13

I have a problem where I have a bunch of lengths and want to start at the origin (pretend I'm facing to the positive end of the y axis), I make a right and move positively along the x axis for the distance of length_i. At this time I make another right turn, walk the distance of length_i and repeat n times. I can do this but I think there's a more efficient way to do it and I lack a math background:

## Fake Data
set.seed(11)
dat <- data.frame(id = LETTERS[1:6], lens=sample(2:9, 6), 
    x1=NA, y1=NA, x2=NA, y2=NA)

##   id lens x1 y1 x2 y2
## 1  A    4 NA NA NA NA
## 2  B    2 NA NA NA NA
## 3  C    5 NA NA NA NA
## 4  D    8 NA NA NA NA
## 5  E    6 NA NA NA NA
## 6  F    9 NA NA NA NA

## Add a cycle of 4 column    
dat[, "cycle"] <- rep(1:4, ceiling(nrow(dat)/4))[1:nrow(dat)]

##For loop to use the information from cycle column
for(i in 1:nrow(dat)) {

    ## set x1, y1
    if (i == 1) {
       dat[1, c("x1", "y1")] <- 0
    } else {
       dat[i, c("x1", "y1")] <- dat[(i - 1), c("x2", "y2")]
    }

    col1 <- ifelse(dat[i, "cycle"] %% 2 == 0, "x1", "y1")
    col2 <- ifelse(dat[i, "cycle"] %% 2 == 0, "x2", "y2")
    dat[i, col2] <- dat[i, col1]

    col3 <- ifelse(dat[i, "cycle"] %% 2 != 0, "x2", "y2")
    col4 <- ifelse(dat[i, "cycle"] %% 2 != 0, "x1", "y1")
    mag <- ifelse(dat[i, "cycle"] %in% c(1, 4), 1, -1)
    dat[i, col3] <- dat[i, col4] + (dat[i, "lens"] * mag)

}

This gives the desired result:

> dat

  id lens x1 y1 x2 y2 cycle
1  A    4  0  0  4  0     1
2  B    2  4  0  4 -2     2
3  C    5  4 -2 -1 -2     3
4  D    8 -1 -2 -1  6     4
5  E    6 -1  6  5  6     1
6  F    9  5  6  5 -3     2

Here it is as a plot:

library(ggplot2); library(grid)
ggplot(dat, aes(x = x1, y = y1, xend = x2, yend = y2)) + 
    geom_segment(aes(color=id), size=3, arrow = arrow(length = unit(0.5, "cm"))) + 
    ylim(c(-10, 10)) + xlim(c(-10, 10))

This seems slow and clunky. I'm guessing there's a better way to do this than the items I do in the for loop. What's a more efficient way to keep making programatic rights?

enter image description here

1
  • 1
    You are just adding two dimensional vectors. (There is not a two dimensional vector class in R but either a matrix or complex numbers could do this for you. Try Reduce(cumsum,...,accumulate=TRUE) on the x and y coordinates
    – IRTFM
    Dec 3 '13 at 21:28
10

(As suggested by @DWin) Here is a solution using complex numbers, which is flexible to any kind of turn, not just 90 degrees (-pi/2 radians) right angles. Everything is vectorized:

set.seed(11)
dat <- data.frame(id = LETTERS[1:6], lens = sample(2:9, 6),
                                     turn = -pi/2)

dat <- within(dat, { facing   <- pi/2 + cumsum(turn)
                     move     <- lens * exp(1i * facing)
                     position <- cumsum(move)
                     x2       <- Re(position)
                     y2       <- Im(position)
                     x1       <- c(0, head(x2, -1))
                     y1       <- c(0, head(y2, -1))
                   })

dat[c("id", "lens", "x1", "y1", "x2", "y2")]
#   id lens x1 y1 x2 y2
# 1  A    4  0  0  4  0
# 2  B    2  4  0  4 -2
# 3  C    5  4 -2 -1 -2
# 4  D    8 -1 -2 -1  6
# 5  E    6 -1  6  5  6
# 6  F    9  5  6  5 -3

The turn variable should really be considered as an input together with lens. Right now all turns are -pi/2 radians but you can set each one of them to whatever you want. All other variables are outputs.


Now having a little fun with it:

trace.path <- function(lens, turn) {
  facing   <- pi/2 + cumsum(turn)
  move     <- lens * exp(1i * facing)
  position <- cumsum(move)
  x        <- c(0, Re(position))
  y        <- c(0, Im(position))

  plot.new()
  plot.window(range(x), range(y))
  lines(x, y)
}

trace.path(lens = seq(0, 1,  length.out = 200),
           turn = rep(pi/2 * (-1 + 1/200), 200))

enter image description here

(My attempt at replicating the graph here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turtle_graphics)

I also let you try these:

trace.path(lens = seq(1, 10, length.out = 1000),
           turn = rep(2 * pi / 10, 1000))

trace.path(lens = seq(0, 1,  length.out = 500),
           turn = seq(0, pi, length.out = 500))

trace.path(lens = seq(0, 1,  length.out = 600) * c(1, -1),
           turn = seq(0, 8*pi, length.out = 600) * seq(-1, 1, length.out = 200))

Feel free to add yours!

