144

Can someone please explain the difference between =, == and -eq in shell scripting?

Is there any difference between the following?

[ $a = $b ]
[ $a == $b ]
[ $a -eq $b ]

Is it simply that = and == are only used when the variables contain numbers?

197

It's the other way around: = and == are for string comparisons, -eq is for numeric ones. -eq is in the same family as -lt, -le, -gt, -ge, and -ne, if that helps you remember which is which.

== is a bash-ism, by the way. It's better to use the POSIX =. In bash the two are equivalent, and in plain sh = is the only one guaranteed to work.

$ a=foo
$ [ "$a" = foo ]; echo "$?"       # POSIX sh
0
$ [ "$a" == foo ]; echo "$?"      # bash specific
0
$ [ "$a" -eq foo ]; echo "$?"     # wrong
-bash: [: foo: integer expression expected
2

(Side note: Quote those variable expansions! Do not leave out the double quotes above.)

If you're writing a #!/bin/bash script then I recommend using [[ instead. The doubled form has more features, more natural syntax, and fewer gotchas that will trip you up. Double quotes are no longer required around $a, for one:

$ [[ $a == foo ]]; echo "$?"      # bash specific
0

See also:

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    @DJCrashdummy, [[ as a whole is a 1980s-era ksh-ism that bash (and many other shells) adopted. That's the whole point -- if you have [[ at all, then you can safely assume that all the extensions ksh implemented around it (fnmatch()-style pattern matching, ERE regular expressions with =~, and yes, suppression of string-splitting and filesystem globbing) will be available. Since [[ is non-POSIX syntax in its entirety, there's no additional portability loss in assuming that the features it was born with will be available. – Charles Duffy Jan 28 at 21:38
  • 1
    @DJCrashdummy, ...the link you show points out correctly that quotes are sometimes needed on the right-hand side of [[ $var = $pattern ]], if you want what would otherwise be interpreted as a fnmatch pattern to instead be interpreted as a literal string. The string foo has no non-literal interpretation, making leaving quotes out entirely safe; it's only if the OP wanted to match, say, foo* (with the asterisk as literal, not meaning anything that can come after the string foo) that quotes or escaping would be needed. – Charles Duffy Jan 28 at 21:46
  • @CharlesDuffy unfortunately i have no idea what are you referring to, because my comment seems to be deleted and i can't remember because it has been quite a time. :-( – DJCrashdummy Jan 29 at 16:38
  • @DJCrashdummy, ...huh, I assumed you'd withdrawn it yourself. Basically, it was an objection about unquoted expansions inside [[ being a bashism (indicating that that was the sole reason you weren't giving the answer a +1). – Charles Duffy Jan 29 at 16:39
  • @CharlesDuffy no, it's not the sole reason: beside the fact that i don't like bash-isms, ksh-isms etc. for simple tasks (it's just causes troubles and confuses beginners), i don't get it why mixing single braces [ ... ] and double equal sign ==. :-/ – DJCrashdummy Jan 29 at 16:59
28

It depends on the Test Construct around the operator. Your options are double parenthesis, double braces, single braces, or test

If you use ((...)), you are testing arithmetic equity with == as in C:

$ (( 1==1 )); echo $?
0
$ (( 1==2 )); echo $?
1

(Note: 0 means true in the Unix sense and non zero is a failed test)

Using -eq inside of double parenthesis is a syntax error.

If you are using [...] (or single brace) or [[...]] (or double brace), or test you can use one of -eq, -ne, -lt, -le, -gt, or -ge as an arithmetic comparison.

$ [ 1 -eq 1 ]; echo $?
0
$ [ 1 -eq 2 ]; echo $?
1
$ test 1 -eq 1; echo $?
0

The == inside of single or double braces (or test command) is one of the string comparison operators:

$ [[ "abc" == "abc" ]]; echo $?
0
$ [[ "abc" == "ABC" ]]; echo $?
1

As a string operator, = is equivalent to == and note the whitespace around = or == its required.

