841

I'll use a concrete, but hypothetical, example.

Each Order normally has only one line item:

Orders:

OrderGUID   OrderNumber
=========   ============
{FFB2...}   STL-7442-1      
{3EC6...}   MPT-9931-8A

LineItems:

LineItemGUID   Order ID Quantity   Description
============   ======== ========   =================================
{098FBE3...}   1        7          prefabulated amulite
{1609B09...}   2        32         spurving bearing

But occasionally there will be an order with two line items:

LineItemID   Order ID    Quantity   Description
==========   ========    ========   =================================
{A58A1...}   6,784,329   5          pentametric fan
{0E9BC...}   6,784,329   5          differential girdlespring 

Normally when showing the orders to the user:

SELECT Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description
FROM Orders
    INNER JOIN LineItems 
    ON Orders.OrderID = LineItems.OrderID

I want to show the single item on the order. But with this occasional order containing two (or more) items, the orders would appear be duplicated:

OrderNumber   Quantity   Description
===========   ========   ====================
STL-7442-1    7          prefabulated amulite
MPT-9931-8A   32         spurving bearing
KSG-0619-81   5          panametric fan
KSG-0619-81   5          differential girdlespring

What I really want is to have SQL Server just pick one, as it will be good enough:

OrderNumber   Quantity   Description
===========   ========   ====================
STL-7442-1    7          prefabulated amulite
MPT-9931-8A   32         differential girdlespring
KSG-0619-81   5          panametric fan

If I get adventurous, I might show the user, an ellipsis to indicate that there's more than one:

OrderNumber   Quantity   Description
===========   ========   ====================
STL-7442-1    7          prefabulated amulite
MPT-9931-8A   32         differential girdlespring
KSG-0619-81   5          panametric fan, ...

So the question is how to either

  • eliminate "duplicate" rows
  • only join to one of the rows, to avoid duplication

First attempt

My first naive attempt was to only join to the "TOP 1" line items:

SELECT Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description
FROM Orders
    INNER JOIN (
       SELECT TOP 1 LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description
       FROM LineItems
       WHERE LineItems.OrderID = Orders.OrderID) LineItems2
    ON 1=1

But that gives the error:

The column or prefix 'Orders' does not
match with a table name or alias name
used in the query.

Presumably because the inner select doesn't see the outer table.

2
  • 3
    Can't you use group by? Apr 11 '17 at 7:54
  • 2
    I think (and correct me if I'm wrong) group by would require listing all the other columns, excluding the one where you don't want duplicates. Source Jun 1 '18 at 12:25

11 Answers 11

1344
+50
SELECT   Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description
FROM     Orders
JOIN     LineItems
ON       LineItems.LineItemGUID =
         (
         SELECT  TOP 1 LineItemGUID 
         FROM    LineItems
         WHERE   OrderID = Orders.OrderID
         )

In SQL Server 2005 and above, you could just replace INNER JOIN with CROSS APPLY:

SELECT  Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems2.Quantity, LineItems2.Description
FROM    Orders
CROSS APPLY
        (
        SELECT  TOP 1 LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description
        FROM    LineItems
        WHERE   LineItems.OrderID = Orders.OrderID
        ) LineItems2

Please note that TOP 1 without ORDER BY is not deterministic: this query you will get you one line item per order, but it is not defined which one will it be.

Multiple invocations of the query can give you different line items for the same order, even if the underlying did not change.

If you want deterministic order, you should add an ORDER BY clause to the innermost query.

Example sqlfiddle

21
  • 3
    Excellent, that works; moving TOP 1 from derived table clause to join clause.
    – Ian Boyd
    Jan 11 '10 at 16:54
  • 121
    and the "OUTER JOIN" equivalent would be "OUTER APPLY" Dec 22 '11 at 10:41
  • 9
    How about for LEFT OUTER JOIN? Jan 31 '12 at 23:11
  • 8
    How do you do this if the join is via a compound key/has multiple columns?
    – Brett Ryan
    Sep 12 '12 at 7:20
  • 10
    CROSS APPLY instead INNER JOIN and OUTER APPLY instead LEFT JOIN (the same as LEFT OUTER JOIN).
    – hastrb
    Mar 15 '18 at 12:04
133

I know this question was answered a while ago, but when dealing with large data sets, nested queries can be costly. Here is a different solution where the nested query will only be ran once, instead of for each row returned.

