18

For example, if loaded a text file into an std::string, did what I needed to do with it, then called clear() on it, would this release the memory that held the text? Or would I be better off just declaring it as a pointer, calling new when I need it, and deleting it when I'm done?

2
  • The allocated memory is not released with std::string::clear
    – P0W
    Dec 8 '13 at 18:49
  • It would be better to just not worry about this.
    – user529758
    Dec 8 '13 at 18:50
23

Calling std::string::clear() merely sets the size to zero. The capacity() won't change (nor will reserve()ing less memory than currently reserved change the capacity). If you want to reclaim the memory allocated for a string, you'll need to do something along the lines of

std::string(str).swap(str);

Copying the string str will generally only reserve a reasonable amount of memory and swapping it with str's representation will install the resulting representation into str. Obviously, if you want the string to be empty you could use

std::string().swap(str);
6
  • Thank you, you actually answered my question and gave me the reason why it is so.
    – chbaker0
    Dec 8 '13 at 18:54
  • @mebob Then please accept the answer. Here at StackOverflow, we don't say thank you, we upvote and accept answers instead.
    – Ali
    Dec 8 '13 at 22:46
  • Yes, I'm well aware. I planned to accept it once the lock was gone but I forgot.
    – chbaker0
    Dec 9 '13 at 0:15
  • 1
    Or just assign an empty string to it stringToClear = std::string() Apr 28 '15 at 9:07
  • 2
    @developerbmw Assigning an empty string to it could very easily just change size() without changing capacity(), like clear(). Apr 10 '17 at 14:13
8

The only valid method to release unused memory is to use member function shrink_to_fit(). Using swap has no any sense because the Standard does not say that unused memory will be released when this operation is used.

As an example

s.clear();
s.shrink_to_fit();
1
  • 7
    shrink_to_fit() "is a non-binding request to reduce capacity() to size(). It depends on the implementation if the request is fulfilled." So even if it releases memory today, the next time you upgrade the standard library, it may stop releasing. Apr 10 '17 at 14:12
2

I realized the OP is old but wanted to add some precision. I found this post when I was attempting to understand a behavior that seemed to contredict the answers provide here.

With gcc4.8.3, clear() might look like it's releasing memory in some scenario.

std::string local("this is a test");
std::cout << "Before clear: " << local.capacity() << '\n';
local.clear();
std::cout << "After clear:  " << local.capacity() << '\n';

As expected I get

    Before clear: 14
    After clear: 14

Now lets add another string into the mix:

std::string local("this is a test");
std::string ref(local);  // created from a ref to local
std::cout << "Before clear: " << local.capacity() << '\n';
local.clear();
std::cout << "After clear:  " << local.capacity() << '\n';

This time I get:

    Before clear: 14
    After clear: 0

Looks like stdc++ has some optimisation to, whenever possible, share the memory holding the string content. Depending if a string is shared or not the behavior will differ. In the last example, when clear() is called, a new instance of the internal of std::string local is created and it will be empty(). The capacity will be set to 0. One might conclude from the ouput of capacity() that some memory was freed, but that is not the case.

This can be proven with the following code:

std::string local("this is a test");
std::string ref(local);  // created from a ref to local
std::cout << (int*)local.data() << ' ' << (int*)ref.data() << '\n';

Will give:

    0x84668cc 0x84668cc

The two strings point to the same data, i was not execting that. Add a local.clear() or anything that modifies local or ref and the adresses will then differ, obviously.

Regards

1
  • Just wanted to add that the "shared string" optimization, aka CoW strings, you are witnessing was a pre-C++11 implementation detail of libstdc++ which was changed in gcc 5 because the C++11 standard forbid it.
    – 137
    Aug 20 '21 at 9:16
1

... would this release the memory that held the text?

No.

Or would I be better off just declaring it as a pointer ...

No, you'd be better off declaring the string in the scope in which it is needed, and letting its destructor be called. If you must release the memory in the scope which the string still exists, you can do this:

std::string().swap(the_string_to_clear);
3
  • I have it in a class that will exist for the lifetime of the program, so it isn't as simple as just declaring it in the scope in which it is needed. I don't need the string for the entire lifetime of the object, however I need it between multiple method calls.
    – chbaker0
    Dec 8 '13 at 18:53
  • @chbaker0 just defined a new scope using the curly braces. Scopes aren't limited to functions, you can declare a scope within a function just by enclosing code in curly braces. Apr 28 '15 at 9:09
  • @Brett "I have it in a class that will exist for the lifetime of the program, so it isn't as simple as just declaring it in the scope in which it is needed" directly contradicts your suggestion. I'm well aware of how scoping works in C++. Anyway, this question is nearly a year an a half old, so the original issue is no longer an issue anymore.
    – chbaker0
    Apr 29 '15 at 20:30

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