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I'm building a filtering system for UserProfiles based on known properties but unknown (until runtime) combination of filtering conditions.

In my previous question How do I create a generic Expression that has an expression as a parameter, I've figured out a way to have a FilterDefinition for any value property reachable from User entity via navigation properties (i.e. (User)u=> u.NavigationProperty.AnotherNavigationProperty.SomeValue) and I have a method that can return a predicate as Expression<Func<User,bool>> for a given property, operation ( > < == etc ) and a value.

Now the time has come to filter them on collection properties as well. Say for example User has CheckedOutBooks collection (which is a total fiction, but will do) And I need to create a filter definition for Name property of CheckedOutBooks collection on User object.

What I have: A collection of Users
User class has a collection of Books
now I would like to create a method

Expression<Func<User,bool>> GetPredicate(Expression<User,TProperty>, Operations operation, TProperty value) 

That I can call like GetPredicate(u=>u.Books.Select(b=>b.Name), Operations.Contains, "C# in a nutshell")

and get an expression back similar to

u=>u.Books.Any(b=>b.Name == "C# in a nutshell")

I'm thinking maybe it will be easier to split first parameter in two to achieve this. Maybe u=>u.Books and b=>b.Name will do better?

EDIT: what I got so far:

  class FilterDefinitionForCollectionPropertyValues<T>:FilterDefinition, IUserFilter
    {


    public Expression<Func<UserProfile, IEnumerable<T>>> CollectionSelector { get; set; }
    public Expression<Func<T, string>> CollectionPropertySelector { get; set; }


    public Expression<Func<Profile.UserProfile, bool>> GetFilterPredicateFor(FilterOperations operation, string value)
    {
        var propertyParameter = CollectionPropertySelector.Parameters[0];
        var collectionParameter = CollectionSelector.Parameters[0];

// building predicate to supply to Enumerable.Any() method
        var left = CollectionPropertySelector.Body;
        var right = Expression.Constant(value);    
        var innerLambda = Expression.Equal(left, right);    
        Expression<Func<T, bool>> innerFunction = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(innerLambda, propertyParameter);



        var method = typeof(Enumerable).GetMethods().Where(m => m.Name == "Any" && m.GetParameters().Length == 2).Single().MakeGenericMethod(typeof(T));

        var outerLambda = Expression.Call(method, Expression.Property(collectionParameter, typeof(UserProfile).GetProperty("StaticSegments")), innerFunction);

        throw new NotImplementedException();

    }

    }

Now this one works awesomely and does exactly what's needed, now the only thing I need to figure out is how to replace typeof(UserProfile).GetProperty("StaticSegments")) somehow to use CollectionPropertySelector that is in current example would be (UserProfile)u=>u.StaticSegments

  • Could you perhaps explain a bit the reasons for such a method? I can think of a lot of ways to do this, but I don't know which one would be helpful to you, because you don't say how you want to actually use it. – Luaan Dec 5 '13 at 14:07
  • Why do you even need GetPredicate()? Wouldn't just u => u.Books.Select(b=>b.Name).Contains("C# in a nutshell"), or something similar, work? – svick Dec 5 '13 at 17:08
  • @Luaan I've updated the question to include a little bit of background story. From where I stand now there is no way to use dynamic linq. And defining all possible combinations of possible filtering combinations seems tedious and not DRY (-: – Alexander Taran Dec 6 '13 at 6:19
  • @svick of course it will do ad-hoc, but there will be a UI where user picks and chooses how to shape up the filter. And all a user can be concerned with is a Variable, condition and a value to match against. So there should be a list of variables, possible compare opereations and some hints on what the value could be. – Alexander Taran Dec 6 '13 at 6:22
  • Here's an idea - do you actually need an Expression tree? Wouldn't IQueryable be enough? You can still use it to query the database (or whatever else) and it has tons of handy methods to do what you need and building the queries gets much easier. – Luaan Dec 6 '13 at 6:50
1

You're almost done. Now you just need to do a little trick - wrap your CollectionPropertySelector lambda expression in the CollectionSelector lambda expression.

Expression<Func<TParent,bool>> Wrap<TParent,TElement>(Expression<Func<TParent, IEnumerable<TElement>>> collection, Expression<Func<TElement, bool>> isOne, Expression<Func<IEnumerable<TElement>, Func<TElement, bool>, bool>> isAny)
{
    var parent = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TParent), "parent");

    return 
        (Expression<Func<TParent, bool>>)Expression.Lambda
        (
            Expression.Invoke
            (
                isAny,
                Expression.Invoke
                (
                    collection,
                    parent
                ),
                isOne
            ),
            parent
        );
}

You may have to change this a bit to be used for your particular scenario, but the idea should be clear. My test looked basically like this:

var user = new User { Books = new List<string> { "Book 1", "Book 2" }};

var query = Wrap<User, string>(u => u.Books, b => b.Contains("Bookx"), (collection, condition) => collection.Any(condition));

So you specify the collection selector, predicate and predicate operator, and you're done.

I've written it as a generic method for clarity, but it's dynamic, not strongly typed in essence, so it should be pretty easy to change it to non-generic, if you need that.

  • I' got my solution, will post it on Monday.. thanks for your participation. – Alexander Taran Dec 7 '13 at 19:28
1

Ok I've got it solved for myself. And I published it to gitHub:
https://github.com/Alexander-Taran/Lambda-Magic-Filters

Given the filter definition class (not reafactored to support properties other than string so far, but will do later):

class FilterDefinitionForCollectionPropertyValues<T>:FilterDefinition, IUserFilter
{

//This guy just points to a collection property
public Expression<Func<UserProfile, IEnumerable<T>>> CollectionSelector { get; set; }
// This one points to a property of a member of that collection.
public Expression<Func<T, string>> CollectionPropertySelector { get; set; }


//This one does the heavy work of building a predicate based on a collection,   
//it's member property, operation type and a valaue
public System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<Func<Profile.UserProfile, bool>> GetFilterPredicateFor(FilterOperations operation, string value)
{
    var getExpressionBody = CollectionPropertySelector.Body as MemberExpression;
    if (getExpressionBody == null)
    {
        throw new Exception("getExpressionBody is not MemberExpression: " + CollectionPropertySelector.Body);
    }

    var propertyParameter = CollectionPropertySelector.Parameters[0];
    var collectionParameter = CollectionSelector.Parameters[0];
    var left = CollectionPropertySelector.Body;
    var right = Expression.Constant(value);

    // this is so far hardcoded, but might be changed later based on operation type  
    // as well as a "method" below
    var innerLambda = Expression.Equal(left, right);

    Expression<Func<T, bool>> innerFunction = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(innerLambda, propertyParameter);
    // this is hadrcoded again, but maybe changed later when other type of operation will be needed
    var method = typeof(Enumerable).GetMethods().Where(m => m.Name == "Any" && m.GetParameters().Length == 2).Single().MakeGenericMethod(typeof(T));

    var outerLambda = Expression.Call(method, Expression.Property(collectionParameter, (CollectionSelector.Body as MemberExpression).Member as System.Reflection.PropertyInfo), innerFunction);

    var result = Expression.Lambda<Func<UserProfile, bool>>(outerLambda, collectionParameter);

    return result;

}

}

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