SELECT 
  Orders.OrderNumber,
  LineItems.Quantity, 
  LineItems.Description
FROM 
  Orders
  INNER JOIN (
    SELECT
      Orders.OrderNumber,
      Max(LineItem.LineItemID) AS LineItemID
    FROM
      Orders INNER JOIN LineItems
      ON Orders.OrderNumber = LineItems.OrderNumber
    GROUP BY Orders.OrderNumber
  ) AS Items ON Orders.OrderNumber = Items.OrderNumber
  INNER JOIN LineItems 
  ON Items.LineItemID = LineItems.LineItemID
6
  • 3
    This is also much faster if your 'LineItemId' column is not indexed properly. Compared to the accepted answer.
    – GER
    Jan 20 '15 at 16:43
  • 5
    But how would you do this if Max is not usable as you need to order by a column different to the one you want to return?
    – NickG
    Apr 24 '15 at 16:04
  • 2
    you can order the derived table whichever way you want and use TOP 1 in SQL Server or LIMIT 1 in MySQL
    – stifin
    Jun 9 '15 at 10:39
  • 1
    Found this to be much faster on larger data sets Jan 11 at 16:27
  • 1
    Could you please elaborate? As far as only syntax is concerned, your answer is as nested as Quassnoi's: exactly one subquery. You cannot just imply that one will run "for each row returned" and the other will not just because the syntax seems so. You have to include a plan. Jan 21 at 18:15
38

@Quassnoi answer is good, in some cases (especially if the outer table is big), a more efficient query might be with using windowed functions, like this:

SELECT  Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems2.Quantity, LineItems2.Description
FROM    Orders
LEFT JOIN 
        (
        SELECT  LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description, OrderId, ROW_NUMBER()
                OVER (PARTITION BY OrderId ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) AS RowNum
        FROM    LineItems

        ) LineItems2 ON LineItems2.OrderId = Orders.OrderID And RowNum = 1

Sometimes you just need to test which query gives better performance.

4
  • 3
    This is the only answer I found that does a real "Left" join, meaning it does not add any more lines then is in the "Left" table. You just need to put in subquery and add "where RowNum is not null"
    – user890332
    May 10 '19 at 17:55
  • 1
    Agreed this is the best solution. This solution also does not require you to have a unique ID in the table you're joining to, and is much faster than the top voted answer. You can also add criteria for which row you prefer to return, rather than just taking a random row, by using an ORDER BY clause in the subquery. Oct 3 '19 at 14:06
  • This is a good solution. Please note: when using for your own situation, be very careful how you PARTION BY (usually you do probably want some ID column there) and ORDER BY (which could be done by most anything, depending on which row you want to keep, e.g. DateCreated desc would be one choice for some tables, but it would depend on a lot of things) Mar 23 '20 at 20:30
  • What does imply the (SELECT NULL) in the OVER clause?
    – Simone
    Sep 8 at 9:30
28

You could do:

SELECT 
  Orders.OrderNumber, 
  LineItems.Quantity, 
  LineItems.Description
FROM 
  Orders INNER JOIN LineItems 
  ON Orders.OrderID = LineItems.OrderID
WHERE
  LineItems.LineItemID = (
    SELECT MIN(LineItemID) 
    FROM   LineItems
    WHERE  OrderID = Orders.OrderID
  )

This requires an index (or primary key) on LineItems.LineItemID and an index on LineItems.OrderID or it will be slow.

