6

I happened to write a if-else statement, the condition would be false at most time(check a static pointer is assigned or not). Which one would be better for the compiler to optimize? Or they are just equal?. The function would be called so many times, so it is critical to optimize its performance.

void foo() {
  static int * p = NULL;
  if (p == NULL) {
     p = (int *) malloc( SIZE * sizeof(int)); 
  }
  //do something here
} 

void foo() {
  static int * p = NULL;
  if (p != NULL) {
    //do something here 
  } else {
    p = (int *) malloc( SIZE * sizeof(int));  
    //do something
  }
}
  • 2
    Use gcc file.c -S -o file.S to generate the assembly language code for your C source. And observe the pattern of instruction generated. Also try compiling after enabling optimization flags -O2, and then see. – Don't You Worry Child Dec 2 '13 at 9:39
  • 1
    I'd prefer the first one, not for speed (it's almost the same) but for the logic – Thomas Ayoub Dec 2 '13 at 9:39
  • 3
    Aside from the sweating a jz vs jnz instruction, these two things are not even equivalent. You will have to double your non-null-case code effort in the second example, since everything being done in the non-null-case will have to be done following allocation in the null-case. Thus, to me, the only one of these that makes sense at all is the first one, and it has nothing to do with performance. – WhozCraig Dec 2 '13 at 9:43
  • In general I wouldn't worry about these sort of optimization issues unless I was using a prehistoric compiler, but like @WhozCraig notes, your two examples aren't equivalent. – sashang Dec 2 '13 at 9:46
  • 2
    If you are using gcc, you should take a look at the likely()/unlikely() macros. [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/1668013/… – Sevauk Dec 2 '13 at 9:52
5

Some compilers can allow the dev to specify which is condition is more likely or unlikely to occur. This is heavily used in the Linux kernel.

In gcc, there's the likely(x) or unlikely(x) macros. Example:

if (unlikely(p == NULL)) {
    p = malloc(10);
}
  • Furthermore compilers with the PGO (Profile Guided Optimization) will do that automatically if you have a good test case. – Alex Dec 2 '13 at 9:58
2

If the function is called often enough to not be evicted from the branch predictor, then the predictor will take care of everything for you, since it will learn very quickly which is the "likely" branch.

Some compilers allow you to decorate conditionals with prediction hints. Check your vendor's documentation, and add a hint if you can.

Specific platforms document the default predictor behaviour (e.g. see the Intel Optimization Manual for x86), but it's best left to your compiler to implement that via the aforementioned hints. In fact, you don't really have a choice, since you don't control your compilers code generation anyway, so the only last measure left to you would be to write the code in machine code yourself and implement the platform's advice on default prediction.

1

At the end, it depends on the compiler and the optimization it does, which changes from compiler version, processor, compiler family...

My rule of thumb on this kind of subjects is to check on your actual platform by doing some extensive profiling. I usually also follow the rule "code first correctly, optimize later only if required". Trying to optimize upfront often leads to less readable code and design (and sometime, not even better performance).

0

Conditions are checked in order from left to right, this is in the C standard, thus allowing for conditionals like

if( ptr != NULL && ptr->member == value )

This also means that it makes sense to place the condition which is most likely to be false first.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2bxt6kc4.aspx

  • This is true for && operator while for || operator is true the opposite, as with OR operator no matter the others, when the first is 1 the condition is true. – Jekyll Dec 2 '13 at 9:49
0

If the function gets called often, any decent branch predictor would learn to predict the common path very quickly. Note that the code may be compiled differently than you expect since some compilers rely on static branch prediction, and may recognize this pattern.

0

If you looking for performance I wouldn't use malloc at all. Get Huge chunk of RAM and use it directly without allocation deallocation wrappers. Also consider using macros code will be bigger but performance also will increase.

#define ASSURE_PTR(a)      if (!a){ \
        a = (int *) malloc (SIZE * sizeof(int)); \
    }
  • 3
    Premature optimization, on just about the lowest possible level. – usr2564301 Dec 2 '13 at 9:45
  • 1
    Though foo will be called too many times, malloc only be called once. It is critically necessary to optimize it here? – Zhiwen Fang Dec 2 '13 at 9:51
  • Make it as macros. Why u make call? – Boris Ivanov Dec 2 '13 at 10:02
  • Here "Do something" is really to do many things. So it maybe not easy to make macros here or even inline. – Zhiwen Fang Dec 2 '13 at 10:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.