9

I am trying to remove a piece of a data from a json array. For example I have this array

var favorites =    {
        "userID": "12345678",
        "favorites": [

            {   "name" : "My Favorites",
                "id" : "87654321",
                "items": 
                [
                    { 
                        "productID": "11234567",
                        "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                        "title": "Project",
                        "type": "Weekend Project",
                        "imageURL": "1"
                    },

                    { 
                        "productID": "11223456",
                        "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                        "title": "Bathroom",
                        "type": "Weekend Project",
                        "imageURL": "2"
                    },

                    { 
                        "productID": "11223345",
                        "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                        "title": "Curves",
                        "type": "Collections",
                        "imageURL": "3"
                    }
                ]
            },
            {   "name" : "Bathroom",
            "id" : "87654323",
            "items": 
            [
                { 
                    "productID": "11122224",
                    "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                    "title": "Project",
                    "type": "Weekend Project",
                    "imageURL": "1"
                },

                { 
                    "productID": "11122222",
                    "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                    "title": "Room",
                    "type": "Weekend Project",
                    "imageURL": "2"
                },

                { 
                    "productID": "11112222",
                    "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                    "title": "Strais",
                    "type": "Collections",
                    "imageURL": "3"
                },

                { 
                    "productID": "11111222",
                    "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                    "title": "Door",
                    "type": "Collections",
                    "imageURL": "4"
                }
            ]
        }
        ]
    } 

Say I wanted to remove the a product out of the bathroom category on the click of a button. How would I acheive this?

I have been trying this to no avail:

jQuery(document).on('click', ".removeFav", function() {
    favorites.favorites[1].items[1].splice();
}

error I am receiving:

Uncaught TypeError: Object # has no method 'splice'

  • this looks a lot like object litteral not a json array XD – Jaak Kütt Dec 8 '13 at 20:51
  • splice() is an array method. with ...items[1].splice() you are calling it on an array item not the array itself. read more from developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Jaak Kütt Dec 8 '13 at 20:54
  • FYI, "JSON" is a text format designed for data interchange. What you have here is a javascript object. – jfriend00 Dec 8 '13 at 22:00
17

To unset any variable use the delete statement:

delete favorites.favorites[1].items[1]

This is correct way, and it will work, but if your goal is to preserve indexes in order, then your way with the splice method is the way to go:

favorites.favorites[1].items.splice(1,1);

The above will remove one element (second parameter) starting at 1st index (first parameter).

So to be clear: to remove the last element use this:

var arr = favorites.favorites[1].items;
arr.splice(arr.length - 1, 1);

See your code on JsFiddle.

You can take additional measures to protect the code in case the array is not set or empty:

var arr = favorites.favorites[1].items;
if ( arr && arr.length ) {
    arr.splice(arr.length - 1, 1);
}
  • 1
    Issue with this is that you will have index 0, 2, 3 left in your array – Eric Herlitz Dec 8 '13 at 20:54
  • I have tried this and it works for my situation, but it returns the array with a null, in the place of the deleted object. Is there a way to prevent this so that it just removes it and leaves nothing? – EHerman Dec 8 '13 at 20:58
  • 1
    The purpose of the delete operator is to remove properties from an object, not to remove items from an array (see this article for details). If the OP wants to simply clear the object from that item in the array, they can just set it to null. If they want to remove that item from the array entirely, then .splice() is the right tool. – jfriend00 Dec 8 '13 at 21:02
  • The purpose of delete is to remove an object from memory. In JS arrays happen to also be objects. – Maciej Sz Dec 8 '13 at 21:06
  • @jfriend00: There would be a slight but important difference between setting to null and using delete. That is that the native iterator methods will skip the index if delete was used, but not if it was set to null. That said, .splice() is probably what is ultimately needed. – Blue Skies Dec 8 '13 at 21:07
4

If you want to actually remove an item from the array so that all items after it in the array move down to lower indexes, you would use something like this:

favorites.favorites[1].items.splice(1, 1);

You want to operate on the actual items array which means calling methods on the items array. For .splice(), you pass the index where you want to start modifying the array and then the number of items to remove thus .splice(1, 1) which will remove 1 item starting at index 1.

