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If I have a vector v with names:

John       Murray     Lisa       Mike       Joe       Ann 
0.0832090  0.0475580 -0.2797860  0.1086225  0.0104590 -0.0028250 

What is time complexity of v['Joe'] versus v[4]? I guess the former would take O(log n) as it should involves binary search, but I'm still not sure whether the latter is O(1) or not.

Also, does the result generalize to the case when v is a list/data frame rather than an atomic vector?

1 Answer 1

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It seems to be approximately O(n), i.e. a vector scan, in the case of name look ups. Your conjecture of O(1) for lookup using indices seems sound...

#  Unique names for longish vector
nms <- apply( expand.grid( letters , letters , letters , letters ) , 1 , paste , collapse = "" )
length(nms)
#[1] 456976
length(unique(nms))
#[1] 456976

#  Start of names
head(nms)
#[1] "aaaa" "baaa" "caaa" "daaa" "eaaa" "faaa"

#  End of names
tail(nms)
#[1] "uzzz" "vzzz" "wzzz" "xzzz" "yzzz" "zzzz"

#  Large named vector
x <- setNames( runif( 456976 ) , nms )

#  Small named vector
y <- setNames( runif(26) , letters )

#  Timing information
require( microbenchmark )
bm <- microbenchmark( x['daaa'] , x[4] , x['vzzz'] , x[456972] , y['d'] , y[4] )
print( bm , order = 'median' , unit = 'relative' , digits = 3 )
#Unit: relative
#      expr min       lq   median       uq      max neval
# x[456972] NaN 1.00e+00     1.00     1.00    1.000   100
#      x[4] Inf 1.00e+00     1.33     1.07    0.957   100
#      y[4] NaN 5.01e-01     1.33     1.14    0.191   100
#    y["d"] Inf 1.00e+00     2.00     1.25    0.265   100
# x["vzzz"] Inf 6.57e+04 44412.24  9969.64 3439.154   100
# x["daaa"] Inf 6.59e+04 44582.73 10049.63 1207.337   100
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  • 2
    Great! Thanks for answer.. Also, you help me to learn a way to experiment with this kind of question. This would be really useful in future!!
    – chanp
    Commented Dec 2, 2013 at 10:36
  • It's a bit more complicated than that. See stackoverflow.com/questions/3470447 for details. Also note that subsetting n times is much slower than doing a single subset with n values.
    – hadley
    Commented Dec 2, 2013 at 13:20
  • @hadley this code only does a single subset for each test. The value you see is the average time taken across 100 runs? And the accepted answer in the link draws the same conclusion. O(1) and O(n). I don't see your point. And I would've thought that x[n] simply adds an offset of n to the pointer address of the first address of the vector, hence the O(1). Commented Dec 2, 2013 at 13:23
  • @SimonO101 x[letters] is not the same as for (letter in letters) x[letter] - access might be in O(n) in one, but O(1) in the other. Benchmarking extracting a single value isn't terribly realistic, since you normally subset by many values - and you can't extrapolate the performance from subsetting by a single value.
    – hadley
    Commented Dec 2, 2013 at 21:31
  • @hadley That sounds interesting. But does this mean that for each access in for-loop, x[letter] is faster than when it appears outside a loop? Can you please elaborate on that?
    – chanp
    Commented Dec 3, 2013 at 11:09

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