1093

Moving on in my attempt to learn Android, I just read the following:

Question: Does the user have a choice to kill the application unless we put a menu option in to kill it? If no such option exists, how does the user terminate the application?

Answer: (Romain Guy): The user doesn't, the system handles this automatically. That's what the activity lifecycle (especially onPause/onStop/onDestroy) is for. No matter what you do, do not put a "quit" or "exit" application button. It is useless with Android's application model. This is also contrary to how core applications work.

Hehe, for every step I take in the Android world I run into some sort of problem =(

Apparently, you cannot quit an application in Android (but the Android system can very well totally destroy your app whenever it feels like it). What's up with that? I am starting to think that it's impossible to write an app that functions as a "normal app" - that the user can quit the app when he/she decides to do so. That is not something that should be relied upon the OS to do.

The application I am trying to create is not an application for the Android Market. It is not an application for "wide use" by the general public, it is a business app that is going to be used in a very narrow business field.

I was actually really looking forward to developing for the Android platform, since it addresses a lot of issues that exist in Windows Mobile and .NET. However, the last week has been somewhat of a turnoff for me... I hope I don't have to abandon Android, but it doesn't look very good right now =(

Is there a way for me to really quit the application?

38 Answers 38

2

This is quite simple. Just follow these instruction which I am going to tell you:

Like you are having multiple activities, to go from one activity to another. You might be using the intent like this:

Intent i1 = new Intent(this, AnotherActivity);
startActivity(i1) 

You have just to add finish(); after starting the intent activity on each and every activity from start to end, for example,

Intent i1=new Intent(this, AnotherActivity);
startActivity(i1) 
finish();

So whenever you will click that exit button which is using finish() or System.exit(0) that must close your application completely.

  • 2
    Why are you calling finish() right after startActivity(i1)? What is the goal here? – IgorGanapolsky Sep 12 '12 at 17:48
2

For the first (starting ) activity of the application,

@Override
public void onBackPressed(){

    // Exit
    moveTaskToBack(true);
}

worked for me. I want to close the app here. And to come back from other activites; I used intents, e.g.

@Override
public void onBackPressed(){

    // Going back....
    Intent intent = new Intent(ActivityB.this, ActivityA.class);
    startActivity(intent);
    finish();
}

Note: This code is useful for the scenario where the developer wants to come back from ActivityZ to ActivityA and then close the app.

1

Use this code:

Intent i = new Intent();
i.setAction(Intent.ACTION_MAIN);
i.addCategory(Intent.CATEGORY_HOME);
ListActivity.this.startActivity(i);
finish();
  • Did you try that? And shouldn't a finish() in the activity that is called first be enough? – Heiko Rupp Feb 8 '12 at 12:18
  • 3
    This code just minimize the app, it don't do an exit. :P – Harpreet Mar 28 '12 at 11:21
  • I tried this but 3 threads were still left running even thought the activities closed. It may have appeared to work when running under the debugger, but in normal use, when I queried running processes from another app, it's still running. – Andy Joiner Jan 16 '13 at 11:12
0

If you specify API >= 16, Activity#finishAffinity() meets your needs.

0

Currently I implemented the following in my app. May these helps to move out from the application from whereever you want. I am calling this function from action bar Menus.

public static void exitApplication(Context context) {
    if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.HONEYCOMB) {
        exitApplicationHC(context);
    }
    else {
        exitApplicationPreHC(context);
    }
}

private static void exitApplicationPreHC(Context context) {
    Intent i = new Intent(context, LoginActivity.class);
    i.putExtra(EXTRA_EXIT, true);
    i.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_TOP);
    i.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK);
    context.startActivity(i);
    if (context instanceof Activity) {
        ((Activity) context).finish();
    }
}

@TargetApi(Build.VERSION_CODES.HONEYCOMB)
private static void exitApplicationHC(Context context) {
    Intent i = new Intent(context, LoginActivity.class);
    i.putExtra(EXTRA_EXIT, true);
    i.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_TOP);
    i.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK);
    i.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_TASK);
    context.startActivity(i);
}
0

You can use Process.killProcess(Process.myPid()); to kill your app, but maybe it is not safe? I didn't encounter any problem or crash after I used this method and after I used this, the process of my app in the DDMS list disappeared.

0

Another Option can be Android Accessibility Services Which Greenify Application is using to Force close applications to speedup memory. With having your application accessibility service access you can click on buttons so basically Greenify Application clicks on the force close Button found in settings of an application:

Here you can study accessibility services: https://developer.android.com/reference/android/accessibilityservice/AccessibilityService.html

Here is the Setting Button which accessibility service clicks programitically: enter image description here

So You can Achieve Killing any Application Including Yours By the following Steps:

1) Register Application for Accessibility Services 2) Depending on your requirements if you want to kill all application get list of All Packages 3) Navigate to their Settings Screen And Click Force Close Button Thats It. I can Share a sample code I also created an application like greenify as an home assignment. Thank you

Update: "The user doesn't, the system handles this automatically." So Basically with this solution we are indirectly using system force close but on the User Demand. So That Both Stay Happy :-)

-1

One of the important reasons to have the exit button is the "on exit" advertisment. On the exit, it is possible to display some revenue-generating ad. It is still somewhat annoying, like all ads are, but may be less annoying than something that keeps hanging around all time, using precious screen space. Some ad networks offer this way of advertisement. But, really, you cannot just put an exit button that does nothing after showing that ad!

As a result, one or another way to terminate the program is required in some cases, and "should never be needed" may not be the most comprehensive answer.

Activity.finish() or System.exit(0) could probably be used.

  • 4
    On exit advertisement is not the reason Android-exiting is so badly needed. – Pacerier Nov 17 '14 at 10:49

protected by Lalit Poptani Mar 14 '16 at 11:56

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