2
  • 1
    @DWin -- I've got my hand raised ;) At my first glance, I assumed Tyler was beginning to implement Logo in R. Dec 3 '13 at 23:14
  • I got way more responses than I expected. All solutions worked and should be considered by future searchers. For my needs this solution was the best approach. Thank you all. Dec 4 '13 at 6:39
8

This is yet another method using complex numbers. You can rotate a vector "to the right" in the complex plane by multiplying by -1i. The code below makes the first traversal go in the positive X (the Re()-al axis) and each subsequent traversal would be rotated to the "right"

imVecs <- lengths*c(0-1i)^(0:3)
imVecs
# [1]  9+0i  0-5i -9+0i  0+9i  8+0i  0-5i -8+0i  0+7i  8+0i  0-1i -5+0i  0+3i  4+0i  0-7i -4+0i  0+2i
#[17]  3+0i  0-7i -5+0i  0+8i

cumsum(imVecs)
# [1] 9+0i 9-5i 0-5i 0+4i 8+4i 8-1i 0-1i 0+6i 8+6i 8+5i 3+5i 3+8i 7+8i 7+1i 3+1i 3+3i 6+3i 6-4i 1-4i
#[20] 1+4i
plot(cumsum(imVecs))
lines(cumsum(imVecs))

enter image description here

This is the approach to using complex plane rotations to do 45 degree turns to the right:

> sqrt(-1i)
[1] 0.7071068-0.7071068i
> imVecs <- lengths*sqrt(0-1i)^(0:7)
Warning message:
In lengths * sqrt(0 - (0+1i))^(0:7) :
  longer object length is not a multiple of shorter object length
> plot(cumsum(imVecs))
> lines(cumsum(imVecs))

And the plot:

enter image description here

5

This isn't a pretty plot, but I've included it to show that this 'vectorized' coordinate calculation produces correct results which shouldn't be too hard to adapt to your needs:

xx <- c(1,0,-1,0)
yy <- c(0,-1,0,1)

coords <- suppressWarnings(cbind(x = cumsum(c(0,xx*dat$lens)), 
                                 y = cumsum(c(0,yy*dat$lens))))
plot(coords, type="l", xlim=c(-10,10), ylim=c(-10,10))

enter image description here

3

It might be useful to think about this in terms of distance and bearing. Distance is given by dat$lens, and bearing is the angle of movement relative to some arbitrary reference line (say, the x-axis). Then, at each step,

x.new = x.old + distance * cos(bearing)
y.new = y.old + distance * sin(bearing)
bearing = bearing + increment

Here, since we start at the origin and move in the +x direction, (x,y)=(0,0) and bearing starts at 0 degrees. A right turn is simply a bearing increment of -90 degrees (-pi/2 radians). So in R code, using your definition of dat:

x <-0
y <- 0
bearing <- 0
for (i in 1:nrow(dat)){
  dat[i,c(3,4)] <- c(x,y)
  length <- dat[i,2]
  x <- x + length * cos(bearing)
  y <- y + length * sin(bearing)
  dat[i,c(5,6)] <- c(x,y)
  bearing <- bearing - pi/2
}

This produces what you had and has the advantage that you can update it very simply to make left turns, or 45 degree turns, or whatever. You can even add a bearing.increment column to dat to create a random walk.

3
  • +1; This is entirely analogous to the complex numbers approach I sugggested. To change the bearing argument you just need to have the series of vectors multiplying the length vectors all have length-one.
    – IRTFM
    Dec 3 '13 at 22:18
  • Yes, but this can also be extended to 3 dimensions (or n dimensions for that matter). I don't believe the complex number approach has that flexibility.
    – jlhoward
    Dec 3 '13 at 22:22
  • Ah, good point. Rotations in 3-space are incredibly complex. You might need such to model fighter plane game physics. I wonder if there is a 3D solution (probably not in R) in one of the other stackexchange forums?
    – IRTFM
    Dec 3 '13 at 22:26
1

Very similar to Josh's solution:

lengths <- sample(1:10, 20, repl=TRUE)
x=cumsum(lengths*c(1,0,-1,0))
y=cumsum(lengths*c(0,1,0,-1))
cbind(x,y)
      x  y
 [1,] 9  0
 [2,] 9  5
 [3,] 0  5
 [4,] 0 -4
 [5,] 8 -4
 [6,] 8  1
 [7,] 0  1
 [8,] 0 -6
 [9,] 8 -6
[10,] 8 -5
[11,] 3 -5
[12,] 3 -8
[13,] 7 -8
[14,] 7 -1
[15,] 3 -1
[16,] 3 -3
[17,] 6 -3
[18,] 6  4
[19,] 1  4
[20,] 1 -4

Base graphics:

plot(cbind(x,y))
arrows(cbind(x,y)[-20,1],cbind(x,y)[-20,2], cbind(x,y)[-1,1], cbind(x,y)[-1,2] )

enter image description here

This does highlight the fact that both Josh's and my solutions are "turning the wrong way", so you need to change the signs on our "transition matrices". And we probably should have started at (0,0), but You should have not trouble adapting this you your needs.

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