
FileSystemUtils.deleteRecursively(directoryToDelete);

That will do the job!

-1

Remove it from else part

File index = new File("/home/Work/Indexer1");
if (!index.exists())
{
     index.mkdir();
     System.out.println("Dir Not present. Creating new one!");
}
index.delete();
System.out.println("File deleted successfully");
-1

Some of these answers seem unnecessarily long:

if (directory.exists()) {
    for (File file : directory.listFiles()) {
        file.delete();
    }
    directory.delete();
}

Works for sub directories too.

  • 1
    It only works to one level of sub dirs – Paul Taylor Aug 8 '18 at 8:12
-1
import java.io.File;

public class Main{
   public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
      deleteDir(new File("c:\\temp"));
   }
   public static boolean deleteDir(File dir) {
      if (dir.isDirectory()) {
         String[] children = dir.list();
         for (int i = 0; i < children.length; i++) {
            boolean success = deleteDir (new File(dir, children[i]));

            if (!success) {
               return false;
            }
         }
      }
      return dir.delete();
      System.out.println("The directory is deleted.");
   }
}
-3

You can use this function

public void delete()    
{   
    File f = new File("E://implementation1/");
    File[] files = f.listFiles();
    for (File file : files) {
        file.delete();
    }
}
  • It works fine with a directory with all closed files. But when tried on directory with open files it doesnt work. Can you help me find a way to delete folder inspite of open files – Piyush Rumao Mar 22 '16 at 5:30
  • 2
    This won't delete non-empty subdirectories. – Pang May 14 '16 at 4:39

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