269

1) When an array is passed as an argument to a method or function, is it passed by reference, or by value?

2) When assigning an array to a variable, is the new variable a reference to the original array, or is it new copy?
What about doing this:

$a = array(1,2,3);
$b = $a;

Is $b a reference to $a?

  • Also see When-does-foreach-copy – nawfal Nov 18 '15 at 14:07
  • 3
    @MarlonJerezIsla: looks like the Array is only cloned if you modify it inside the function. Still coming from other languages, it seems weird. – user276648 Nov 22 '16 at 3:40
282

For the second part of your question, see the array page of the manual, which states (quoting) :

Array assignment always involves value copying. Use the reference operator to copy an array by reference.

And the given example :

<?php
$arr1 = array(2, 3);
$arr2 = $arr1;
$arr2[] = 4; // $arr2 is changed,
             // $arr1 is still array(2, 3)

$arr3 = &$arr1;
$arr3[] = 4; // now $arr1 and $arr3 are the same
?>


For the first part, the best way to be sure is to try ;-)

Consider this example of code :

function my_func($a) {
    $a[] = 30;
}

$arr = array(10, 20);
my_func($arr);
var_dump($arr);

It'll give this output :

array
  0 => int 10
  1 => int 20

Which indicates the function has not modified the "outside" array that was passed as a parameter : it's passed as a copy, and not a reference.

If you want it passed by reference, you'll have to modify the function, this way :

function my_func(& $a) {
    $a[] = 30;
}

And the output will become :

array
  0 => int 10
  1 => int 20
  2 => int 30

As, this time, the array has been passed "by reference".


Don't hesitate to read the References Explained section of the manual : it should answer some of your questions ;-)

| improve this answer | |
  • what about something like $a = &$this->a. Is $a now a reference to &this->a? – Frank Jan 8 '10 at 21:40
  • 1
    As you are using the &, yes, it should -- see php.net/manual/en/… – Pascal MARTIN Jan 8 '10 at 21:42
  • 1
    holy cow, i can't believe this is the problem i had... should this be a lesson, always read the offing manual – Heavy_Bullets Feb 1 '14 at 19:38
  • 2
    Hi Pascal, I found Kosta Kontos's answer seems to be more accurate. I do a simple quick test to confirm his finding gist.github.com/anonymous/aaf845ae354578b74906 Can you comment on his finding too? – Cheok Yan Cheng May 29 '14 at 10:38
  • 1
    This is the problem I was having too: thought it was something weird about nested arrays but it was actually just how array assignment works in PHP. – Jeremy List Jul 23 '15 at 7:45
126

With regards to your first question, the array is passed by reference UNLESS it is modified within the method / function you're calling. If you attempt to modify the array within the method / function, a copy of it is made first, and then only the copy is modified. This makes it seem as if the array is passed by value when in actual fact it isn't.

For example, in this first case, even though you aren't defining your function to accept $my_array by reference (by using the & character in the parameter definition), it still gets passed by reference (ie: you don't waste memory with an unnecessary copy).

function handle_array($my_array) {  

    // ... read from but do not modify $my_array
    print_r($my_array);

    // ... $my_array effectively passed by reference since no copy is made
}

However if you modify the array, a copy of it is made first (which uses more memory but leaves your original array unaffected).

function handle_array($my_array) {

    // ... modify $my_array
    $my_array[] = "New value";

    // ... $my_array effectively passed by value since requires local copy
}

FYI - this is known as "lazy copy" or "copy-on-write".

| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    This is a super interesting piece of information! Looks like it's true; but I couldn' find any official documentation supporting this fact. We also need to know which versions of PHP support this lazy copy concept. Anyone has more info? – Mario Awad Feb 15 '13 at 12:00
  • 8
    Update, found some official documentation, still need to find which version of PHP supports lazy copy (they call it "copy on write" in the manual): php.net/manual/en/internals2.variables.intro.php – Mario Awad Feb 15 '13 at 12:06
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    This is purely an implementation decision of the PHP virtual machine, and not part of the language - it isn't actually visible to the programmer. Copy-on-write is certainly recommended for performance reasons, but an implementation that copies every array has no difference from the perspective of the programmer, so we can say that the language semantics specify pass-by-value. – Superfly Sep 16 '15 at 1:29
  • 17
    @Superfly it certainly makes a difference when I want to know whether I can pass my 100MB array through a stack of dozens of functions without running out of memory! You may be right that it is nonetheless right to call the semantics pass-by-value, but leaving aside such quibbles over terminology, the "implementation detail" mentioned here certainly does matter to PHP programmers in the real world. – Mark Amery Jan 2 '16 at 0:22
  • 3
    There's another quirk to this, which makes being aware of copy-on-write even more important when thinking about performance. You might think passing arrays by reference saves memory compared to passing by value (if you didn't know about copy-on-write) but it can actually have the opposite effect! If the array is subsequently passed by value (by your own or 3rd party code), PHP then has to make a full copy or it can no longer track the reference count! More here: stackoverflow.com/questions/21974581/… – Dan King Feb 23 '18 at 15:58
83

TL;DR

a) the method/function only reads the array argument => implicit (internal) reference
b) the method/function modifies the array argument => value
c) the method/function array argument is explicitly marked as a reference (with an ampersand) => explicit (user-land) reference

Or this:
- non-ampersand array param: passed by reference; the writing operations alter a new copy of the array, copy which is created on the first write;
- ampersand array param: passed by reference; the writing operations alter the original array.

Remember - PHP does a value-copy the moment you write to the non-ampersand array param. That's what copy-on-write means. I'd love to show you the C source of this behaviour, but it's scary in there. Better use xdebug_debug_zval().

Pascal MARTIN was right. Kosta Kontos was even more so.

Answer

It depends.

Long version

I think I'm writing this down for myself. I should have a blog or something...

Whenever people talk of references (or pointers, for that matter), they usually end up in a logomachy (just look at this thread!).
PHP being a venerable language, I thought I should add up to the confusion (even though this a summary of the above answers). Because, although two people can be right at the same time, you're better off just cracking their heads together into one answer.

First off, you should know that you're not a pedant if you don't answer in a black-and-white manner. Things are more complicated than "yes/no".

As you will see, the whole by-value/by-reference thing is very much related to what exactly are you doing with that array in your method/function scope: reading it or modifying it?

What does PHP says? (aka "change-wise")

The manual says this (emphasis mine):

By default, function arguments are passed by value (so that if the value of the argument within the function is changed, it does not get changed outside of the function). To allow a function to modify its arguments, they must be passed by reference.

To have an argument to a function always passed by reference, prepend an ampersand (&) to the argument name in the function definition

As far as I can tell, when big, serious, honest-to-God programmers talk about references, they usually talk about altering the value of that reference. And that's exactly what the manual talks about: hey, if you want to CHANGE the value in a function, consider that PHP's doing "pass-by-value".

There's another case that they don't mention, though: what if I don't change anything - just read?
What if you pass an array to a method which doesn't explicitly marks a reference, and we don't change that array in the function scope? E.g.:

<?php
function readAndDoStuffWithAnArray($array) 
{
    return $array[0] + $array[1] + $array[2];
}

$x = array(1, 2, 3);

echo readAndDoStuffWithAnArray($x);

Read on, my fellow traveller.

What does PHP actually do? (aka "memory-wise")

The same big and serious programmers, when they get even more serious, they talk about "memory optimizations" in regards to references. So does PHP. Because PHP is a dynamic, loosely typed language, that uses copy-on-write and reference counting, that's why.

It wouldn't be ideal to pass HUGE arrays to various functions, and PHP to make copies of them (that's what "pass-by-value" does, after all):

<?php

// filling an array with 10000 elements of int 1
// let's say it grabs 3 mb from your RAM
$x = array_fill(0, 10000, 1); 

// pass by value, right? RIGHT?
function readArray($arr) { // <-- a new symbol (variable) gets created here
    echo count($arr); // let's just read the array
}

readArray($x);

Well now, if this actually was pass-by-value, we'd have some 3mb+ RAM gone, because there are two copies of that array, right?

