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I'm using .{0,70}(?:\\S(?:-| |$)|$) to match the strings like a/n b/n c/n but only the last string is matched i.e c.

For example:

hello(newline)world(NL)java(NL)

only matches java but when i modify the regex to .{0,70}(?:\\S(?:|-| |$)|$) it works perfectly fine.Can any one explain this

  • 4
    I think you forgot to ask a question. :) – Burhan Khalid Dec 1 '13 at 12:16
  • I've seen this question at least 2 times. Where in the world are you getting it ? – HamZa Dec 1 '13 at 12:17
  • The 2nd one definitely doesn't do what you want. Having a | with nothing on one side allows the alternation to match nothing. Its unclear, at least to me, what you're trying to do though. – OGHaza Dec 1 '13 at 12:18
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    @Hamza I mean that (|x) means match x or nothing. – OGHaza Dec 1 '13 at 12:19
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    @user2531406 wow, so with /n you mean newline :O Dude, you're mixing everything up. To represent a newline use \n. Now why don't you write your own regex for your specific situation and stop ripping regex from the internetz ? – HamZa Dec 1 '13 at 12:37
2

Your second regex "works" because you added an empty alternative to the alternation, i.e. it went from (a|b) to (a|b|), which will match at a or b or "nothing" (zero-width, it doesn't have to be a space character or anything, it will match between characters).

It doesn't work, but . matchs anything except newlines, and all your lines end in a non-whitespace character so .{0,70}\S+"nothing" will always match.

Your requirements are too unclear for me to give you a definitive answer (I'm not sure where the space and - in the alternation come into it). But if you're literally just trying to match whatever appears on a line I see no reason why you can't just use .*\S (which will give you the similar matches to your "working" regex). But if .*\S fulfills your needs you should probably just be splitting the string by the newline character and the right trimming it.

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  • Could it be our confused OP is looking for the Single Line Modifier, whatever it is in the as yet to be named programming language? (OP: "regex" is not a programming language per se.) – usr2564301 Dec 1 '13 at 13:49

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