195

I am getting a lot of decimals in the output of this code (Fahrenheit to Celsius converter).

My code currently looks like this:

def main():
    printC(formeln(typeHere()))

def typeHere():
    global Fahrenheit
    try:
        Fahrenheit = int(raw_input("Hi! Enter Fahrenheit value, and get it in Celsius!\n"))
    except ValueError:
        print "\nYour insertion was not a digit!"
        print "We've put your Fahrenheit value to 50!"
        Fahrenheit = 50
    return Fahrenheit

def formeln(c):
    Celsius = (Fahrenheit - 32.00) * 5.00/9.00
    return Celsius

def printC(answer):
    answer = str(answer)
    print "\nYour Celsius value is " + answer + " C.\n"



main()

So my question is, how do I make the program round every answer to the 2nd decimal place?

  • 5
    A small remark regarding your code. There is no reason to have the Fahrenheit value kept as a global, it is enough (and better) to transmit it as a parameter to your functions. So, remove the "global Fahrenheit" line. In the formeln function, rename the parameter to the function "Fahreinheit" formeln(Fahreinheit). As for the rounding, you can just use the "%" parameters to display only the first 2 digits, and it should be rounded for these digits. There is no effect to the number of digits provided in the formula in formeln. – arieli Dec 8 '13 at 18:39

13 Answers 13

342

You can use the round function, which takes as its first argument the number and the second argument is the precision after the decimal point.

In your case, it would be:

answer = str(round(answer, 2))
67

Using str.format()'s syntax to display answer with two decimal places (without altering the underlying value of answer):

def printC(answer):
    print("\nYour Celsius value is {:0.2f}ºC.\n".format(answer))

Where:

  • : introduces the format spec
  • 0 enables sign-aware zero-padding for numeric types
  • .2 sets the precision to 2
  • f displays the number as a fixed-point number
  • 2
    This is the most useful answer IMO - keeps the actual value intact and is simple to implement! Thanks! – BrettJ Dec 30 '17 at 0:08
  • Not sure why, but '{:0.2f}'.format(0.5357706) gives me '0.54' (python 3.6) – Noam Peled Apr 2 '18 at 2:00
  • 2
    @NoamPeled: Why shouldn't it? 0.5357... is closer to 0.54 than to 0.53, so rounding to 0.54 makes sense. – ShadowRanger Nov 19 '19 at 18:20
41

Most answers suggested round or format. round sometimes rounds up, and in my case I needed the value of my variable to be rounded down and not just displayed as such.

round(2.357, 2)  # -> 2.36

I found the answer here: How do I round a floating point number up to a certain decimal place?

import math
v = 2.357
print(math.ceil(v*100)/100)  # -> 2.36
print(math.floor(v*100)/100)  # -> 2.35

or:

from math import floor, ceil

def roundDown(n, d=8):
    d = int('1' + ('0' * d))
    return floor(n * d) / d

def roundUp(n, d=8):
    d = int('1' + ('0' * d))
    return ceil(n * d) / d
  • 1
    I upvoted - this is what I was looking for; I like your work with python-poloniex :D – Skylar Saveland Aug 13 '17 at 0:53
  • 2
    "values are rounded to the closest multiple of 10 to the power minus ndigits;" docs.python.org/3/library/functions.html#round so no, round does not always round up, e.g. round(2.354, 2) # -> 2.35 – Pete Kirkham Jan 13 '18 at 23:32
  • @PeteKirkham you are right, I edited my answer to make more sense and accurate. – s4w3d0ff Jan 19 '18 at 16:48
  • 2
    -0.54 is the correct answer for rounding -0.5357706 down because it is a negative number, -0.54 < -0.53 – s4w3d0ff Apr 10 '18 at 16:53
  • 2
    I would use 10**d instead of int('1' + ('0' * d)). – Jonathon Reinhart Mar 29 '19 at 1:49
9
float(str(round(answer, 2)))
float(str(round(0.0556781255, 2)))
6

Just use the formatting with %.2f which gives you rounding down to 2 decimals.

def printC(answer):
    print "\nYour Celsius value is %.2f C.\n" % answer
5

You want to round your answer.

round(value,significantDigit) is the ordinary solution to do this, however this sometimes does not operate as one would expect from a math perspective when the digit immediately inferior (to the left of) the digit you're rounding to has a 5.