Wrong. As long as we don't change the $arr variable, that's a reference, memory-wise. You just don't see it. That's why PHP mentions user-land references when talking about &$someVar, to distinguish between internal and explicit (with ampersand) ones.

Facts

So, when an array is passed as an argument to a method or function is it passed by reference?

I came up with three (yeah, three) cases:
a) the method/function only reads the array argument
b) the method/function modifies the array argument
c) the method/function array argument is explicitly marked as a reference (with an ampersand)


Firstly, let's see how much memory that array actually eats (run here):

<?php
$start_memory = memory_get_usage();
$x = array_fill(0, 10000, 1);
echo memory_get_usage() - $start_memory; // 1331840

That many bytes. Great.

a) the method/function only reads the array argument

Now let's make a function which only reads the said array as an argument and we'll see how much memory the reading logic takes:

<?php

function printUsedMemory($arr) 
{
    $start_memory = memory_get_usage();

    count($arr);       // read
    $x = $arr[0];      // read (+ minor assignment)
    $arr[0] - $arr[1]; // read

    echo memory_get_usage() - $start_memory; // let's see the memory used whilst reading
}

$x = array_fill(0, 10000, 1); // this is 1331840 bytes
printUsedMemory($x);

Wanna guess? I get 80! See for yourself. This is the part that the PHP manual omits. If the $arr param was actually passed-by-value, you'd see something similar to 1331840 bytes. It seems that $arr behaves like a reference, doesn't it? That's because it is a references - an internal one.

b) the method/function modifies the array argument

Now, let's write to that param, instead of reading from it:

<?php

function printUsedMemory($arr)
{
    $start_memory = memory_get_usage();

    $arr[0] = 1; // WRITE!

    echo memory_get_usage() - $start_memory; // let's see the memory used whilst reading
}

$x = array_fill(0, 10000, 1);
printUsedMemory($x);

Again, see for yourself, but, for me, that's pretty close to being 1331840. So in this case, the array is actually being copied to $arr.

c) the method/function array argument is explicitly marked as a reference (with an ampersand)

Now let's see how much memory a write operation to an explicit reference takes (run here) - note the ampersand in the function signature:

<?php

function printUsedMemory(&$arr) // <----- explicit, user-land, pass-by-reference
{
    $start_memory = memory_get_usage();

    $arr[0] = 1; // WRITE!

    echo memory_get_usage() - $start_memory; // let's see the memory used whilst reading
}

$x = array_fill(0, 10000, 1);
printUsedMemory($x);

My bet is that you get 200 max! So this eats approximately as much memory as reading from a non-ampersand param.

| improve this answer | |
  • Saved me a couple of hours in debug of a memory leak! – Ragen Dazs Jan 2 '17 at 20:05
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    Kosta Kontos: This is such an important question that you should mark this as the accepted answer. That said, @nevvermind: Great essay, but please include a top TL;DR section. – AVIDeveloper Jan 19 '17 at 16:43
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    @nevvermind: I'm not an acronym groopy, the main diff is that Conclusions appear usually at the end of an article, while TL;DR appears as the first line for those who just need to short answer instead of going through a lengthy analysis. Your research is good and this is not criticism, just my $00.02. – AVIDeveloper Mar 7 '17 at 15:52
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    You're right. I've put the conclusions at the top. But I'd still like people to stop being lazy in read the whole thing, before reaching to any conclusion. Scrolling is too easy for us to bother changing the order of things. – nevvermind Mar 8 '17 at 12:09
  • 1
    I guess PHP has gotten more efficient years later because your codepad examples give much lower numbers :) – drzaus May 5 '17 at 8:11
15

By default

  1. Primitives are passed by value. Unlikely to Java, string is primitive in PHP
  2. Arrays of primitives are passed by value
  3. Objects are passed by reference
  4. Arrays of objects are passed by value (the array) but each object is passed by reference.

