4

I am working on a scientific project which requires several program abilities. After looking around for available tools I decided to work with Boost library which provided me needed features that C++ standard library does not provide such as date/time management, etc.

My project is set of command line which process a bunch of data from a old, homemade, plain-text file-based database: import, conversion, analysis, reporting.

Now I reached the point where I do need persistence. So I included boost::serialization that I found really useful. I am able to store and restore 'medium' dataset (not-so-big but not-so-small), they are about (7000,48,15,10)-dataset.

I also use SQLite C API to store and manage command defaults, output settings and variables meta informations (units, scale, limits).

Something crossed my mind: serialize into blob field instead of separate files. There might be some drawback that I haven't seen yet (there always is) but I think it can be a good solution that will suits my needs.

I am able to text-serialize into a std::string so I can do it that way: there is no difficulties because it only uses normal characters. But I would like to binary-serialize into a blob.

How should I proceed in order to use standard stream when filling my INSERT query?

10

Hah. I've never used sqlite3 C API before. And I've never written an output streambuf implementation. But seeing how I will probably be using sqlite3 in a c++ codebase in the future, I thought I'd spent some time with

So it turns out you can open a blob field for incremental IO. However, though you can read/write the BLOB, you can't change the size (except via a separate UPDATE statement).

So, the steps for my demonstration became:

  1. insert a record into a table, binding a "zero-blob" of a certain (fixed) size
  2. open the blob field in the newly inserted record
  3. wrap the blob handle in a custom blob_buf object that derives from std::basic_streambuf<> and can be used with std::ostream to write to that blob
  4. serialize some data into the ostream
  5. flush
  6. destruct/cleanup

It works :)

The code in main:

int main()
{
    sqlite3 *db = NULL;
    int rc = sqlite3_open_v2("test.sqlite3", &db, SQLITE_OPEN_READWRITE, NULL);
    if (rc != SQLITE_OK) {
        std::cerr << "database open failed: " << sqlite3_errmsg(db) << "\n";
        exit(255);
    }

    // 1. insert a record into a table, binding a "zero-blob" of a certain (fixed) size
    sqlite3_int64 inserted = InsertRecord(db);

    {
        // 2. open the blob field in the newly inserted record
        // 3. wrap the blob handle in a custom `blob_buf` object that derives from `std::basic_streambuf<>` and can be used with `std::ostream` to write to that blob
        blob_buf buf(OpenBlobByRowId(db, inserted));
        std::ostream writer(&buf); // this stream now writes to the blob!

        // 4. serialize some data into the `ostream`
        auto payload = CanBeSerialized { "hello world", { 1, 2, 3.4, 1e7, -42.42 } };

        boost::archive::text_oarchive oa(writer);
        oa << payload;

#if 0   // used for testing with larger data
        std::ifstream ifs("test.cpp");
        writer << ifs.rdbuf();
#endif

        // 5. flush
        writer.flush();

        // 6. destruct/cleanup 
    }

    sqlite3_close(db);
    // ==7653== HEAP SUMMARY:
    // ==7653==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
    // ==7653==   total heap usage: 227 allocs, 227 frees, 123,540 bytes allocated
    // ==7653== 
    // ==7653== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
}

You'll recognize the steps outlined.

To test it, assume you create a new sqlite database:

sqlite3 test.sqlite3 <<< "CREATE TABLE DEMO(ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT, FILE BLOB);"

Now, once you have run the program, you can query for it:

sqlite3 test.sqlite3 <<< "SELECT * FROM DEMO;"
1|22 serialization::archive 10 0 0 11 hello world 5 0 1 2 3.3999999999999999 10000000 -42.420000000000002

If you enable the test code (that puts more data than the blob_size allows) you'll see the blob getting truncated:

contents truncated at 256 bytes

Full Program

#include <sqlite3.h>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <ostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <boost/serialization/vector.hpp>
#include <boost/archive/text_oarchive.hpp>

template<typename CharT, typename TraitsT = std::char_traits<CharT> >
class basic_blob_buf : public std::basic_streambuf<CharT, TraitsT> 
{
    sqlite3_blob* _blob; // owned
    int max_blob_size;

    typedef std::basic_streambuf<CharT, TraitsT> base_type;
    enum { BUFSIZE = 10 }; // Block size - tuning?
    char buf[BUFSIZE+1/*for the overflow character*/];

    size_t cur_offset;
    std::ostream debug;

    // no copying
    basic_blob_buf(basic_blob_buf const&)             = delete;
    basic_blob_buf& operator= (basic_blob_buf const&) = delete;
public:
    basic_blob_buf(sqlite3_blob* blob, int max_size = -1) 
        : _blob(blob), 
        max_blob_size(max_size), 
        buf {0}, 
        cur_offset(0),
        // debug(std::cerr.rdbuf()) // or just use `nullptr` to suppress debug output
        debug(nullptr)
    {
        debug.setf(std::ios::unitbuf);
        if (max_blob_size == -1) {
            max_blob_size = sqlite3_blob_bytes(_blob);
            debug << "max_blob_size detected: " << max_blob_size << "\n";
        }
        this->setp(buf, buf + BUFSIZE);
    }

    int overflow (int c = base_type::traits_type::eof())
    {
        auto putpointer = this->pptr();
        if (c!=base_type::traits_type::eof())
        {
            // add the character - even though pptr might be epptr
            *putpointer++ = c;
        }

