I'll use a concrete, but hypothetical, example.

Each Order normally has only one line item:

Orders:

OrderGUID   OrderNumber
=========   ============
{FFB2...}   STL-7442-1      
{3EC6...}   MPT-9931-8A

LineItems:

LineItemGUID   Order ID Quantity   Description
============   ======== ========   =================================
{098FBE3...}   1        7          prefabulated amulite
{1609B09...}   2        32         spurving bearing

But occasionally there will be an order with two line items:

LineItemID   Order ID    Quantity   Description
==========   ========    ========   =================================
{A58A1...}   6,784,329   5          pentametric fan
{0E9BC...}   6,784,329   5          differential girdlespring 

Normally when showing the orders to the user:

SELECT Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description
FROM Orders
    INNER JOIN LineItems 
    ON Orders.OrderID = LineItems.OrderID

I want to show the single item on the order. But with this occasional order containing two (or more) items, the orders would appear be duplicated:

OrderNumber   Quantity   Description
===========   ========   ====================
STL-7442-1    7          prefabulated amulite
MPT-9931-8A   32         spurving bearing
KSG-0619-81   5          panametric fan
KSG-0619-81   5          differential girdlespring

What I really want is to have SQL Server just pick one, as it will be good enough:

OrderNumber   Quantity   Description
===========   ========   ====================
STL-7442-1    7          prefabulated amulite
MPT-9931-8A   32         differential girdlespring
KSG-0619-81   5          panametric fan

If I get adventurous, I might show the user, an ellipsis to indicate that there's more than one:

OrderNumber   Quantity   Description
===========   ========   ====================
STL-7442-1    7          prefabulated amulite
MPT-9931-8A   32         differential girdlespring
KSG-0619-81   5          panametric fan, ...

So the question is how to either

  • eliminate "duplicate" rows
  • only join to one of the rows, to avoid duplication

First attempt

My first naive attempt was to only join to the "TOP 1" line items:

SELECT Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description
FROM Orders
    INNER JOIN (
       SELECT TOP 1 LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description
       FROM LineItems
       WHERE LineItems.OrderID = Orders.OrderID) LineItems2
    ON 1=1

But that gives the error:

The column or prefix 'Orders' does not match with a table name or alias name used in the query.

Presumably because the inner select doesn't see the outer table.

  • 1
    Can't you use group by? – Dariush Jafari Apr 11 '17 at 7:54
  • I think (and correct me if I'm wrong) group by would require listing all the other columns, excluding the one where you don't want duplicates. Source – Joshua Nelson Jun 1 at 12:25

10 Answers 10

up vote 976 down vote accepted
+50
SELECT   Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description
FROM     Orders
JOIN     LineItems
ON       LineItems.LineItemGUID =
         (
         SELECT  TOP 1 LineItemGUID 
         FROM    LineItems
         WHERE   OrderID = Orders.OrderID
         )

In SQL Server 2005 and above, you could just replace INNER JOIN with CROSS APPLY:

SELECT  Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems2.Quantity, LineItems2.Description
FROM    Orders
CROSS APPLY
        (
        SELECT  TOP 1 LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description
        FROM    LineItems
        WHERE   LineItems.OrderID = Orders.OrderID
        ) LineItems2

Please note that TOP 1 without ORDER BY is not deterministic: this query you will get you one line item per order, but it is not defined which one will it be.

Multiple invocations of the query can give you different line items for the same order, even if the underlying did not change.

If you want deterministic order, you should add an ORDER BY clause to the innermost query.

  • 2
    Excellent, that works; moving TOP 1 from derived table clause to join clause. – Ian Boyd Jan 11 '10 at 16:54
  • 87
    and the "OUTER JOIN" equivalent would be "OUTER APPLY" – Alex Dec 22 '11 at 10:41
  • 7
    How about for LEFT OUTER JOIN? – Alex Nolasco Jan 31 '12 at 23:11
  • 7
    How do you do this if the join is via a compound key/has multiple columns? – Brett Ryan Sep 12 '12 at 7:20
  • 2
    @JeffDavis: it will save you one seek per row if OrderId is the leading column in the primary key. – Quassnoi Sep 17 '15 at 14:31

I know this question was answered a while ago, but when dealing with large data sets, nested queries can be costly. Here is a different solution where the nested query will only be ran once, instead of for each row returned.

SELECT 
  Orders.OrderNumber,
  LineItems.Quantity, 
  LineItems.Description
FROM 
  Orders
  INNER JOIN (
    SELECT
      Orders.OrderNumber,
      Max(LineItem.LineItemID) AS LineItemID
    FROM
      Orders INNER JOIN LineItems
      ON Orders.OrderNumber = LineItems.OrderNumber
    GROUP BY Orders.OrderNumber
  ) AS Items ON Orders.OrderNumber = Items.OrderNumber
  INNER JOIN LineItems 
  ON Items.LineItemID = LineItems.LineItemID
  • 2
    This is also much faster if your 'LineItemId' column is not indexed properly. Compared to the accepted answer. – GER Jan 20 '15 at 16:43
  • 2
    But how would you do this if Max is not usable as you need to order by a column different to the one you want to return? – NickG Apr 24 '15 at 16:04
  • 2
    you can order the derived table whichever way you want and use TOP 1 in SQL Server or LIMIT 1 in MySQL – stifin Jun 9 '15 at 10:39

You could do:

SELECT 
  Orders.OrderNumber, 
  LineItems.Quantity, 
  LineItems.Description
FROM 
  Orders INNER JOIN LineItems 
  ON Orders.OrderID = LineItems.OrderID
WHERE
  LineItems.LineItemID = (
    SELECT MIN(LineItemID) 
    FROM   LineItems
    WHERE  OrderID = Orders.OrderID
  )

This requires an index (or primary key) on LineItems.LineItemID and an index on LineItems.OrderID or it will be slow.

