7

I'm trying migrate my data id postgresql from string to integers in django to use them in sphinx search. So first of all I'm making data migration, converting my data to integers in string like this

db.execute('''UPDATE the_table SET foo='1' WHERE foo='bar';''')

Then I'm making schema migration

ALTER TABLE the_table ALTER COLUMN col_name TYPE integer USING (col_name::integer);

like it was told here

But I'm getting an error

ERROR: operator class "varchar_pattern_ops" does not accept data type integer

SQL-состояние: 42804

This error occurs both in South and pgAdmin. The data is correct - it is Null or integer in string type. What am I doing wrong?

  • Which version of postgres? It works fine in 9.3: alter table test alter val type int using (val::int); – Denis de Bernardy Nov 29 '13 at 11:31
  • 9.1.10. I don't understand - the other column is the same table just was converted to integer without errors. But this column is still causing error. – FeroxTL Nov 29 '13 at 11:37
5

I'm only able to reproduce your error message like so:

denis=# create index test_idx on test (val varchar_pattern_ops);
CREATE INDEX
denis=# alter table test alter val type int using (val::int);
ERROR:  operator class "varchar_pattern_ops" does not accept data type integer

If you've a funky index like that, try dropping and recreating it like so:

denis=# drop index test_idx;
DROP INDEX
denis=# create index test_idx on test (val);
CREATE INDEX
denis=# alter table test alter val type int using (val::int);
ALTER TABLE

Related docs:

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/indexes-opclass.html

  • 1
    Yes, this fixed the issue! Thank you! – FeroxTL Nov 29 '13 at 11:47
9

To be deal with this problem you have to use 2 steps of migrations.

First : Add db_index=False on your first migration then generate and run the migration.

Second : Update db_index=True to your related column in model (according to the first step) then generate the migration and run again.

This based on my experience on some project, and it works.

Hope it helps.

  • Perfect, should be the accepted answer since it does not envolves SQL. – Rafael Gonçalves Nov 10 '17 at 16:58
  • I tried this, but for my particular use case where a ForeignKey was a character varying in the PostgreSQL and not a uuid it didn't regen the correct migration files to update the column casting. I had to write pure SQL. I don't feel that great about it though, and am surprised. I would think that the migrations should never get into that state. – Aaron Lelevier Jan 18 '18 at 1:08
  • this worked for me – Anupam May 27 at 8:54

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