While you can do [[ 1 == 1 ]] or [[ $(( 1+1 )) == 2 ]] it is testing the string equality -- not the arithmetic equality.

So -eq produces the result probably expected that the integer value of 1+1 is equal to 2 even though the RH is a string and has a trailing space:

$ [[ $(( 1+1 )) -eq  "2 " ]]; echo $?
0

While a string comparison of the same picks up the trailing space and therefor the string comparison fails:

$ [[ $(( 1+1 )) ==  "2 " ]]; echo $?
1

And a mistaken string comparison can produce the complete wrong answer. '10' is lexicographically less than '2', so a string comparison returns true or 0. So many are bitten by this bug:

$ [[ 10 < 2 ]]; echo $?
0

vs the correct test for 10 being arithmetically less than 2:

$ [[ 10 -lt 2 ]]; echo $?
1

In comments, there is a question of the technical reason using the integer -eq on strings returns True for strings that are not the same:

$ [[ "yes" -eq "no" ]]; echo $?
0

The reason is that Bash is untyped. The -eq causes the strings to be interpreted as integers if possible including base conversion:

$ [[ "0x10" -eq 16 ]]; echo $?
0
$ [[ "010" -eq 8 ]]; echo $?
0
$ [[ "100" -eq 100 ]]; echo $?
0

And 0 if Bash thinks it is just a string:

$ [[ "yes" -eq 0 ]]; echo $?
0
$ [[ "yes" -eq 1 ]]; echo $?
1

So [[ "yes" -eq "no" ]] is equivalent to [[ 0 -eq 0 ]]

Last note: Many of the Bash specific extensions to the Test Constructs are not POSIX and therefore will fail in other shells. Other shells generally do not support [[...]] and ((...)) or ==.

| improve this answer | |
  • I'm curious about the technical reason for [[ "yes" -eq "no" ]] returning True. How does bash coerce these strings to integer values that can be compared? ;-) – odony May 11 '17 at 14:42
  • 4
    Bash variables are untyped so [[ "yes" -eq "no" ]] is equivalent to [[ "yes" -eq 0 ]] or [[ "yes" -eq "any_noninteger_string" ]] -- All True. The -eq forces integer comparison. The"yes" is interpreted as a integer 0; the comparison is True if the other integer is either 0 or the string result is 0. – dawg May 12 '17 at 19:55
  • Boo, hiss re: showing (nonportable) == in the code samples and only mentioning (portable, standardized) = underneath. – Charles Duffy Dec 5 '19 at 16:16
24

== is a bash-specific alias for = and it performs a string (lexical) comparison instead of a numeric comparison. eq being a numeric comparison of course.

Finally, I usually prefer to use the form if [ "$a" == "$b" ]

| improve this answer | |
  • 15
    Using == here is bad form, as only = is specified by POSIX. – Charles Duffy Oct 19 '15 at 5:45
  • 9
    If you really insist to use == then put it in between [[ and ]]. (And make sure that the first line of your script specifies to use /bin/bash.) – holgero Dec 21 '15 at 20:28
18

Guys: Several answers show dangerous examples. OP's example [ $a == $b ] specifically used unquoted variable substitution (as of Oct '17 edit). For [...] that is safe for string equality.

But if you're going to enumerate alternatives like [[...]], you must inform also that the right-hand-side must be quoted. If not quoted, it is a pattern match! (From bash man page: "Any part of the pattern may be quoted to force it to be matched as a string.").

Here in bash, the two statements yielding "yes" are pattern matching, other three are string equality:

$ rht="A*"
$ lft="AB"
$ [ $lft = $rht ] && echo yes
$ [ $lft == $rht ] && echo yes
$ [[ $lft = $rht ]] && echo yes
yes
$ [[ $lft == $rht ]] && echo yes
yes
$ [[ $lft == "$rht" ]] && echo yes
$
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Needs to be [ "$lht" = "$rht" ] with the quotes to be reliable even for equality. If you have a file created with touch 'Afoo -o AB', [ $lft = $rht ] will return true, even though that file name is not at all identical to AB. – Charles Duffy Dec 5 '19 at 16:15

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