7

I have a widget containing a QSpinBox. This widget also has a QVector<int> Values. What I would like to do is get the QSpinBox to display values issued from Values only.

At first I thought that a new slot and signal in my widget would do the trick, something like

slot :

void ChangeSomeValue()
{
    // QVector<int> Values;
    // int Index;
    int val = Values[ Index ];
    emit( SomeValueChanged( val ) );
}

connects :

connect( UI->MySpinBox, SIGNAL( valueChanged(int) ), this, SLOT( ChangeSomeValue() ) );
connect( this, SIGNAL( SomeValueChanged(int ) ), UI->MySpinBox, SLOT( setValue(int) ) );

But then several problems arise :

  1. QSpinBox emit another valueChanged after I call its setValue, resulting in an infinite loop (until my QVector explodes).
  2. I still have to find a way to keep track of Index, depending on which of the QSpinBox arrows was clicked (up or down... I don't even think this is possible).

So my solution, with its problems, seems to be a dead end. Any idea?. I'd like to stick to QSpinBox, if possible.

Thanks !

[EDIT]

Subclassing :

class SpinBox : public QSpinBox
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    explicit SpinBox(const QVector<int> & values, QWidget * parent = 0) :
        QSpinBox(parent),
        mValues(values),
        mIndex(0)
    {
        qSort(mValues);
        setMinimum(mValues.at(0));
        setMaximum(mValues.at(mValues.size() - 1));
        setValue(mValues.at(0));
    }

protected:
    void stepBy(int steps) // re-implementaion
    {
        mIndex += steps;
        mIndex = qBound(0, mIndex, mValues.size() - 1);
        setValue(mValues.at(mIndex));
    }

private:
    QVector<int>    mValues;
    int             mIndex;
};

2 Answers 2

6

I Would suggest writing your own class to do it by sub-classing QAbstractSpinBox.

Maybe take a look at the accepted answer on this question: How to subclass QSpinBox so it could have int64 values as maxium and minimum

4
  • Then it may be faster to switch to something like QComboBox. At first I actually started to write the sub-class you suggest, but it looked like a waste of time. Thanks anyway !
    – CTZStef
    Commented Nov 29, 2013 at 16:05
  • Well its probably not a waste of time if you might use this class a lot. Sounds quite useful to me.
    – Pete
    Commented Nov 29, 2013 at 17:38
  • Well, I'll probably give it a chance this week end, if I find some time to spare. I will edit my question accordingly.
    – CTZStef
    Commented Nov 29, 2013 at 19:31
  • @CTZStef Nice. Easier than doing a full subclass or QAbstractSpinBox
    – Pete
    Commented Dec 6, 2013 at 15:24
2

QSpinBox emit another valueChanged after I call its setValue, resulting in an infinite loop (until my QVector explodes).

You can prevent this by using QObject::blockSignals(). Make sure to unblock signals afterwards.

I still have to find a way to keep track of Index, depending on which of the QSpinBox arrows was clicked (up or down... I don't even think this is possible).

Well, I suppose you can store the old value in a member variable, and when QSpinBox emits valueChanged(), you can compare the new to the old value to figure out whether the up or the down arrow was pressed.

That said, I don't know if that's enough to make QSpinBox behave like you want, correcting the value after it was changed once is a bit hacky. Subclassing QAbstractSpinbox might be better indeed.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.