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Here is a typical Java job interview question. How many objects will be garbage collected by System.gc();?

I will use the following designations in the code:

  • a1 holds a reference to A1,
  • a2 holds a reference to A2,
  • mas holds a reference to Mas, and
  • list holds a reference to List.

Used class.

package com.mock;

public class GCTest {

    static class A {

        private String myName;

        public A(String myName) {
            this.myName = myName;
        }
    }
}

Usage.

package com.mock;

import com.mock.GCTest.A;

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A a1 = new A("a1"); // A ref to A1. 1 ref in all.
        A a2 = new A("a2"); // A ref to A2. 2 refs in all.
        ArrayList<A> list = new ArrayList<A>(); // A ref to the empty ArrayList. 3 refs in all.
        list.add(a1); // The list has a1 holding a ref to A1 
        A[] mas = new A[2]; // A ref to an array; it has nulls in it. 4 refs in all.
        mas[0] = a2; // Now mas holds the ref to A2.
        a2 = a1; // a2 holds the ref to A1 
        clear(mas); // Nothing changed because methods deals with copies of parameters rather than with parameters themselves. 
        a1 = null; // a1 no longer holds the ref to A1
        a2 = null; // a2 no longer holds the ref to A1
        System.gc(); // Nothing should be garbage collected
    }

    private static void clear(A[] mas) {
        mas = null;
    }

}
  • When you already have an answer you should post it as such. So I would recommend you to create an answer yourself and move the second part of your question. When you are right, you get some upvotes. When people call it out for being wrong, you can still delete it. – Philipp Dec 8 '13 at 18:34
  • 3
    The 'trick question' answer is: unknown, as calling System.gc() doesn't actually guarantee that a complete garbage collection cycle has been performed when it returns. – Confusion Dec 8 '13 at 18:53
  • Why would list be garbage collected? It's still an empty list at the end and thus not valid for garbage collection. – skiwi Dec 9 '13 at 7:48
  • In these kind of questions, it's never about "how many objects should be garbage collected" or "how many will be garbage collected" - it's about how many objects are eligible for garbage collection. – eis Dec 10 '13 at 6:19
  • @eis Not necessarily. There is always the possibility that the interviewer just doesn't know what he's talking about. – user207421 Dec 10 '13 at 6:21
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This may very well be a trick question.

What System.gc() does is dependend on the underlying garbage collector.

gc

public static void gc()

Runs the garbage collector.

Calling the gc method suggests that the Java Virtual Machine expend effort toward recycling unused objects in order to make the memory they currently occupy available for quick reuse. When control returns from the method call, the Java Virtual Machine has made a best effort to reclaim space from all discarded objects.

The call System.gc() is effectively equivalent to the call:

     Runtime.getRuntime().gc()


See Also:
    Runtime.gc()

What you do know is that:

  • Between 0 and "the number of Objects in your program" Objects will be garbage collected.
  • There is a very high likelyhood that it will be between 0 and "the number of Objects that should be garbage collected".
  • There is a relatively high likelyhood that it will garbage collect exactly "the number of Objects that should be garbage collected".
  • OK, let me rephrase my original question. How many objects should be garbage collected by System.gc()? – Maksim Dmitriev Dec 9 '13 at 4:50
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My answer is 0 because both list and the mas have elements holding references to A1 (list) and to A2 (mas).

I created three charts in order to simplify my answer. Rectangles correspond to the chunks in memory; circles correspond to objects. The gray arrows correspond to the references that no longer exist.

Before a1 = a2.

enter image description here

After a1 = a2.

enter image description here

Neither a1 nor a2 hold references

enter image description here

I could override finilize() for the class A to see what is eligible for gabage collection.

@Override
protected void finalize() throws Throwable {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    System.out.println("finalize: " + myName);
    super.finalize();
}

Although I saw logs while I was testing the code, there is no 100% guarantee that memory is clear after calling System.gc()

Runs the garbage collector.

Calling the gc method suggests that the Java Virtual Machine expend effort toward recycling unused objects in order to make the memory they currently occupy available for quick reuse. When control returns from the method call, the Java Virtual Machine has made a best effort to reclaim space from all discarded objects.

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    but then again, mas and list are not used after the System.gc() call, so an intelligent compiler or JIT could realize that he already can garbage collect all of the objects. No clue what the actual implementation does, but i wouldn't guarantuee that the objects are still in memory after that call. – kutschkem Dec 10 '13 at 6:45
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    If you consider an "intelligent compiler or JIT" the objects don't even need to be created. – Nicolas Dec 10 '13 at 10:27

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