56

e.g.

class Foo { public async Task Bar() { await Task.Delay(500); } }

If we are reflecting over this class and method, how can I determine if this is an actual async/await method rather than simply a method that happens to return a Task?

class Foo { public Task Bar() { return Task.Delay(500); } }
8
  • 1
    At the end of the day, why is it important to you? async is an implementation detail of the method, and should be changeable without any consumers caring. Dec 3, 2013 at 13:11
  • Because I'm writing an IoC interceptor which is trying to track the start and end of a method call. Dec 3, 2013 at 13:28
  • 4
    But if you consider that an async method isn't really "complete" until the task that it returns completes, why should you not also treat any method that returns a Task as incomplete until the task completes? Consider also that a non-async method returning Task may do a few simple things itself and then defer the bulk of its work to an async internal method, and just pass back to its caller the Task created by that method - are you planning to try to detect such a situation? Dec 3, 2013 at 13:46
  • 1
    The whole point is that I want to distinguish between such methods. A method's job may be to create a Task and return that back out to the call, as opposed to some method who is performing some work and doing an await inside it. Dec 4, 2013 at 10:58
  • But the whole point I was trying to make is that this is an arbitrary distinction that you're drawing. Two classes can implement the same interface. One may choose to use async, the other may choose to not do so. Both are fulfilling the same contract, so why should they be treated differently? And, 6 months later, either or both of those classes may have had their implementations changed and added or removed the async keyword - but it doesn't change the contractual behaviour that they're providing. Dec 4, 2013 at 18:10

3 Answers 3

67

In my copy of your code, the MethodInfo for the async method contains the following items in the CustomAttributes property:

  • a DebuggerStepThroughAttribute
  • a AsyncStateMachineAttribute

whereas the MethodInfo for the normal method contains no items in its CustomAttributes property.

It seems like the AsyncStateMachineAttribute should reliably be found on an async method and not on a standard one.

Edit: In fact, that page even has the following in the examples!

As the following example shows, you can determine whether a method is marked with Async (Visual Basic) or async (C# Reference) modifier. In the example, IsAsyncMethod performs the following steps:

  • Obtains a MethodInfo object for the method name by using Type.GetMethod.

  • Obtains a Type object for the attribute by using GetType Operator (Visual Basic) or typeof (C# Reference).

  • Obtains an attribute object for the method and attribute type by using MethodInfo.GetCustomAttribute. If GetCustomAttribute returns Nothing (Visual Basic) or null (C#), the method doesn't contain the attribute.

private static bool IsAsyncMethod(Type classType, string methodName)
{
    // Obtain the method with the specified name.
    MethodInfo method = classType.GetMethod(methodName);

    Type attType = typeof(AsyncStateMachineAttribute);

    // Obtain the custom attribute for the method. 
    // The value returned contains the StateMachineType property. 
    // Null is returned if the attribute isn't present for the method. 
    var attrib = (AsyncStateMachineAttribute)method.GetCustomAttribute(attType);

    return (attrib != null);
}
6
  • Beauty, thanks. I thought I had checked custom attributes but I had checked those of the Task that was returned rather than the MethodInfo - doh! Dec 3, 2013 at 13:27
  • uhm.. if method.GetCustomAttribute(attType) returns null, casting it will yield an exception. thus, the attrib != null is redundant. Use 'as'? Or even better, use GetCustomAttribute<AsyncStateMachineAttribute>()
    – HelloWorld
    Aug 31, 2015 at 8:03
  • @EmilMüller Casting null won't throw, although you're right that it's not necessary. It's just tidy to cast it to the type you've just asked for. The generic version didn't exist at the time of this answer.
    – Rawling
    Sep 1, 2015 at 7:23
  • Are you sure this is also the case for methods that return a Task, i.e. are awaitable, but not async? Like Task Func2() => Func1(); style redirects.
    – ygoe
    Jun 24, 2018 at 18:02
  • 1
    @ygoe no. That's exactly what the asker wants to be able to distinguish.
    – Rawling
    Jun 24, 2018 at 20:39
35

Damien_The_Unbeliever threw an interesting challenge. I think checking for AsyncStateMachineAttribute isn't a sufficient solution. The original question shouldn't be whether the method is async. Instead it should be whether it's awaitable. Both method samples in Damien's answer will return true if you check for the method GetAwaiter() on the return type. However, only the method marked async will include the AsyncStateMachineAttribute in the custom attributes collection.

Knowing if the method is awaitable is important if you want to use MethodInfo.Invoke() to call the method and you don't know ahead of time if methods that might be registered to a message broker are awaitable.

var isAwaitable = _methodInfo.ReturnType.GetMethod(nameof(Task.GetAwaiter)) != null;

object result = null;
if (isAwaitable)
{
    result = await (dynamic)_methodInfo.Invoke(_instance, _parameterArray);
}
else
{
    result = _methodInfo.Invoke(_instance, _parameterArray);
}

EDIT: Good idea to check the return type on MethodInfo. This is my revised code.

var isAwaitable = _methodInfo.ReturnType.GetMethod(nameof(Task.GetAwaiter)) != null;

object invokeResult = null;
if (isAwaitable)
{
    if (_methodInfo.ReturnType.IsGenericType)
    {
        invokeResult = (object)await (dynamic)_methodInfo.Invoke(_instance, arguments);
    }
    else
    {
        await (Task)_methodInfo.Invoke(_instance, arguments);
    }
}
else
{
    if (_methodInfo.ReturnType == typeof(void))
    {
        _methodInfo.Invoke(_instance, arguments);
    }
    else
    {
        invokeResult = _methodInfo.Invoke(_instance, arguments);
    }
}
4
  • 5
    Though this isn't exactly what was being asked, this is a very good point. It's typically more useful to know if the result is awaitable not whether the method is marked as async.
    – pushkin
    Feb 14, 2019 at 15:19
  • 1
    I think I see your point: Since await can be called on anything returning a Task; not just async methods, then when creating a tool to detect such behavior, one need not know if the method is async or not (unless that is the sole goal of the tool, for something like a static code analysis rule). Sep 23, 2021 at 21:40
  • However, this is exactly not what OP asked. Sep 23, 2021 at 21:41
  • 1
    It's not exactly what they asked, but I think it's more useful. Sep 29, 2021 at 23:56
10

Here's an example of two methods, and I'm asking you why you think that they should be treated differently:

    public static async Task<int> M1(int value)
    {
        await Task.Delay(20000);
        return value;
    }

    public static Task<int> M2(int value)
    {
        return Task.Delay(20000).ContinueWith<int>(_=>value);
    }

They both have, to within a handwave, the exact same runtime behaviour - for 20 seconds they do nothing (and don't hold onto a thread during that period) and then they run a small delegate that just passes back the value that was initially passed to the method.

And yet, you're going to treat one vastly differently from the other because I choose to use the compiler to hide some of the plumbing?

3
  • Does this count as different behaviour? (Although apparently if it is, you can still get around it and get "identical" behaviour to async.)
    – Rawling
    Dec 5, 2013 at 8:26
  • @Rawling - yes, i did consider adding something to configure the await, but that's why I left it as "within a handwave" for now - and, of course, via reflection (the tool the OP is using) there's no way to know what the async method is doing in terms of schedulers, unless you want to decompile the actual code of the method. Dec 5, 2013 at 9:25
  • Ah OK, I missed the handwave :)
    – Rawling
    Dec 5, 2013 at 10:26

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