4
  • 2
    This does not work if an Orders has no LineItems. The sub-expression then evaluates LineItems.LineItemID = null and removes the left entity orders completely from the result.
    – leo
    Jul 2 '15 at 9:53
  • 8
    That's also the effect of the inner join, so... yeah.
    – Tomalak
    Jul 2 '15 at 9:58
  • 1
    Solution that can be adapted for LEFT OUTER JOIN: stackoverflow.com/a/20576200/510583
    – leo
    Jul 2 '15 at 10:38
  • 4
    @leo Yes, but the OP used an inner join himself, so I don't understand your objection.
    – Tomalak
    Jul 2 '15 at 10:56
20

From SQL Server 2012 and onwards I think this will do the trick:

SELECT DISTINCT
    o.OrderNumber ,
    FIRST_VALUE(li.Quantity) OVER ( PARTITION BY o.OrderNumber ORDER BY li.Description ) AS Quantity ,
    FIRST_VALUE(li.Description) OVER ( PARTITION BY o.OrderNumber ORDER BY li.Description ) AS Description
FROM    Orders AS o
    INNER JOIN LineItems AS li ON o.OrderID = li.OrderID
2
  • 4
    Best answer if you ask me.
    – thomas
    Nov 28 '19 at 23:45
  • I think this is the best answer
    – Hoang Tran
    Feb 23 at 7:51
15

,Another aproach using common table expression:

with firstOnly as (
    select Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description, ROW_NUMBER() over (partiton by Orders.OrderID order by Orders.OrderID) lp
    FROM Orders
        join LineItems on Orders.OrderID = LineItems.OrderID
) select *
  from firstOnly
  where lp = 1

or, in the end maybe you would like to show all rows joined?

comma separated version here:

  select *
  from Orders o
    cross apply (
        select CAST((select l.Description + ','
        from LineItems l
        where l.OrderID = s.OrderID
        for xml path('')) as nvarchar(max)) l
    ) lines
11

Correlated sub queries are sub queries that depend on the outer query. It’s like a for loop in SQL. The sub-query will run once for each row in the outer query:

select * from users join widgets on widgets.id = (
    select id from widgets
    where widgets.user_id = users.id
    order by created_at desc
    limit 1
)
4

EDIT: nevermind, Quassnoi has a better answer.

For SQL2K, something like this:

SELECT 
  Orders.OrderNumber
, LineItems.Quantity
, LineItems.Description
FROM (  
  SELECT 
    Orders.OrderID
  , Orders.OrderNumber
  , FirstLineItemID = (
      SELECT TOP 1 LineItemID
      FROM LineItems
      WHERE LineItems.OrderID = Orders.OrderID
      ORDER BY LineItemID -- or whatever else
      )
  FROM Orders
  ) Orders
JOIN LineItems 
  ON LineItems.OrderID = Orders.OrderID 
 AND LineItems.LineItemID = Orders.FirstLineItemID
4

My favorite way to run this query is with a not exists clause. I believe this is the most efficient way to run this sort of query:

select o.OrderNumber,
       li.Quantity,
       li.Description
from Orders as o
inner join LineItems as li
on li.OrderID = o.OrderID
where not exists (
    select 1
    from LineItems as li_later
    where li_later.OrderID = o.OrderID
    and li_later.LineItemGUID > li.LineItemGUID
    )

But I have not tested this method against other methods suggested here.

3

Tried the cross, works nicely, but takes slightly longer. Adjusted line columns to have max and added group which kept speed and dropped the extra record.

Here's the adjusted query:

SELECT Orders.OrderNumber, max(LineItems.Quantity), max(LineItems.Description)
FROM Orders
    INNER JOIN LineItems 
    ON Orders.OrderID = LineItems.OrderID
Group by Orders.OrderNumber
1
  • 13
    But having max separately on two columns means the quantity might not be related to the description. If the order was 2 Widgets and 10 Gadgets, the query would return 10 Widgets.
    – Brianorca
    Aug 4 '15 at 23:52
2

try this

SELECT
   Orders.OrderNumber,
   LineItems.Quantity, 
   LineItems.Description
FROM Orders
   INNER JOIN (
      SELECT
         Orders.OrderNumber,
         Max(LineItem.LineItemID) AS LineItemID
       FROM Orders 
          INNER JOIN LineItems
          ON Orders.OrderNumber = LineItems.OrderNumber
       GROUP BY Orders.OrderNumber
   ) AS Items ON Orders.OrderNumber = Items.OrderNumber
   INNER JOIN LineItems 
   ON Items.LineItemID = LineItems.LineItemID
1
  • 4
    Please consider explaining what your query does to solve the OP's problem Feb 19 '20 at 6:01

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