        if (cur_offset >= size_t(max_blob_size))
            return base_type::traits_type::eof(); // signal failure

        size_t n = std::distance(this->pbase(), putpointer);
        debug << "Overflow " << n << " bytes at " << cur_offset << "\n";
        if (cur_offset+n > size_t(max_blob_size))
        {
            std::cerr << "contents truncated at " << max_blob_size << " bytes\n";
            n = size_t(max_blob_size) - cur_offset;
        }

        if (SQLITE_OK != sqlite3_blob_write(_blob, this->pbase(), n, cur_offset))
        {
            debug << "sqlite3_blob_write reported an error\n";
            return base_type::traits_type::eof(); // signal failure
        }

        cur_offset += n;

        if (this->pptr() > (this->pbase() + n))
        {
            debug << "pending data has not been written";
            return base_type::traits_type::eof(); // signal failure
        }

        // reset buffer
        this->setp(buf, buf + BUFSIZE);

        return base_type::traits_type::not_eof(c);
    }

    int sync()
    {
        return base_type::traits_type::eof() != overflow();
    }

    ~basic_blob_buf() { 
        sqlite3_blob_close(_blob);
    }
};

typedef basic_blob_buf<char> blob_buf;

struct CanBeSerialized
{
    std::string sometext;
    std::vector<double> a_vector;

    template<class Archive>
    void serialize(Archive & ar, const unsigned int version)
    {
        ar & boost::serialization::make_nvp("sometext", sometext);
        ar & boost::serialization::make_nvp("a_vector", a_vector);
    }
};

#define MAX_BLOB_SIZE 256

sqlite3_int64 InsertRecord(sqlite3* db)
{
    sqlite3_stmt *stmt = NULL;
    int rc = sqlite3_prepare_v2(db, "INSERT INTO DEMO(ID, FILE) VALUES(NULL, ?)", -1, &stmt, NULL);

    if (rc != SQLITE_OK) {
        std::cerr << "prepare failed: " << sqlite3_errmsg(db) << "\n";
        exit(255);
    } else {
        rc = sqlite3_bind_zeroblob(stmt, 1, MAX_BLOB_SIZE);
        if (rc != SQLITE_OK) {
            std::cerr << "bind_zeroblob failed: " << sqlite3_errmsg(db) << "\n";
            exit(255);
        }
        rc = sqlite3_step(stmt);
        if (rc != SQLITE_DONE)
        {
            std::cerr << "execution failed: " << sqlite3_errmsg(db) << "\n";
            exit(255);
        }
    }
    rc = sqlite3_finalize(stmt);
    if (rc != SQLITE_OK)
    {
        std::cerr << "finalize stmt failed: " << sqlite3_errmsg(db) << "\n";
        exit(255);
    }

    return sqlite3_last_insert_rowid(db);
}

sqlite3_blob* OpenBlobByRowId(sqlite3* db, sqlite3_int64 rowid)
{
    sqlite3_blob* pBlob = NULL;
    int rc = sqlite3_blob_open(db, "main", "DEMO", "FILE", rowid, 1/*rw*/, &pBlob);

    if (rc != SQLITE_OK) {
        std::cerr << "blob_open failed: " << sqlite3_errmsg(db) << "\n";
        exit(255);
    }
    return pBlob;
}

int main()
{
    sqlite3 *db = NULL;
    int rc = sqlite3_open_v2("test.sqlite3", &db, SQLITE_OPEN_READWRITE, NULL);
    if (rc != SQLITE_OK) {
        std::cerr << "database open failed: " << sqlite3_errmsg(db) << "\n";
        exit(255);
    }

    // 1. insert a record into a table, binding a "zero-blob" of a certain (fixed) size
    sqlite3_int64 inserted = InsertRecord(db);

    {
        // 2. open the blob field in the newly inserted record
        // 3. wrap the blob handle in a custom `blob_buf` object that derives from `std::basic_streambuf<>` and can be used with `std::ostream` to write to that blob
        blob_buf buf(OpenBlobByRowId(db, inserted));
        std::ostream writer(&buf); // this stream now writes to the blob!

        // 4. serialize some data into the `ostream`
        auto payload = CanBeSerialized { "hello world", { 1, 2, 3.4, 1e7, -42.42 } };

        boost::archive::text_oarchive oa(writer);
        oa << payload;

#if 0   // used for testing with larger data
        std::ifstream ifs("test.cpp");
        writer << ifs.rdbuf();
#endif

        // 5. flush
        writer.flush();

        // 6. destruct/cleanup 
    }

    sqlite3_close(db);
}

PS. I've kept error handling... very crude. You'll want to introduce a helper function to check sqlite3 errorcodes and translate into exception(s) maybe. :)

  • Your reply just underlines everything I missed: (i) There is no way to build a classic query string including raw binary data (how should I missed it, it is obvious), (ii) blob has predefined size (STL container makes you forget that you have to care about the place your data actually takes), (iii) there is dedicated function in SQlite C++ API to interact with blob field (had no idea where to begin, that is closely related to (i)). I read your references and I will implement it this weekend. Your answer helps me a lot, thank you for replying to my first Stack Overflow post. – jlandercy Dec 6 '13 at 21:19
  • 1
    I did testes this morning, it works like a charm, it works out-of-the-box. Thank you again, I will start to implement it right now to my interface. – jlandercy Dec 7 '13 at 9:33

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