    <?php
    $obj=new stdClass();
    $obj->field='world';
    
    $original=array($obj);
    
    
    function example($hello) {
        $hello[0]->field='mundo'; // change will be applied in $original
        $hello[1]=new stdClass(); // change will not be applied in $original
        $
    }
    
    example($original);
    
    var_dump($original);
    // array(1) { [0]=> object(stdClass)#1 (1) { ["field"]=> string(5) "mundo" } } 
    

Note: As an optimization, every single value is passed as reference until its modified inside the function. If it's modified and the value was passed by reference then, it's copied and the copy is modified.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    This answer should be +1'ed to the top. It contains an obscure gotcha that other answers do not mention: "4 - Arrays of objects are passed by value (the array) but each object is passed by reference." I was scratching my head because of that one! – augustin Jun 20 '16 at 6:22
  • @magallanes great should be rated first for me too, you clarify me a trouble of objects array that I had. Is there any way to modify an object in an array just in one of the two array variables (the original and the copy)? – fede72bari Sep 13 '19 at 8:18
5

When an array is passed to a method or function in PHP, it is passed by value unless you explicitly pass it by reference, like so:

function test(&$array) {
    $array['new'] = 'hey';
}

$a = $array(1,2,3);
// prints [0=>1,1=>2,2=>3]
var_dump($a);
test($a);
// prints [0=>1,1=>2,2=>3,'new'=>'hey']
var_dump($a);

In your second question, $b is not a reference to $a, but a copy of $a.

Much like the first example, you can reference $a by doing the following:

$a = array(1,2,3);
$b = &$a;
// prints [0=>1,1=>2,2=>3]
var_dump($b);
$b['new'] = 'hey';
// prints [0=>1,1=>2,2=>3,'new'=>'hey']
var_dump($a);
| improve this answer | |
2

To extend one of the answers, also subarrays of multidimensional arrays are passed by value unless passed explicitely by reference.

<?php
$foo = array( array(1,2,3), 22, 33);

function hello($fooarg) {
  $fooarg[0][0] = 99;
}

function world(&$fooarg) {
  $fooarg[0][0] = 66;
}

hello($foo);
var_dump($foo); // (original array not modified) array passed-by-value

world($foo);
var_dump($foo); // (original array modified) array passed-by-reference

The result is:

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  array(3) {
    [0]=>
    int(1)
    [1]=>
    int(2)
    [2]=>
    int(3)
  }
  [1]=>
  int(22)
  [2]=>
  int(33)
}
array(3) {
  [0]=>
  array(3) {
    [0]=>
    int(66)
    [1]=>
    int(2)
    [2]=>
    int(3)
  }
  [1]=>
  int(22)
  [2]=>
  int(33)
}
| improve this answer | |
1

This thread is a bit older but here something I just came across:

Try this code:

$date = new DateTime();
$arr = ['date' => $date];

echo $date->format('Ymd') . '<br>';
mytest($arr);
echo $date->format('Ymd') . '<br>';

function mytest($params = []) {
    if (isset($params['date'])) {
        $params['date']->add(new DateInterval('P1D'));
    }
}

http://codepad.viper-7.com/gwPYMw

Note there is no amp for the $params parameter and still it changes the value of $arr['date']. This doesn't really match with all the other explanations here and what I thought until now.

If I clone the $params['date'] object, the 2nd outputted date stays the same. If I just set it to a string it doesn't effect the output either.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    The array is copied, but it's not a deep copy. This means that primitive values like numbers and strings are copied into $param, but for objects, the reference is copied instead of the object being cloned. $arr is holding a reference to $date, and so is the copied array $params. So when you call a function on $params['date'] that alters its value, you're also changing $arr['date'] and $date. When you set $params['date'] to a string, you're just replacing $params's reference to $date with something else. – ejegg Jan 16 '15 at 19:40
1

In PHP arrays are passed to functions by value by default, unless you explicitly pass them by reference, as the following snippet shows:

$foo = array(11, 22, 33);

function hello($fooarg) {
  $fooarg[0] = 99;
}

function world(&$fooarg) {
  $fooarg[0] = 66;
}

hello($foo);
var_dump($foo); // (original array not modified) array passed-by-value

world($foo);
var_dump($foo); // (original array modified) array passed-by-reference

Here is the output:

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  int(11)
  [1]=>
  int(22)
  [2]=>
  int(33)
}
array(3) {
  [0]=>
  int(66)
  [1]=>
  int(22)
  [2]=>
  int(33)
}
| improve this answer | |

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