2

I use jQuery validation method and I've set some default settings such as below

$.validator.setDefaults({
    errorContainer : "#msgErrors ul",
    errorLabelContainer: "#msgErrors",
    wrapper: "li",
    submitHandler: function(form) {
        lockScreen();
        if (typeof url !== 'undefined' && url != null) {
            loadContentViaAjax("tr#idElement", url, $(form).formSerialize(), "html");
        } else {
            form.submit();
        }
    },
    invalidHandler: function() {
        var divsMessages = $(".fadeOutAndEmpty");
        if (divsMessages.is(":animated")) {
            divsMessages.stop().removeAttr("style").show();
        }
    }
});

For these default settings work, I have to initialize the form by calling the validate method on every form that I have. To achieve this I placed after the page is fully loaded a call to

$("form").validate()

in an external JS file that is loaded by every page. This way all forms in my application will fire the validation method, but I didn't define any rules and calling validate method again passing the actual rules won't do the job.

Is there a way to define rules that has to be executed and those rules actually be executed even if the validate method has already been called?

  • How many forms do you have? If it's a handful, then just call the validate method on each form, with the settings required. – Paddy Dec 4 '13 at 16:11
  • Some of the forms does not have validations to be done at all, that's I placed an empty validate method. What I actually need is the code executed by the submitHandler. I think I'll bind this code in the submit event of each form and then call it in the submit handler. – Philippe Gioseffi Dec 4 '13 at 16:15
  • jquery-validation-engine is a totally different plugin. I fixed your tags. Please be more careful when tagging questions. Thanks. – Sparky Dec 4 '13 at 18:30
4

Quote OP:

"The problem is that for this code to work I have to call the validate method in every form that I have."

That's exactly what you are supposed to do, so I don't understand how or why this is a "problem".

The .validate() method is how you initialize the plugin to work on a particular form. Not much different than how you would initialize any other jQuery plugin to target an element.

You can set the options within .valdiate() for the one targeted form, or you can set the options within .setDefaults() which will apply to all forms on the page.


Quote OP:

"I thought that by calling the method validate in my JSP, I would override the method, but it does not."

Not sure what you mean by "override the method", but .validate() can only be called once on a particular form. Calling it again will do nothing.


Quote OP:

"The problem by doing that is I can't place any validation rules."

Using the jQuery Validate plugin, rules can be declared on your form in many different ways.

Here are just two very simple examples....


Example ONE - inline HTML by class

HTML:

<form id="myform">
    <input type="text" name="field" class="required" />
</form>

jQuery:

$(document).ready(function() {

    // set defaults for all forms on this page
    $.validator.setDefaults({
        // your defaults
    });

    // initialize plugin on form with id #myform
    $('#myform').validate();

});

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/pMp6d/


Example TWO - within .validate()

HTML:

<form id="myform">
    <input type="text" name="field" />
</form>

jQuery:

$(document).ready(function() {

    // set defaults for all forms on this page
    $.validator.setDefaults({
        // your defaults
    });

    // initialize plugin on form with id #myform
    $('#myform').validate({
        rules: {
            field: {
                required: true
            }
        },
        // other options specific to this form
    });

});

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/pMp6d/1/



EDIT:

If you need to declare rules after you've already called .validate(), you would use the .rules('add') method.

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/pMp6d/2/

$('input[name="fieldName"]').rules('add', {
    required: true
});

Alternatively, the same rule assigned to all input elements at once...

$('input').each(function() {
    $(this).rules('add', {
        required: true
    });
});

See this answer for more ways to declare rules: https://stackoverflow.com/a/17792569/594235

  • I'm aware of this two forms on how to validate forms using jquery's validation plugin, but unfortunatelly this does not answer my question. If I have a $("form").validate() I can't later have one specifying rules to override the first one. – Philippe Gioseffi Dec 4 '13 at 18:30
  • @Philippe, your question, "The problem by doing that [$("form").validate()] is I can't place any validation rules." ~ My answer shows that you can. You're going to have to make your question more clear. – Sparky Dec 4 '13 at 18:33
  • If I have a $("form").validate() I can't later have one specifying rules to override the first one such as $("form").validate({// do the magic here}). – Philippe Gioseffi Dec 4 '13 at 18:36
  • @Philippe, no, you cannot override .validate() with another call to .validate(). See my edited answer. – Sparky Dec 4 '13 at 18:38
  • 1
    @Daniel - you cannot dynamically change options. There is no workaround. Please do not ask new questions within comments section. – Sparky Mar 28 '17 at 12:41

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