36

I'm trying to implement a numpy function that replaces the max in each row of a 2D array with 1, and all other numbers with zero:

>>> a = np.array([[0, 1],
...               [2, 3],
...               [4, 5],
...               [6, 7],
...               [9, 8]])
>>> b = some_function(a)
>>> b
[[0. 1.]
 [0. 1.]
 [0. 1.]
 [0. 1.]
 [1. 0.]]

What I've tried so far

def some_function(x):
    a = np.zeros(x.shape)
    a[:,np.argmax(x, axis=1)] = 1
    return a

>>> b = some_function(a)
>>> b
[[1. 1.]
 [1. 1.]
 [1. 1.]
 [1. 1.]
 [1. 1.]]

4 Answers 4

42

Method #1, tweaking yours:

>>> a = np.array([[0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5], [6, 7], [9, 8]])
>>> b = np.zeros_like(a)
>>> b[np.arange(len(a)), a.argmax(1)] = 1
>>> b
array([[0, 1],
       [0, 1],
       [0, 1],
       [0, 1],
       [1, 0]])

[Actually, range will work just fine; I wrote arange out of habit.]

Method #2, using max instead of argmax to handle the case where multiple elements reach the maximum value:

>>> a = np.array([[0, 1], [2, 2], [4, 3]])
>>> (a == a.max(axis=1)[:,None]).astype(int)
array([[0, 1],
       [1, 1],
       [1, 0]])
3
  • 2
    Thanks much. Quick question on Method #1: why wouldn't my : slice syntax on the rows do the same thing as providing an array with the row indices themselves?
    – MikeRand
    Nov 30, 2013 at 0:47
  • It seems that method #1 iterates over a just once, while method #2 iterates twice (in max() and in the ==). Is this true? Apr 22, 2016 at 8:19
  • Using range is actually 13% slower in my tests
    – endolith
    Aug 11, 2019 at 3:23
7

I prefer using numpy.where like so:

a[np.where(a==np.max(a))] = 1
2
  • I guess this iterates twice over a? Apr 22, 2016 at 8:11
  • This leaves all other values unchanged; e.g. starting with [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], you end up with [1, 2, 3, 4, 1]. Jan 11 at 11:52
4

a==np.max(a) will raise an error in the future, so here's a tweaked version that will continue to broadcast correctly.

I know this question is pretty ancient, but I think I have a decent solution that's a bit different from the other solutions.

# get max by row and convert from (n, ) -> (n, 1) which will broadcast
row_maxes = a.max(axis=1).reshape(-1, 1)
np.where(a == row_maxes, 1, 0)
np.where(a == row_maxes).astype(int)

if the update needs to be in place, you can do

a[:] = np.where(a == row_maxes, 1, 0)
2
  • 4
    Instead of a.max(axis=1).reshape(-1, 1) you can do a.max(axis=1, keepdim=True).
    – a_guest
    Jan 6, 2019 at 1:45
  • 2
    @a_guest Typo there. It's keepdims Jul 22, 2019 at 12:05
0
b = (a == np.max(a))

That worked for me

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.