18

It is incorrect by design to have async call within TestInitialize, as TestInitialize has to happen before any TestMethod and have fixed signature.

Can this be correct approach in any way to have async TestInitialize as well?

    private int val = 0;

    [TestInitialize]
    public async Task  TestMehod1()
    {
        var result = await LongRunningMethod();
        val = 10;
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void  TestMehod2()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(10, val);
    }

Any thoughts?

1
  • This is incorrect: "... has wrong signature. The method must be non-static, public, does not return a value and should not take any parameter."
    – DanielV
    Mar 3, 2021 at 22:11

4 Answers 4

14

Probably the cleanest way to do this is to have TestInitialize start the asynchronous operation, as such:

[TestClass]
public class UnitTestAsync
{
    private Task<int> val = null;

    [TestInitialize]
    public void TestInitializeMethod()
    {
        val = TestInitializeMethodAsync();
    }

    private async Task<int> TestInitializeMethodAsync()
    {
        return await LongRunningMethod();
    }

    private async Task<int> LongRunningMethod()
    {
        await Task.Delay(20);
        return 10;
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public async Task TestMehod2()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(10, await val);
    }
}
3
  • 1
    Don't you feel this is a bit risky? Every test should start by awaiting for that if it relies on the initialisation being complete. Forget one and it'll probably be fine; eventually the test that ran first and awaited on initialisation gets removed, and unrelated tests break. Looks like one of those cases where calling async synchronously is the lesser evil. Jul 22, 2016 at 15:28
  • @romkyns: You can do that if you want. Either way is equally risky - you have a Task<T> and you can't get to the T without awaiting or blocking on it. Sure, you can forget to await (assuming you don't need the T), just like you can forget to block. Personally, I have never used initialization methods in any of my unit tests, ever. If I need to share initialization code, I introduce an actual type in my test project that is used by my individual tests as necessary. Jul 22, 2016 at 15:41
  • This accepted answer is out of date - in latest MSTest version, async TestInitialize methods work fine.
    – Sander
    Aug 7, 2021 at 15:17
11

Your code is correct!

To clarify this answer is 5 years, 2 months after the initial question. Back then having async [TestInitialize] might have been a compile error, but these days it isn't.

It's possible to have async [TestInitialize], async [ClassInitialize] and async [TestMethod] just simply use await.

Using async and await properly is probably the cleanest way to do it. I have something like the following in my code where I need to get our category structure in order to be able to test if the my classes work well with the category structure that we have.

private Category rootCategory;

[TestInitialize]
public async Task TestInitialize()
{
    var loader = new CategoryLoader();
    rootCategory = await loader.GetAllCategoriesAsync();
}

[TestInitialize] runs before every [TestMethod], so depending on what I'm trying to test here, it might be better to load only once and then make all the assertions, to not pay for the loading time multiple times. But you need to be careful so that the tests don't affect each other to get consistent and correct results.

Just a note that this is not a unit test anymore since I'm testing integration with external service.

2
  • MSTest V1: there is no compiler error, but there is a runtime error: Method <full-method-name> has wrong signature. The method must be non-static, public, does not return a value and should not take any parameter.. MSTest V2: works
    – riQQ
    Jun 17, 2020 at 14:07
  • This is incorrect: "... has wrong signature. The method must be non-static, public, does not return a value and should not take any parameter."
    – DanielV
    Mar 3, 2021 at 22:10
9

What you want to do is to use .Result or .Wait() to synchronously block the TestInitialize decorated method. You can do the following:

private int val = 0;

[TestInitialize]
public void TestMehod1()
{
    Task<object> result = LongRunningMethod();
    result.Wait();

    val = 10;
}

[TestMethod]
public void  TestMehod2()
{
    Assert.AreEqual(10, val);
}
1
  • 7
    This won't compile. You can't use the await keyword in a method that isn't declared with the async modifier. The 6th line should be: Task<object> result = LongRunningMethod(); Jul 17, 2017 at 23:56
5

Just create an array of task for various initialization calls ( each return task) and then use Task.WaitAll()

    [ClassInitialize()]
    public static void Initialize(TestContext context)
    {
        List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();
        tasks.Add(InitializeMethod1());
        tasks.Add(InitializeMethod2());
        Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
    }

    public static async Task InitializeMethod1()
    {
    }

    public static async Task InitializeMethod2()
    {
    }

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