9

I don't understand why in Firefox, window.history.back() does work on a button:

<button onclick="window.history.back()">Go back</button>

But it does not work for a link:

<a onclick="window.history.back()">Go back</a>

What is the difference?

An example illustrating this:

index.html

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
  <h1>First page</h1>
  <br/>
  <a href="second.html">Second</a>
</body>
</html>

second.html

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
  <h1>Second page</h1>
  <a href="third.html">Third</a>
  <br/>
  <br/>
  <button onclick="window.history.back()">Go Back (button)</button>
  <br/>
  <a href="javascript: void(0);" onclick="window.history.back()">Go Back (a)</a>
</body>
</html>

third.html

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
  <h1>Third page</h1>
  <br/>
  <button onclick="window.history.back()">Go Back (button)</button>
  <br/>
  <a href="javascript: void(0);" onclick="window.history.back()">Go Back (a)</a>
</body>
</html>

Scenario:

  1. Run index.html and click Second.
  2. On second.html click Third.
  3. On third.html click Go back (a).
  4. On second.html click Go back (a). Boom! I'm on the third.html, and not on the first.html!!!

Plunker example (Note! Run it on Firefox)

If you use Go back (button) it works. What is the difference in <a onclick and <button onclick in this case?

5
  • 1
    Instead of onclick="window.history.back()" why don't you consider using href="javascript:window.history.back()"? Dec 6, 2013 at 9:49
  • But I did not ask about the bypass. And I ask why it works that way?
    – lukpaw
    Dec 6, 2013 at 9:54
  • see the link developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Guide/API/DOM/…
    – Anand Jha
    Dec 6, 2013 at 10:03
  • it seems to working fine in Firefox 25.0.1
    – user2587132
    Dec 6, 2013 at 10:08
  • I have just tested it on Firefox 25.0.1 and it doesn't work.
    – lukpaw
    Dec 6, 2013 at 14:24

4 Answers 4

16

You are facing this issue (quoted from vikku.info):

But what had happened when i press the back button after navigating to various pages was i got locked between the last two navigated pages.

Someone in the comments hit the nail on this issue.

  • When you create the onclick attribute, you are attaching an additional event handler for clicking a link. However, the browser will still handle some native logic, so it will still add the current page to the history;
  • When you pass in specific javascript into the href attribute, you are actually overriding the native logic of the browser, so it won't add the current page to the history;

SIMPLE, DIRTY SOLUTION

HTML:

<a href="javascript:window.history.back();">Back</a>

IMPROVED SOLUTION

I've also created an example (Plunker example) that makes use of the native preventDefault functionality (MDN on preventDefault). In that case, it is not needed to write javascript in the href attribute. Now, you can support users that are not using javascript by linking to, for example, the homepage. You better also avoid using inline event handlers.

HTML:

<a href="index.html" id="backButton">Back</a>

Javascript:

var backbutton = document.getElementById("backButton");
backbutton.onclick = function(e){
  e = e || window.event; // support  for IE8 and lower
  e.preventDefault(); // stop browser from doing native logic
  window.history.back();
}
1

I think it may be related to the href attribute of the a tag, that get interpreted as a next step in navigation (even if you go back in history).

Try removing the href attribute from the a.

As you see, this way it works:

Demo

You do need just to fix CSS for the a now

1

Try this:

$("#back").click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    history.back(1);
})

or

<a href="javascript:void(0);" onclick="window.history.go(-1); return false;"> Link </a>
0

Try with

window.history.go(-1)

Check the link for more details.

4
  • Could you explain what difference it will make?
    – Pavlo
    Dec 6, 2013 at 9:51
  • would let it to go just one step back(just previous visited page.)
    – Anand Jha
    Dec 6, 2013 at 9:53
  • Your answer does not work! But I did not ask about the bypass. And I ask why it works that way. Workaround is <a href = "javascript: window.history.back ()".
    – lukpaw
    Dec 6, 2013 at 9:54
  • Isn't that what window.history.back() does?
    – Pavlo
    Dec 6, 2013 at 9:54

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