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Been teaching myself 3d programming with a minecraft-clone game. I have an infinite map, loaded in chunks of 16x16x64 blocks.

As the player (the camera) walks around, the center of the camera (the game cursor) points at a block. I'm trying to figure out how to determine which block the user is pointing at.

I have a camera with a 3d coordinate, yaw, pitch, so I know where the user is looking.

I've tried finding coordinates that would be on a "line" drawn from that origin point but that doesn't account for when the camera points at the edges/corners of a block, the system won't know.

I've tried looking for examples online but I'm not finding anything useful, a few examples but they're extremely buggy and poorly documented.

How can I properly convert where the center of the camera is looking into which block/face it's looking at?

  • What technology are you using? Is this pure Java or are you using OpenGL as well? – TheSuccessor Dec 4 '13 at 21:11
  • Java with LWJGL, so OpenGL. I've since found a few more examples on gamedev, reddit, and the one Bukkit uses for Minecraft. I've made one based on the ideas in those examples and have things close... I have a feeling that the small errors I'm seeing are due to different/incorrect values trying to represent the current camera height. I need to work on syncing those better tonight, see what I can get – helion3 Dec 4 '13 at 23:11
  • As Jacqui mentioned ray casting is probably what you are looking for. That said you normally pick with a cursor (mouse position) + camera parameter and not with camera parameters only. Then cast a cone or ray (a narrow cone) and check for intersection with your cone. If you want example code of this method look into openGL frameworks which implement this as part of their API (OSG (open scene graph) has one for example, but it's C++) – count0 Dec 9 '13 at 19:56
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"I've tried finding coordinates that would be on a "line" drawn from that origin point but that doesn't account for when the camera points at the edges/corners of a block, the system won't know." .. "How can I properly convert where the center of the camera is looking into which block/face it's looking at?"

The two common ways that OpenGL programs do mouse picking is either colour picking or ray casting. It sounds like you are trying to iterate through your block grid to get the position which is a bit unusual, or want to do something like ray casting.

Ray casting is done from the camera -> through the mouse -> onto a plane on the screen -> map screen space to world space -> collide with scene

"I've tried looking for examples online but I'm not finding anything useful, a few examples but they're extremely buggy and poorly documented."

Here are some links to some ray casting tutorials one with maths and diagrams, one with some code examples, and another.

Note that if you find any older OpenGL tutorials, they might mention "selection mode" or the "name stack" which is really old, don't use it - OpenGL wiki.

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There is a Minecraft type clone called CraftMania that is open source at https://github.com/mcourteaux/CraftMania

There might be some documented information about 3D picking.

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First, a note on the camera height question: be sure to keep camera position and pointing in the ModelView matrix and not in the Projection matrix. The Projection matrix should only be used to compensate for your human eye relative to your real screen (frustum). "Zooming" is a trickier subject.

The previous answer's links show how to get the line of sight vector from the camera, looking into the model space (center of screen or cross hairs).

Call this line of sight vector l. It should be a unit column vector, expressed in the same coordinate frame as your blocks. In terms of yaw(h for heading) and pitch(p), if +y is up, and 0 yaw has -z forward and x right, then the (x,y,z) components of l are: l = (cp*sh, sp, -cp*ch), where cp is cos(pitch), sh is sin(yaw=heading), etc.

We want the nearest cube in front of the camera that has any face(s) pierced by a ray from the camera in the direction of l.

At every step, you want to rule out cubes to consider, to save throughput. OpenGL has a way to tell if a primitive (e.g. triangle) writes to the depth buffer (is visible). If you want to, you could render twice, and note the cubes that write to the depth buffer under a *-or-equal rule on the second pass, and only consider those cubes. If not, you can skip that and just consider all cubes.

If you don't have a limited number of your 16x16x64 chunks already selected, you could consider large cubic block chunks (e.g. 16^3) to reject as a whole first, using the coarse method below for single blocks, with the acceptance threshold scaled up by e.g. 16.

Assume a cube is 2x2x2 units (corners at center +/- 1 in x,y,z). The camera "eye" is at position e. For every cube, with center at c, compute displacement from the eye: d = c - e. Compute distance in the direction of l: u = d dot l. (i.e. u = dx*lx + dy*ly + dz*lz.) Discard this cube if u < -1.5 (cube is entirely behind the camera). Compute the perpendicular displacement vector of the cube center from the ray: p = d - u*l.

Coarse check: Discard the cube if the sum of the absolute values of the components of p is > 3. This is a fast check that will eliminate all but cubes which are very close to the line of sight ray.
Sort all remaining cubes by smallest to greatest u.
The first of these to pass the following detailed check wins.

Detailed check: You first have to do some preparation based on your l vector, before processing any cubes: Designate the 8 corner vertex numbers and position vectors universal to all cubes as follows:

no  x  y  z
1   1  1  1
2   1 -1  1
3   1 -1 -1
4   1  1 -1
5  -1  1  1
6  -1 -1  1
7  -1 -1 -1
8  -1  1 -1

Next, choose the 4 or 6 vertices forming the 2-D convex hull of precise collision, as seen by the eye, based on the signs of the x,y,z components of l:

xyz Vertices (cyclic)
+++ 234856
--- 658432 (reverse order of +++)
++- 123785 (6->1, 4->7) of +++
--+ 587321 reverse order of ++-
+-+ 156734
-+- 437651 reverse of +-+
-++ 148762
+-- 267841 reverse of -++

Degenerate cases, when any 2 of l's x,y,or z components are zero:

+00 1234
-00 4321
0+0 1485
0-0 5841
00+ 1562
00- 2651

Select one of the above 14 hulls, once, based on your line of sight l vector. Then do the following detailed test for each of the remaining range-sorted cubes. Now, for the ray to be within this hull, meaning at least one face of the cube is pierced (or at least grazed), the ray must be to the left of each line segment specified by subsequent pairs of the vertices of the hull (6 or 4 checks) as we go around the hull counter-clockwise. This is the same as requiring the the cross product of the hull segment with the displacement from either end of that segment to the ray has negative or zero projection into the line of sight vector l: Taking the hull vertices in pairs from left to right, and wrapping around from the last to the first, the leftmost vertex designated "a" and the right one "b", ((b - a) cross (p - a)) dot l <= 0. (same "p" as above, p = d - u*l. p may be stored from above, or recomputed here.) The first cube, taken in order from nearest to farthest, to have all 4 or 6 line segments of the hull pass this test is the cube in front of the player. The four or six (b - a) vectors may be pre-computed (once). You can also come up with sets of 4 vertices for the degenerate cases where only one of the components of l is zero, but that is optional, unlike the cases where two components of l are zero, where you must only use 4 vertices.

This is all on paper, not coded or tested.

  • No response? Does this need explanation at points, or to be broken down into more bite (block) sized chunks? :) – PaulQ Dec 12 '13 at 19:11

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