  • @EHerman - then you need to look at what favorites.favorites[1].items actually is. One way to do that is to do a console.log(favorites.favorites[1].items) and then in the debug console, look at it. The code in your question says that should be an array which would have a .splice() method, but maybe something is different in your actual code than what you show in your question. – jfriend00 Dec 8 '13 at 21:53
2

I would most likely built a prototype method for this that makes the command a bit more simple to use

// Place anywhere
Object.prototype.cut = function(start, elements){
    return this.items.splice(start, elements);
}

// Call using this
favorites.favorites[1].cut(1,1);

This way you can extend methods and play around with the data in a very flexible way.

== EDIT ==

Maybe it was to flexible as Blue Skies pointed out. Updated example below. My style would be to add the favorites json to an object literal and include the methods you need in the literal. This example consists of the

  • JSON Data
  • a method to cut elements based on index
  • a method to get a favorite based on index
  • a method to return a favorite based on parameter name-value

Snippet

var favorites = {
    data: {
        "userID": "12345678",
        "favorites": [{
            "name": "My Favorites",
            "id": "87654321",
            "items": [{
                "productID": "11234567",
                "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                "title": "Project",
                "type": "Weekend Project",
                "imageURL": "1"
            }, {
                "productID": "11223456",
                "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                "title": "Bathroom",
                "type": "Weekend Project",
                "imageURL": "2"
            }, {
                "productID": "11223345",
                "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                "title": "Curves",
                "type": "Collections",
                "imageURL": "3"
            }]
        }, {
            "name": "Bathroom",
            "id": "87654323",
            "items": [{
                "productID": "11122224",
                "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                "title": "Project",
                "type": "Weekend Project",
                "imageURL": "1"
            }, {
                "productID": "11122222",
                "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                "title": "Room",
                "type": "Weekend Project",
                "imageURL": "2"
            }, {
                "productID": "11112222",
                "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                "title": "Strais",
                "type": "Collections",
                "imageURL": "3"
            },

            {
                "productID": "11111222",
                "added": "TIMESTAMP",
                "title": "Door",
                "type": "Collections",
                "imageURL": "4"
            }]
        }]
    },
    cut: function(favorite, start, elements) {
        return this.data.favorites[favorite].items.splice(start, elements);
    },
    get: function(favorite) {
        return this.data.favorites[favorite];
    },
    find: function(value, param) {
        var found;
        this.data.favorites.filter(function(item, i) {
            if (item[param] === value) {
                found = item;
                return;
            };
        })
        return found;
    }
};

To use the find simply do something like this

favorites.find("Bathroom", "name")
  • You'd inherit a method to every single object in order for it to operate on one specific object type? Not to mention that it will now require a .hasOwnProperty() on every iteration of every for-in loop. Also, that property will come up in every lookup for a .cut property, whether or not it was the expected one. Yikes! – Blue Skies Dec 8 '13 at 21:07
  • Then place it in the same context as where you execute your functionality. Also hasOwn was implemeted already in ie6. – Eric Herlitz Dec 8 '13 at 21:18
  • The issue is all the ramifications of putting a method like that on Object.prototype. Especially for such a limited use as to be used for only those object that have an .items property that points to an Array. All that just to do .cut(1,1) instead of .items.splice(1,1) isn't a great idea. – Blue Skies Dec 8 '13 at 21:24
  • I do understand your point but with such mindset we would never extend on prototypes. It's about scoping and scoping alone, this is a useful approach if the scope is right. – Eric Herlitz Dec 8 '13 at 22:55
  • Not all native prototypes are an issue. Object.prototype is an exceptional case. I mean one can do it if one decides to, but I don't think it should be given as an example to beginners. At least not without a thorough description of the ramifications. – Blue Skies Dec 8 '13 at 23:28

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