53

I'd like to see all the places in my code (C++) which disregard return value of a function. How can I do it - with gcc or static code analysis tool?

Bad code example:

int f(int z) {
    return z + (z*2) + z/3 + z*z + 23;
}


int main()
{
  int i = 7;
  f(i); ///// <<----- here I disregard the return value

  return 1;
}

Please note that:

  • it should work even if the function and its use are in different files
  • free static check tool
  • 3
    This will print a lot of warnings if you use printf for example. – Alok Singhal Jan 11 '10 at 15:49
  • 1
    The "probable" reason it cannot be enforced via the command line is that if you have a valid reason to disregard a result, then you would end up with the need to allocate an "unused variable" which would generate a warning. For example, you certainly don't want T& operator=(T rhs); to force you to catch the result ;) – Matthieu M. Jan 11 '10 at 20:11
  • 5
    @Matthieu M: You don't need to allocate a dummy variable when you want to ignore the return value of a function. Simply cast the function call to void, as in (void) function_returning_a_val();. When reading the code, this also makes it clearer that you are intentionally ignoring the return value. – bta Jan 15 '10 at 0:01
  • 4
    [[nodiscard]] in C++17. – Marc Glisse Oct 28 '16 at 16:57
  • 1
    Since this looks like the oldest and most upvoted question on this topic I added an update answer covering C++17. – Shafik Yaghmour Jul 22 '18 at 15:49
54

You want GCC's warn_unused_result attribute:

#define WARN_UNUSED __attribute__((warn_unused_result))

int WARN_UNUSED f(int z) {
    return z + (z*2) + z/3 + z*z + 23;
}

int main()
{
  int i = 7;
  f(i); ///// <<----- here i disregard the return value
  return 1;
}

Trying to compile this code produces:

$ gcc test.c
test.c: In function `main':
test.c:16: warning: ignoring return value of `f', declared with
attribute warn_unused_result

You can see this in use in the Linux kernel; they have a __must_check macro that does the same thing; looks like you need GCC 3.4 or greater for this to work. Then you will find that macro used in kernel header files:

unsigned long __must_check copy_to_user(void __user *to,
                                        const void *from, unsigned long n);
  • i'm removing the answer acceptance, unfortunately it works in single file only. – Drakosha Jan 12 '10 at 13:20
  • 2
    Works fine in a header file for me. I put a function prototype with WARN_UNUSED in a new file lib.h and then included that from test.c and got the same warning. Also note this is how the Linux kernel does it. – Eric Seppanen Jan 12 '10 at 15:45
  • 1
    sorry, i don't have time to recheck it, accepting the answer. – Drakosha Jan 17 '10 at 12:33
  • 1
    I can assure you from experience that it does work across multiple files – Mawg Feb 14 '18 at 10:45
10

As far as I'm aware there is no GCC option to give this warning. However, if you are interested in specific functions, you can tag them with an attribute:

int fn() __attribute__((warn_unused_result));

which would give a warning if the return value of fn() was not used. Caveat: I've never used this feature myself.

10

You can use this handy template to do it at run-time.

Instead of returning an error code (e.g. HRESULT) you return a return_code<HRESULT>, which asserts if it goes out of scope without the value being read. It's not a static analysis tool, but it's useful none the less.

class return_value
{
public:
  explicit return_value(T value)
    :value(value), checked(false)
  {
  }

  return_value(const return_value& other)
    :value(other.value), checked(other.checked)
  {
    other.checked = true;
  }

  return_value& operator=(const return_value& other)
  {
    if( this != &other ) 
    {
      assert(checked);
      value = other.value;
      checked = other.checked;
      other.checked = true;
    }
  }

  ~return_value(const return_value& other)
  {
    assert(checked);
  }

  T get_value()const {
    checked = true;
    return value;
  }

private:
  mutable bool checked;
  T value;
};
  • 2
    It's a nice idea. Unfortunately it violates the "destructors mustn't throw" principle: parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/exceptions.html#faq-17.3, but maybe that'd be acceptable for a "check all returns" testing mode (there's probably no need for the check in a final release build). – timday Jan 11 '10 at 23:01
  • I've seen implementations that use the most significant bit of the error code instead of the bool. – Alex Oct 10 '14 at 15:55
9

For C++17 the answer to this question changes since we now have the [[nodiscard]] attribute. Covered in [dcl.attr.nodiscard]:

The attribute-token nodiscard may be applied to the declarator-id in a function declaration or to the declaration of a class or enumeration. It shall appear at most once in each attribute-list and no attribute-argument-clause shall be present.

and

[ Example:

struct [[nodiscard]] error_info { /* ... */ };
error_info enable_missile_safety_mode();
void launch_missiles();
void test_missiles() {
  enable_missile_safety_mode(); // warning encouraged
  launch_missiles();
}
error_info &foo();
void f() { foo(); }             // warning not encouraged: not a nodiscard call, because neither
                                // the (reference) return type nor the function is declared nodiscard

 — end example ]

So modifying your example (see it live):

[[nodiscard]] int f(int z) {
    return z + (z*2) + z/3 + z*z + 23;
}


int main()
{
  int i = 7;
  f(i); // now we obtain a diagnostic

  return 1;
}

We now obtain a diagnostic with both gcc and clang e.g.

warning: ignoring return value of function declared with 'nodiscard' attribute [-Wunused-result]
  f(i); // now we obtain a diagnostic
  ^ ~
4

Any static analysis code (e.g. PC-Lint) should be able to tell you that. For PC-Lint, I know that this is the case.

4

a static analyzer will do the work for you, but if your code base is more then trivial prepare to be overwhelmed ;-)

4

A static analyzer will be your best bet here. We use Coverity here, but there are free tools available that you can use as well.

If you need a quick-and-dirty solution and you have a Linux-style shell handy, you can try something like:

grep -rn "function_name" * | grep -v "="

That will find every line that references the specified function but does not contain an "=". You can get a lot of false positives (and potentially some false negatives) but if you don't have a static analyzer it's a decent place to start.

2

The classic 'lint' program used to be very voluble about functions that returned a value that was ignored. The trouble was, many of those warnings were unwanted - leading to excessive noise in the lint output (it was picking up bits of fluff that you wanted it to ignore). That's probably why GCC doesn't have a standard warning for it.

The other issue - the flip side - is "how do you suppress the warning when you know you are ignoring the result but really don't care". The classic scenario for that is:

if (signal(SIGHUP, SIG_IGN) != SIG_IGN)
    signal(SIGHUP, sighandler);

You care about the first result from signal(); you know that the second will be SIG_IGN (since you just set it to that). To get away from the warnings, I sometimes use some variant on:

if ((old = signal(SIGHUP, SIG_IGN)) != SIG_IGN)
    old = signal(SIGHUP, sighandler);

This assigns to old both times. You can follow that with 'assert(old == SIG_IGN)'.

  • 7
    Actually, the typical way of saying "no, I really don't care about the return value" is with a cast to void, e.g. (void)printf("Hello, world!\n"); Even at the highest warning level, no warning will be emitted for this with the explicit cast to void. – Adam Rosenfield Jan 11 '10 at 16:52
  • Yes, the '(void)' cast works...it looks ugly in the code, though. And I've got to look after code which replaces that ugly-gram with 'VOID' instead; it maps to '(void)' cast with Standard C compilers (all C compilers these days), but originated in the days before they were standard and then did things with assigning the result to a file static variable ('#define VOID _void_ =' or thereabouts). Aaah; the memories, and the hoops that had to be jumped through. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 11 '10 at 23:25

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