7

I have two classes with exactly same members (properties and fields) with same datatypes. I want to map the members from one to other in automated way. I know there are more practical means development-wise to handle. One simple solution is to manually map each member from one instance to other. But, I want to automate this as some general solution.

Assuming you have the following code:

public MyObject1 AssignTest (MyObject1 obj1, MyObject2 obj2)
{
    //Code here for auto map
}

Where MyObject1 and MyObject2 have the exact same properties with same datatype. I do not want to go through and assign the values individually (i.e. MyObject1.Property1 = MyObject2.Property1 etc.). Is it possible to assign all the values that have been specified in MyObject1 to MyObject2 automatically?

  • 1
    Yes, read up on reflection. – Kirk Woll Dec 5 '13 at 20:42
  • 1
    This would be really good to know when converting EntityFramework objects to their proper Models. – Corey Ogburn Dec 5 '13 at 20:42
  • 2
    This is what things like AutoMapper does. Mapping properties from one object to another. One/2 lines of code and its done. – Ahmed ilyas Dec 5 '13 at 20:44
  • @CoreyOgburn: EF provides libraries for reading metadata. A direct mapper would not do because of navigation properties/collections (unless you just pull the model columns I suppose). – Ed S. Dec 5 '13 at 20:46
6

One possibility to make this (for example for the purpose of creating your own automapper or understand how it basically works) would be to use (as already suggested) Reflection. The code can look like this:

// TODO: error handling
// Test classes
public class A
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Count;
}

public class B
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Count;
}
// copy routine
public B CopyAToB(A a)
{
    B b = new B();
    // copy fields
    var typeOfA = a.GetType();
    var typeOfB = b.GetType();
    foreach (var fieldOfA in typeOfA.GetFields())
    {
        var fieldOfB = typeOfB.GetField(fieldOfA.Name);
        fieldOfB.SetValue(b, fieldOfA.GetValue(a));
    }
    // copy properties
    foreach (var propertyOfA in typeOfA.GetProperties())
    {
        var propertyOfB = typeOfB.GetProperty(propertyOfA.Name);
        propertyOfB.SetValue(b, propertyOfA.GetValue(a));
    }

    return b;
}

The function can be used like this:

var a = new A
{
    Name = "a",
    Count = 1
};

var b = CopyAToB(a);
Console.Out.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} - {1}", b.Name, b.Count));

The output is:

a - 1

Please note, that the usage of reflection comes with a price - it costs performance. Using reflection you can access both private and public object members. This is for example used from Visual Studio to create test accessor objects in order to access all test object members.

Please have a look at the existing automappers (see the other answers for links) and use them instead of reinventing the wheel by yourself - the existing libraries are optimized for speed, thoroughly tested and are very comfortable to use. This way you will minimize errors in your code.

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  • 1
    This is really interesting code - but for future users who are looking at this, auto mapping is a bit more than what is listed here. As an example, auto mapping will map strings into enumeration values or other sorts of complicated mapping. One sample where this comes in handy is to map web requests (JSON as an example) to C# objects that represent those requests. Clearly web requests are strings while the request objects can be defined however the user wants. If anyone is interested in learning I would still highly recommend reading up on auto mappers! – drew_w Dec 5 '13 at 21:11
  • @drew_w This is very simple example to show the basics of reflection. It is in any case not an advanced automapper. I think the OP wanted to see if it is possible and how it can be done (and i assume looking at the question tag, not for a web project but generally). Otherwise i also prefer to use ServiceStack automapper instead of reinventing the (slow) wheel. :-) – pasty Dec 5 '13 at 21:17
  • @pasty I absolutely understand. Just wanted to make sure some novice didn't go here and copy/paste thinking they had done a good job at creating an auto mapper : ) – drew_w Dec 5 '13 at 21:19
  • @drew_w I agree. The answer was edited. I wrote the answer using reflection because i think use an automapper is not a proper answer for how can it be done / how does it work. – pasty Dec 5 '13 at 21:27
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    Thanks @pasty that helped me. To make this even more generalized, I have created a generic implementation of the same. I have added it as an answer and mentioned your name. – Amit Joshi Aug 20 '19 at 15:36
7

Mapping libraries such as ValueInjector or AutoMapper are a great help for exactly this sort of functionality.

Using AutoMapper you would create a mapping using something like this

Mapper.CreateMap<MyObject1,MyObject2>();

It has a number of default conventions, one of which is that by default it will copy properties with identical types/names.

And then actually do a mapping like this

var myObject2 = Mapper.Map<MyObject1,MyObject2>(myObject1);

Of course you can do this easy enough with reflection as well, but with libraries such as these someone has put a lot of thought into adding all sorts of handy mapping functionality, as well as done performance tuning. AutoMapper, for example, uses IL generation to read values instead of reflection so it is significantly faster for repeatedly mapping things (very hand for mapping big collections of things)

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1

There are a number of tools that do this. Look at the "TranslateTo" routine in service stack as an example. They have excellent auto mapping (https://github.com/ServiceStack/ServiceStack/wiki/Auto-mapping).

Using this, all you would have to do is:

 obj2 = obj1.TranslateTo<MyObject2>();

Simple and elegant!

In case you are interested a few other references to similar topics:

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  • Note: was renamed to obj1.ConvertTo<MyObject2>() in ServiceStack v4. – mythz Dec 5 '13 at 21:07
1

Extending from accepted answer from @pasty, I have created generic method for this purpose.

public static TDest MapSourceToDest<TSource, TDest>(TSource source)
                                    where TSource : class//We are not creating an instance of source, no need to restrict parameterless constructor
                                    where TDest : class, new()//We are creating an instance of destination, parameterless constructor is needed
{
    if(source == null)
        return null;

    TDest destination = new TDest();

    var typeOfSource = source.GetType();
    var typeOfDestination = destination.GetType();

    foreach(var fieldOfSource in typeOfSource.GetFields())
    {
        var fieldOfDestination = typeOfDestination.GetField(fieldOfSource.Name);
        if(fieldOfDestination != null)
        {
            try
            { fieldOfDestination.SetValue(destination, fieldOfSource.GetValue(source)); }
            catch(ArgumentException) { }//If datatype is mismatch, skip the mapping
        }
    }

    foreach(var propertyOfSource in typeOfSource.GetProperties())
    {
        var propertyOfDestination = typeOfDestination.GetProperty(propertyOfSource.Name);
        if(propertyOfDestination != null)
        {
            try
            { propertyOfDestination.SetValue(destination, propertyOfSource.GetValue(source)); }
            catch(ArgumentException) { }//If datatype is mismatch, skip the mapping
        }
    }

    return destination;
}

One may need to alter the filters on generic types; but everything else will work cross any types. Null check is added for fieldOfDestination and propertyOfDestination just in case a member is missing; this adds up little more flexibility.

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0

AutoMapper is another good tool for something like this http://automapper.codeplex.com/

You map from one object to another with something like this:

Mapper.CreateMap<MyClass, MyDTO>();
var myDTO = Mapper.Map<MyClass, MyDTO>(myClass);
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