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This question is related to this other question: PHP's magic method __call on subclasses, but I'm not satisfied with the accepted answer.

What I'm trying to do is implement a generic way to create method aliases, without having to define a named function for every alias, using the magic __call method.

This system would use an associative array as a lookup table in the form of "alias" => "actualMethod.

abstract class Super {

    private $aliases;

    protected function __construct(array $aliases) {
        $this->aliases = $aliases;
    }

    public function __call($name, $arguments) {

        /* if $name is an alias, replace it */
        if (isset($this->aliases[$name])) {
            $name = $this->aliases[$name];
        }

        /* throw an exception if the method is undefined */
        if (!method_exists($this, $name)) {
            throw new Exception("The specified method or method alias is undefined in the current context");
        }

        /* finally, call the method by its actual name */
        return $this->$name($arguments);
    }

}

The problem seems to be that either me or the PHP guys don't understand polymorphism.

class Sub extends Super {

    public function __construct() {
        parent::__construct(array(
            "alias" => "actualMethod"
        ));
    }

    private function actualMethod() {
        echo "Inside the actual method";
    }

}

When I define the __call method on an abstract class, then define the actualMethod on a subclass, PHP enters an infinite recursion loop inside __call when I try to invoke the actualMethod by its alias.

try {
    $object = new Sub();
    $object->alias(); /* causes infinite __call recursion inside Super */
} catch (Exception $exc) {
    echo $exc->getTraceAsString();
}

This is funny, because the call to method_exists inside __call returns TRUE.

Surely I can't be the first person to notice this behavior, right? What's the deal here?

EDIT

So basically, normal inheritance rules don't apply for magic methods? It seems that I can't call private methods further down the inheritance tree from inside __call() (*). However I can still call private methods if they are defined in the same class.

(*): even though __call is public, and the object is an instance of the subclass where the private method is defined.

How does that work exactly?

  • The example code given here seems to work fine, as shown in this online evaluator. – IMSoP Dec 1 '13 at 21:25
  • What the... I don't know how that's possible. The only thing I can think of is that my real code is using namespaces while the examples are not. – Steven Liekens Dec 1 '13 at 23:20
  • I cracked the case. My actual methods are private, so for whatever reason they are invisible to whatever mechanism is responsible for triggering __call. You can verify this behavior by changing the scope of actualMethod to private. The fix/hack from my answer still works. I don't know if the bug in this case is that the problem exists or that a workaround exists. Food for thought. – Steven Liekens Dec 2 '13 at 0:05
  • Ah, that makes a lot more sense - and goes to show that you should always test any simplified examples before you post them. If a method is private in Sub, then it is invisible to Super - private scopes to the current class, not the current object. – IMSoP Dec 2 '13 at 10:27
  • Then shouldn't method_exists() in Super return false? – Steven Liekens Dec 2 '13 at 10:39
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Yes, this is weird - I don't have an answer to why, but a workaround for your problem could be:

    /* finally, call the method by its actual name */
    return call_user_func_array(array($this, $name), $arguments);
  • Same problem. My code always goes straight back to __call instead of checking whether the method exists inside Sub. Very frustrating... – Steven Liekens Dec 1 '13 at 15:12
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Looks like I found a way to do it. I'm not sure if it is the way to do it or just a dirty hack. Anyway:

class Sub extends Super {

    public function __construct() {
        parent::__construct(array(
            "alias" => "actualMethod"
        ));
    }

    public function __call($name, $arguments) {
        if (!method_exists($this, $name)) {
            return parent::__call($name, $arguments);
        }
        return $this->$name($arguments);
    }

    private function actualMethod() {
        echo "Inside the actual method";
    }

}

This works by only calling the __call method inside Sub if the specified method does not exist already in either Sub or Super. When it doesn't, the Sub::__call() is invoked, which in turn invokes Super::__call. The result is that either an exception is thrown, or control is handed back to Sub::__call which then invokes the actualMethod().

I hope that made sense.

EDIT

I completely forgot to add return keywords in my examples. Obviously these are crucial if you're trying to return anything other than void.

  • By definition, method_exists($this, $name) will never return true at the very top of that __call method, as __call is only called if the method doesn't exist. – IMSoP Dec 1 '13 at 21:28
  • You are partially right. The check is pointless on the first time (when $name=="alias"), but the parent::__call() will result in __call being triggered again. Only this time, $name=="actualMethod". If that sounds weird to you, it's because it should. I'm pretty damn sure by now that this is a bug. – Steven Liekens Dec 1 '13 at 23:12

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