122

Is it possible to specify a post-install Python script file as part of the setuptools setup.py file so that a user can run the command:

python setup.py install

on a local project file archive, or

pip install <name>

for a PyPI project and the script will be run at the completion of the standard setuptools install? I am looking to perform post-install tasks that can be coded in a single Python script file (e.g. deliver a custom post-install message to the user, pull additional data files from a different remote source repository).

I came across this SO answer from several years ago that addresses the topic and it sounds as though the consensus at that time was that you need to create an install subcommand. If that is still the case, would it be possible for someone to provide an example of how to do this so that it is not necessary for the user to enter a second command to run the script?

7
  • 4
    I am hoping to automate the script run rather than requiring the user to enter a second command. Any thoughts? Nov 29, 2013 at 16:13
  • 1
    This might be what you're looking for: stackoverflow.com/questions/17806485/…
    – limp_chimp
    Jan 16, 2014 at 17:59
  • 1
    Thank you! I will check it out Jan 17, 2014 at 3:36
  • 1
    If you do need this, this blog post that I found by a quick google looks like it would be useful. (Also see Extending and Reusing Setuptools in the docs.)
    – abarnert
    Aug 27, 2014 at 11:46
  • 1
    @Simon Well, you're looking at a comment from 4 years ago about something that probably isn't what someone with this problem wants, so you can't really expect it to be monitored and kept up to date. If this were an answer, it would be worth the effort to find new resources to replace them, but it's not. If you need the outdated information, you can always use the Wayback Machine, or you can search for the equivalent section in the current docs.
    – abarnert
    Apr 18, 2018 at 18:55

7 Answers 7

108

Note: The solution below only works when installing a source distribution zip or tarball, or installing in editable mode from a source tree. It will not work when installing from a binary wheel (.whl)


This solution is more transparent:

You will make a few additions to setup.py and there is no need for an extra file.

Also you need to consider two different post-installations; one for development/editable mode and the other one for install mode.

Add these two classes that includes your post-install script to setup.py:

from setuptools import setup
from setuptools.command.develop import develop
from setuptools.command.install import install


class PostDevelopCommand(develop):
    """Post-installation for development mode."""
    def run(self):
        develop.run(self)
        # PUT YOUR POST-INSTALL SCRIPT HERE or CALL A FUNCTION

class PostInstallCommand(install):
    """Post-installation for installation mode."""
    def run(self):
        install.run(self)
        # PUT YOUR POST-INSTALL SCRIPT HERE or CALL A FUNCTION

and insert cmdclass argument to setup() function in setup.py:

setup(
    ...

    cmdclass={
        'develop': PostDevelopCommand,
        'install': PostInstallCommand,
    },

    ...
)

You can even call shell commands during installation, like in this example which does pre-installation preparation:

from setuptools import setup
from setuptools.command.develop import develop
from setuptools.command.install import install
from subprocess import check_call


class PreDevelopCommand(develop):
    """Pre-installation for development mode."""
    def run(self):
        check_call("apt-get install this-package".split())
        develop.run(self)

class PreInstallCommand(install):
    """Pre-installation for installation mode."""
    def run(self):
        check_call("apt-get install this-package".split())
        install.run(self)


setup(
    ...

P.S. there are no any pre-install entry points available on setuptools. Read this discussion if you are wondering why there is none.

17
  • 7
    It's up to you: if you call run on the parent first then your command is a post-install, otherwise it's a pre-install. I've updated the answer to reflect this.
    – kynan
    May 22, 2017 at 14:23
  • 2
    using this solution it seems that install_requires dependencies are ignored
    – ealfonso
    Jul 31, 2018 at 16:56
  • 7
    This didn't work for me with pip3. The install script ran when publishing the package, but not when installing it. Apr 13, 2019 at 21:40
  • 4
    Just seem to work with setup.py install and NOT when pip installing the package.
    – Raf
    Aug 28, 2020 at 9:54
  • 2
    @Raf is there a solution that works for both setup.py install and pip install?
    – banskt
    Apr 21, 2021 at 15:19
17

Note: The solution below only works when installing a source distribution zip or tarball, or installing in editable mode from a source tree. It will not work when installing from a binary wheel (.whl)


This is the only strategy that has worked for me when the post-install script requires that the package dependencies have already been installed:

import atexit
from setuptools.command.install import install


def _post_install():
    print('POST INSTALL')


class new_install(install):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(new_install, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        atexit.register(_post_install)


setuptools.setup(
    cmdclass={'install': new_install},
10
  • 1
    @kynan Because setuptools is quite under-documented. Others have already amended their answers on this Q&A with the correct solutions.
    – Apalala
    May 22, 2017 at 23:27
  • 4
    Well the other answers do not work for me: either the post install script is not executed, or the dependencies are not handled anymore. So far, I'll stick to atexit and not redefining install.run() (this is the reason why the dependencies are not handled anymore). In addition, in order to know the install directory, I've put _post_install() as a method of new_install, what lets me access to self.install_purelib and self.install_platlib (don't know which one to use, but self.install_lib is wrong, weirdly).
    – zezollo
    Oct 12, 2017 at 15:12
  • 2
    I was also having problems with dependencies and atexit works for me
    – ealfonso
    Jul 31, 2018 at 20:48
  • 7
    None of the methods here seem to work with wheels. Wheels do not run setup.py so, the messages are only displayed when building, not when installing the package.
    – JCGB
    Mar 4, 2019 at 15:12
  • 1
    Thank you for providing this answer. It works for me (as does the answer provided by @mertyildiran ). One thing i found is that the output of the print statement is only shown if i run pip install in verbose mode, for example: pip3 install -v -e .
    – sunyata
    Jul 21, 2021 at 14:46
8