  • 1
    This does not work if an Orders has no LineItems. The sub-expression then evaluates LineItems.LineItemID = null and removes the left entity orders completely from the result. – leo Jul 2 '15 at 9:53
  • 4
    That's also the effect of the inner join, so... yeah. – Tomalak Jul 2 '15 at 9:58
  • 1
    Solution that can be adapted for LEFT OUTER JOIN: stackoverflow.com/a/20576200/510583 – leo Jul 2 '15 at 10:38
  • 2
    @leo Yes, but the OP used an inner join himself, so I don't understand your objection. – Tomalak Jul 2 '15 at 10:56

@Quassnoi answer is good, in some cases (especially if the outer table is big), a more efficient query might be with using windowed functions, like this:

SELECT  Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems2.Quantity, LineItems2.Description
FROM    Orders
LEFT JOIN 
        (
        SELECT  LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description, OrderId, ROW_NUMBER()
                OVER (PARTITION BY OrderId ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) AS RowNum
        FROM    LineItems

        ) LineItems2 ON LineItems2.OrderId = Orders.OrderID And RowNum = 1

Sometimes you just need to test which query gives better performance.

Correlated sub queries are sub queries that depend on the outer query. It’s like a for loop in SQL. The sub-query will run once for each row in the outer query:

select * from users join widgets on widgets.id = (
    select id from widgets
    where widgets.user_id = users.id
    order by created_at desc
    limit 1
)

,Another aproach using common table expression:

with firstOnly as (
    select Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description, ROW_NUMBER() over (partiton by Orders.OrderID order by Orders.OrderID) lp
    FROM Orders
        join LineItems on Orders.OrderID = LineItems.OrderID
) select *
  from firstOnly
  where lp = 1

or, in the end maybe you would like to show all rows joined?

comma separated version here:

  select *
  from Orders o
    cross apply (
        select CAST((select l.Description + ','
        from LineItems l
        where l.OrderID = s.OrderID
        for xml path('')) as nvarchar(max)) l
    ) lines

EDIT: nevermind, Quassnoi has a better answer.

For SQL2K, something like this:

SELECT 
  Orders.OrderNumber
, LineItems.Quantity
, LineItems.Description
FROM (  
  SELECT 
    Orders.OrderID
  , Orders.OrderNumber
  , FirstLineItemID = (
      SELECT TOP 1 LineItemID
      FROM LineItems
      WHERE LineItems.OrderID = Orders.OrderID
      ORDER BY LineItemID -- or whatever else
      )
  FROM Orders
  ) Orders
JOIN LineItems 
  ON LineItems.OrderID = Orders.OrderID 
 AND LineItems.LineItemID = Orders.FirstLineItemID

I solve a similar problem by using LEFT JOIN and GROUP BY Orders.OrderNumber. Is there a reason not to do it this way?

SELECT Orders.OrderNumber, LineItems.Quantity, LineItems.Description
FROM Orders
    LEFT JOIN LineItems 
    ON Orders.OrderID = LineItems.OrderID
GROUP BY Orders.OrderNumber

I'll answer your answer question with an answer in your own question:

Orders             LineItems
+-------------+    +---------+----------+---------------+
| OrderNumber |    | OrderID | Quantity | Description   |
+-------------+    +---------+----------+---------------+
| 22586       |    | 22586   | 17       | Trunion       |
+-------------+    | 22586   | 3        | Girdle Spring |
                   +---------+----------+---------------+

Joining the two together on OrderNumber gives:

OrderNumber  Quantity  Description
-----------  --------  -------------
22586        17        Trunion
22586        3         Girdle Spring

2 row(s) affected

Where we wanted it to to return only one row:

OrderNumber  Quantity  Description
-----------  --------  -------------
22586        17        Trunion

1 row(s) affected

This is why I use GROUP BY Orders.OrderNumber which only returns one row per OrderNumber.

  • 2
    This will not work for at least SQL Server. Will get is invalid in the select list because it is not contained in either an aggregate function or the GROUP BY clause. for the Columns not in the Group By. In a sense, this is because it's indeterminate which data to show from the non-Grouped columns. I.e. how does it know which row to pull when there's many? Not sure which DB you're using. – mmcrae Oct 16 '17 at 21:33
  • 1
    I ran this on MySql – smerlung Nov 22 '17 at 20:46

My favorite way to run this query is with a not exists clause. I believe this is the most efficient way to run this sort of query:

select o.OrderNumber,
       li.Quantity,
       li.Description
from Orders as o
inner join LineItems as li
on li.OrderID = o.OrderID
where not exists (
    select 1
    from LineItems as li_later
    where li_later.OrderID = o.OrderID
    and li_later.LineItemGUID > li.LineItemGUID
    )

But I have not tested this method against other methods suggested here.

Tried the cross, works nicely, but takes slightly longer. Adjusted line columns to have max and added group which kept speed and dropped the extra record.

Here's the adjusted query:

SELECT Orders.OrderNumber, max(LineItems.Quantity), max(LineItems.Description)
FROM Orders
    INNER JOIN LineItems 
    ON Orders.OrderID = LineItems.OrderID
Group by Orders.OrderNumber
  • 8
    But having max separately on two columns means the quantity might not be related to the description. If the order was 2 Widgets and 10 Gadgets, the query would return 10 Widgets. – Brianorca Aug 4 '15 at 23:52

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