Here's some examples of this unpredictable behavior:

>>> round(1.0005,3)
1.0
>>> round(2.0005,3)
2.001
>>> round(3.0005,3)
3.001
>>> round(4.0005,3)
4.0
>>> round(1.005,2)
1.0
>>> round(5.005,2)
5.0
>>> round(6.005,2)
6.0
>>> round(7.005,2)
7.0
>>> round(3.005,2)
3.0
>>> round(8.005,2)
8.01

Assuming your intent is to do the traditional rounding for statistics in the sciences, this is a handy wrapper to get the round function working as expected needing to import extra stuff like Decimal.

>>> round(0.075,2)

0.07

>>> round(0.075+10**(-2*6),2)

0.08

Aha! So based on this we can make a function...

def roundTraditional(val,digits):
   return round(val+10**(-len(str(val))-1), digits)

Basically this adds a really small value to the string to force it to round up properly on the unpredictable instances where it doesn't ordinarily with the round function when you expect it to. A convenient value to add is 1e-X where X is the length of the number string you're trying to use round on plus 1.

The approach of using 10**(-len(val)-1) was deliberate, as it the largest small number you can add to force the shift, while also ensuring that the value you add never changes the rounding even if the decimal . is missing. I could use just 10**(-len(val)) with a condiditional if (val>1) to subtract 1 more... but it's simpler to just always subtract the 1 as that won't change much the applicable range of decimal numbers this workaround can properly handle. This approach will fail if your values reaches the limits of the type, this will fail, but for nearly the entire range of valid decimal values it should work.

So the finished code will be something like:

def main():
    printC(formeln(typeHere()))

def roundTraditional(val,digits):
    return round(val+10**(-len(str(val))-1))

def typeHere():
    global Fahrenheit
    try:
        Fahrenheit = int(raw_input("Hi! Enter Fahrenheit value, and get it in Celsius!\n"))
    except ValueError:
        print "\nYour insertion was not a digit!"
        print "We've put your Fahrenheit value to 50!"
        Fahrenheit = 50
    return Fahrenheit

def formeln(c):
    Celsius = (Fahrenheit - 32.00) * 5.00/9.00
    return Celsius

def printC(answer):
    answer = str(roundTraditional(answer,2))
    print "\nYour Celsius value is " + answer + " C.\n"

main()

...should give you the results you expect.

You can also use the decimal library to accomplish this, but the wrapper I propose is simpler and may be preferred in some cases.


Edit: Thanks Blckknght for pointing out that the 5 fringe case occurs only for certain values here.

3

You can use the string formatting operator of python "%". "%.2f" means 2 digits after the decimal point.

def typeHere():
    try:
        Fahrenheit = int(raw_input("Hi! Enter Fahrenheit value, and get it in Celsius!\n"))
    except ValueError:
        print "\nYour insertion was not a digit!"
        print "We've put your Fahrenheit value to 50!"
        Fahrenheit = 50
    return Fahrenheit

def formeln(Fahrenheit):
    Celsius = (Fahrenheit - 32.0) * 5.0/9.0
    return Celsius

def printC(answer):
    print "\nYour Celsius value is %.2f C.\n" % answer

def main():
    printC(formeln(typeHere()))

main()

http://docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#string-formatting

1

You can use the round function.

round(80.23456, 3)

will give you an answer of 80.234

In your case, use

answer = str(round(answer, 2))

Hope this helps :)

1

Here is an example that I used:

def volume(self):
    return round(pi * self.radius ** 2 * self.height, 2)

def surface_area(self):
    return round((2 * pi * self.radius * self.height) + (2 * pi * self.radius ** 2), 2)
1

Not sure why, but '{:0.2f}'.format(0.5357706) gives me '0.54'. The only solution that works for me (python 3.6) is the following:

def ceil_floor(x):
    import math
    return math.ceil(x) if x < 0 else math.floor(x)

def round_n_digits(x, n):
    import math
    return ceil_floor(x * math.pow(10, n)) / math.pow(10, n)

round_n_digits(-0.5357706, 2) -> -0.53 
round_n_digits(0.5357706, 2) -> 0.53
  • This is truncating, not rounding. – ShadowRanger Nov 19 '19 at 18:22
1

You can use round operator for up to 2 decimal

num = round(343.5544, 2)
print(num) // output is 343.55
0

As you want your answer in decimal number so you dont need to typecast your answer variable to str in printC() function.

and then use printf-style String Formatting

0
round(12.3956 - 0.005, 2)  # minus 0.005, then round.

The answer is from: https://stackoverflow.com/a/29651462/8025086

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.