23

I have a question regarding enum (it might be a simple one but ....). This is my program:

public class Hello { 
         public enum MyEnum 
         { 
               ONE(1), TWO(2); 
               private int value; 
               private MyEnum(int value) 
               { 
                    System.out.println("hello");  
                    this.value = value; 
               } 
               public int getValue() 
               { 
                    return value; 
               } 
        } 
        public static void main(String[] args)  
        { 
              MyEnum e = MyEnum.ONE; 
        } 
}

and my question is: Why the output is

hello
hello

and not

hello ?

How the code is "going" twice to the constructor ? When is the first time and when is the second ? And why the enum constructor can not be public ? Is it the reason why it print twice and not one time only ?

3
  • 6
    change to System.out.println("hello " + value ); then it will be clear to you
    – qwr
    Dec 3, 2013 at 7:13
  • You'll also note that declaring an instance of your enum as you do in main() has no effect. Comment out that line, and the constructor will still run twice. Dec 3, 2013 at 18:21
  • Think about why you wrote ONE(1), not ONE("one") or ONE()?
    – StarPinkER
    Dec 7, 2013 at 3:17

3 Answers 3

29

Enums are Singletons and they are instanciated upon loading of the class - so the two "hello"s come from instanciating MyEnum.ONE and MyEnum.TWO (just try printing value as well).

This is also the reason why the constuctor must not be public: the Enum guarantees there will ever only be one instance of each value - which it can't if someone else could fiddle with the constructor.

1
  • enum class is sloser to multiton pattern ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiton_pattern ) rather than singleton. As piet.t mentioned there is no sense in making enum's constructor public because you can't directly create new instances of enum. Also enum is automatically "static" and in some way "final". In your case "MyEnum" class is definetly "final". But, if you add abstract method to it (yes, enums can have abstract methods) or override "getValue" in ONE or TWO it technically would not be "final": the compiler will generate additional classes, inherited from "MyEnum". Dec 3, 2013 at 8:41
11

How the code is "going" twice to the constructor ?

Conctructor is invoked for each element of enum. Little change your example for demonstration it:

public class Hello { 
    public enum MyEnum { 
        ONE(1), TWO(2); 
        private int value; 
        private MyEnum(int value) { 
            this.value = value;
            System.out.println("hello "+this.value);  
        } 
        public int getValue() { 
            return value; 
        } 
    } 
    public static void main(String[] args) { 
        MyEnum e = MyEnum.ONE; 
    } 
}

Output:

hello 1
hello 2
3

Your constructor invoke twice. The moment of loading your Enum class it will invoke number of time which equals to number of enum types here.

 MyEnum e = MyEnum.ONE; // singleton instance of Enum

consider following

public class Hello {

public enum MyEnum
{
    ONE(1), TWO(2), THREE(3);
    private int value;
    private MyEnum(int value)
    {
        System.out.println("hello"+value);
        this.value = value;
    }
    public int getValue()
    {
        return value;
    }
}
public static void main(String[] args)
{
    MyEnum e = MyEnum.ONE;
}

}

Out put

hello1
hello2
hello3

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