6

I have a multidimensional array:

[[7,3], [7,3], [3,8], [7,3], [7,3], [1,2]]

Is there any smart way to remove duplicated elements from this? It should return such array:

[[7,3], [3,8], [1,2]]

Thanks!

closed as off-topic by Kevin B, raam86, showdev, kjhughes, m59 Dec 3 '13 at 1:35

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Kevin B, raam86, showdev, kjhughes, m59
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • @Matt: I read this topic before, but it's about a simple array, not a multidimensional. – Michał Kalinowski Dec 2 '13 at 22:55
  • Iterate over every entry in the array, looking for duplicates. it's the only way. – Kevin B Dec 2 '13 at 23:12
  • @kalinowski5 You're absolutely right - sorry for the false lead. See my answer for one way to do it. – Matt Dec 2 '13 at 23:15
  • Does order matter? e.g. what about [[7, 3], [3, 7]]? Do you want to treat that as two distinct elements, or duplicate elements? – Sean Dec 2 '13 at 23:15
8
arr = [[7,3], [7,3], [3,8], [7,3], [7,3], [1,2]];

function multiDimensionalUnique(arr) {
    var uniques = [];
    var itemsFound = {};
    for(var i = 0, l = arr.length; i < l; i++) {
        var stringified = JSON.stringify(arr[i]);
        if(itemsFound[stringified]) { continue; }
        uniques.push(arr[i]);
        itemsFound[stringified] = true;
    }
    return uniques;
}

multiDimensionalUnique(arr);

Explaination:

Like you had mentioned, the other question only dealt with single dimension arrays.. which you can find via indexOf. That makes it easy. Multidimensional arrays are not so easy, as indexOf doesn't work with finding arrays inside.

The most straightforward way that I could think of was to serialize the array value, and store whether or not it had already been found. It may be faster to do something like stringified = arr[i][0]+":"+arr[i][1], but then you limit yourself to only two keys.

  • This is brilliant! – Morfinismo Sep 15 '18 at 17:57
3

This requires JavaScript 1.7:

var arr = [[7,3], [7,3], [3,8], [7,3], [7,3], [1,2]];

arr.map(JSON.stringify).reverse().filter(function (e, i, a) {
    return a.indexOf(e, i+1) === -1;
}).reverse().map(JSON.parse) // [[7,3], [3,8], [1,2]]
1
var origin = [[7,3], [7,3], [3,8], [7,3], [7,3], [1,2]];

function arrayEqual(a, b) {
    if (a.length !== b.length) { return false; }
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; ++i) {
        if (a[i] !== b[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

function contains(array, item) {
    for (var i = 0; i < array.length; ++i) {
        if (arrayEqual(array[i], item)) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

function normalize(array) {
    var result = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < array.length; ++i) {
        if (!contains(result, array[i])) {
            result.push(array[i]);
        }
    }
    return result;
}

var result = normalize(origin);
console.log(result);

http://jsfiddle.net/2UQH6/

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