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If I do the following:

var abs = Math.abs;

Shoudn't abs(-10) be faster than Math.abs(-10)? Because abs is called directly.

This is what called my attention: Math.abs vs custom abs function Result of a test done at jsperf.com

Update:

The same test performed in the Internet Explorer 11 shows a completely different result: Result of a test done at jsperf.com

I'd speculate that this is due to some optimizations on built-in functions in Chrome's V8 Engine.

A test created by nnnnnn that clarifies what I am trying to say: Property shortcut Result of a test done at jsperf.com

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    Why would it be faster to use an additional variable to call the same function. I don't think you understand how caching and passing by reference works.
    – adeneo
    Commented Nov 30, 2013 at 14:42
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    "Shoudn't abs(-10) be faster than Math.abs(-10)?" Err, why on earth would you think that? Because it's fewer characters?
    – user229044
    Commented Nov 30, 2013 at 14:42
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    Just to be pedantic, JavaScript functions don't have "owners".
    – Pointy
    Commented Nov 30, 2013 at 14:49
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    @adeneo - Yes, here's a test where it's faster (in Chrome) for a simple object with one method: jsperf.com/property-shortcut
    – nnnnnn
    Commented Nov 30, 2013 at 14:51
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    I'd speculate that Chrome's JS to native code compiler has some intrinsic code for Math primitives and will inline the calls. Putting the function into a variable defeats that optimization somehow. Note that in Firefox they have identical performance.
    – Boann
    Commented Nov 30, 2013 at 17:53

1 Answer 1

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This answer was rendered useless by Givi. See comments.

Looking up a user-defined function in a user-defined object is slower than looking up a function bound to a local variable, so you were mostly right.

However, looking up Math.* functions is faster, most probably because of internal optimizations of the V8 engine (so "caching" built-in functions in a local variable is actually slower, while "caching" user-defined functions is faster).

Edit: here's a jsperf demonstrating how Math.* functions are faster than their var x = Math.x counterparts, while doing the same for user defined function is not. It's just how V8 works imho. test results

Edit #2: just now i noticed this line from your question:

I'd speculate that this is due to some optimizations on built-in functions in Chrome's V8 Engine.

I'm not 100% sure, but it definitely looks that way, yes.

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    Open your javascript console and put this script... ### (function() { for (var i = 100000000, start = new Date().getTime(); i > 0; i--) { Math.abs(-111); } var end = new Date().getTime(); var result = end - start; console.log(result); }()); ### for checking Math.abs and this one for var abs = Math.abs; ### (function() { var abs = Math.abs; for (var i = 100000000, start = new Date().getTime(); i > 0; i--) { abs(-111); } var end = new Date().getTime(); var result = end - start; console.log(result); }());###
    – Givi
    Commented Dec 2, 2013 at 13:18
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    Math.abs -> 23609 ; var abs = Math.abs -> 1125 . That nails it... so i guess jsperf is not to be trusted. Thanks Givi. Commented Dec 2, 2013 at 13:38
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    look at jsFiddle would be better if you copy source and paste directly to javascript console.
    – Givi
    Commented Dec 2, 2013 at 13:45
  • I'm sorry, I made a mistake. Testing code directly in console is bad idea, so would be better if you create new html file and then pass source in empty body tag. source code
    – Givi
    Commented Dec 2, 2013 at 13:57
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    Running your jsFiddle, on my machine at least, they yield similar results, so Math.abs is 0% faster than var abs = Math.abs, tested with different numbers of loops. This can only mean that the environment the javascript runs in makes quite a difference in processing speed. That means any performance tests that we make should either account for the environment or are not to be taken as absolute/irrevocable results (also depends on the tests themselves of course). This was quite enlightening Givi, thank you :) Commented Dec 4, 2013 at 9:28

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