Note: The solution below only works when installing a source distribution zip or tarball, or installing in editable mode from a source tree. It will not work when installing from a binary wheel (.whl)


A solution could be to include a post_setup.py in setup.py's directory. post_setup.py will contain a function which does the post-install and setup.py will only import and launch it at the appropriate time.

In setup.py:

from distutils.core import setup
from distutils.command.install_data import install_data

try:
    from post_setup import main as post_install
except ImportError:
    post_install = lambda: None

class my_install(install_data):
    def run(self):
        install_data.run(self)
        post_install()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    setup(
        ...
        cmdclass={'install_data': my_install},
        ...
    )

In post_setup.py:

def main():
    """Do here your post-install"""
    pass

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

With the common idea of launching setup.py from its directory, you will be able to import post_setup.py else it will launch an empty function.

In post_setup.py, the if __name__ == '__main__': statement allows you to manually launch post-install from command line.

4
  • 5
    In my case, overriding run() causes the package dependencies not to be installed.
    – Apalala
    Jul 17, 2016 at 14:34
  • 1
    @Apalala that was because the wrong cmdclass was replaced, I've fixed this.
    – kynan
    May 22, 2017 at 14:33
  • 1
    Ah, finally, we find the right answer. How come wrong answers get so many votes on StackOverflow? Indeed, you have to run your post_install() after the install_data.run(self) otherwise you'll be missing some stuff. Like data_files at least. Thank you kynan. Sep 18, 2017 at 16:19
  • 1
    Does not work for me. I guess, for any reason, the command install_data is not executed in my case. So, hasn't atexit the advantage of ensuring the post install script will be executed in the end, in any situation?
    – zezollo
    Oct 12, 2017 at 15:02
3

Combining the answers from @Apalala, @Zulu and @mertyildiran; this worked for me in a Python 3.5 environment:

import atexit
import os
import sys
from setuptools import setup
from setuptools.command.install import install

class CustomInstall(install):
    def run(self):
        def _post_install():
            def find_module_path():
                for p in sys.path:
                    if os.path.isdir(p) and my_name in os.listdir(p):
                        return os.path.join(p, my_name)
            install_path = find_module_path()

            # Add your post install code here

        atexit.register(_post_install)
        install.run(self)

setup(
    cmdclass={'install': CustomInstall},
...

This also gives you access the to the installation path of the package in install_path, to do some shell work on.

4
  • What is my_name here? May 31 at 0:28
  • 1
    my_name is the name of the installed package, and is the same name you parse to the setup function's name keyword parameter.
    – Ezbob
    May 31 at 20:55
  • What if my_name lives inside pyproject.toml and not inside setup.py? Jul 21 at 22:12
  • @IntrastellarExplorer Then you could bootstrap the setup.py file itself from the pyproject.toml by making a script that extracts the package name from the toml file and then creates a setup.py file (possibly from a setup.py.in template file) with the package name embedded in it.
    – Ezbob
    Jul 22 at 19:12
2

I think the easiest way to perform the post-install, and keep the requirements, is to decorate the call to setup(...):

from setup tools import setup


def _post_install(setup):
    def _post_actions():
        do_things()
    _post_actions()
    return setup

setup = _post_install(
    setup(
        name='NAME',
        install_requires=['...
    )
)

This will run setup() when declaring setup. Once done with the requirements installation, it will run the _post_install() function, which will run the inner function _post_actions().

1
  • 1
    Did you try this? I am trying with Python 3.4 and install works as normal but the post_actions are not executed...
    – dojuba
    Jul 26, 2018 at 7:42
1

If using atexit, there is no need to create a new cmdclass. You can simply create your atexit register right before the setup() call. It does the same thing.

Also, if you need dependencies to be installed first, this does not work with pip install since your atexit handler will be called before pip moves the packages into place.

1
  • Like a few suggestions posted here, this one doesn't account for whether or not you are running in "install" mode or not. That's the point of why custom "command" classes are employed.
    – BuvinJ
    Apr 3, 2020 at 14:43
1

I wasn't able to solve a problem with any presented recommendations, so here is what helped me.

You can call function, that you want to run after installation just after setup() in setup.py, like that:

from setuptools import setup

def _post_install():
    <your code>

setup(...)

_post_install()

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.