35

This is an example of what I need to do:

var myarray = [5, 10, 3, 2];

var result1 = myarray[0];
var result2 = myarray[1] + myarray[0];
var result3 = myarray[2] + myarray[1] + myarray[0];
var result4 = myarray[3] + myarray[2] + myarray[1] + myarray[0];

so all that would output 5, 15, 18, 20

but instead of writing out all the vars like that, I want it to say something like:

var result = arrayitem + the sum of any previous items 

Does that make sense? Is that possible? How do I do that?

18 Answers 18

35

An elegant solution copied from Nina Scholz, using currying to access the previous value.

const cumulativeSum = (sum => value => sum += value)(0);

console.log([5, 10, 3, 2].map(cumulativeSum));

cumulativeSum is the function value => sum += value, with sum initialized to zero. Every time it's called, sum is updated and will equal the previous value (output[n-1]) when called the next time (with input[n]).

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    @olefrank From the start, sum is 0. cumulativeSum is called with 5, so sum += 5 adds 5 to sum and returns sum. Then it's called with 10, so sum becomes 15. Then 3, 18 and 2, 20. – JollyJoker Oct 15 '19 at 13:53
  • 1
    I'm still perplexed by the way that cumulativeSum works. How does map know to update sum each iteration? How does sum even survive its being assigned the argument (0)? (Fwiw, it still works with no argument in place of 0.) Is this arrow function black magic? – JohnK May 20 at 23:41
  • 2
    Nice and short, but you have to be aware that you can run it only once, since sum keeps its value, and the next time you call cumulativeSum it will have retained its old value. So, works only repeatedly if you have cumulativeSum in some local scope and use it only once therein... – Elmar Zander May 26 at 22:49
  • @ElmarZander Yeah, it would be better to just inline the code instead of declaring a function to make sure it won't be reused. – JollyJoker May 27 at 8:28
  • 1
    Or define cumulativeSum as const cumulativeSum = (sum => value => sum += value); and then call it with array.map(cumulativeSum(0)); – Kyle Barron Jun 10 at 4:37
26

Javascript's reduce provides the current index, which is useful here:

var myarray = [5, 10, 3, 2];
var new_array = [];
myarray.reduce(function(a,b,i) { return new_array[i] = a+b; },0);
new_array // [5, 15, 18, 20]
| improve this answer | |
19

Alternative reduce approach that avoids making new arrays:

var result = myarray.reduce(function(r, a) {
  r.push((r.length && r[r.length - 1] || 0) + a);
  return r;
}, []);

There's no need to re-sum the subarrays for each result.

edit less ugly version of the same thing:

var result = myarray.reduce(function(r, a) {
  if (r.length > 0)
    a += r[r.length - 1];
  r.push(a);
  return r;
}, []);
| improve this answer | |
  • @raina77ow yes I just added a less goofy version of the same idea :) – Pointy Dec 9 '13 at 18:02
  • 2
    Simply r[r.length - 1] || 0, no need for ifs. – georg Dec 9 '13 at 18:10
  • @thg435 yes that'd work too and that's probably what I'd write in real code, but the if makes it a little easier to understand. – Pointy Dec 9 '13 at 18:13
12

A couple more options with ES6 array spreading

[1, 2, 3].reduce((a, x, i) => [...a, x + (a[i-1] || 0)], []); //[1, 3, 6]

or

[3, 2, 1].reduce((a, x, i) => [...a, a.length > 0 ? x + a[i-1] : x], []); //[3, 5, 6]
| improve this answer | |
5

Simple solution using ES6

let myarray = [5, 10, 3, 2];
    let new_array = [];  
    myarray.reduce( (prev, curr,i) =>  new_array[i] = prev + curr , 0 )
    console.log(new_array);

For more information Array.reduce()

Arrow function

| improve this answer | |
  • You might want to elaborate your answer on how and why that code will solve the problem here. – UmarZaii Aug 13 '17 at 8:54
3

How about this solution

var new_array = myarray.concat(); //Copy initial array

for (var i = 1; i < myarray.length; i++) {
  new_array[i] = new_array[i-1] + myarray[i];
}

console.log(new_array);

PS: You can use the original array as well. I just copied it in case we don't want to pollute it.

| improve this answer | |
  • You don't really need to start with a copy of the other array, but yes this is a nice O(n) solution :) – Pointy Dec 9 '13 at 17:58
  • @Pointy I was just mentioning the same thing in my edit..You are quicker ;) – sachinjain024 Dec 9 '13 at 17:59
  • Doesn't it need to say new_array[i] = (new_array[i-1] || 0) + myarray[i]; in order to prevent new_array from being filled with NaN? – Moss Oct 17 '14 at 0:31
  • @Moss 1. The loop is running from index 1 not 0 So it saves us from NaN case. yeah you can do that. I won't do any harm. – sachinjain024 Oct 17 '14 at 9:02
  • Oh yeah, I didn't notice that. Your way is better. – Moss Oct 18 '14 at 23:33
2

This question has been answered well by others but I'll leave my solution here too. I tried to be concise without sacrificing clarity.

myarray.reduce((a, e, i) => {
  // a: Accumulator; e: current Element; i: current Index
  return a.length > 0 ? [...a, e + a[i - 1]] : [e];
}, []);

Map, Filter, Reduce, Find, Some, etc. are highly underrated.

| improve this answer | |
1

A more generic (and efficient) solution:

Array.prototype.accumulate = function(fn) {
    var r = [this[0]];
    for (var i = 1; i < this.length; i++)
        r.push(fn(r[i - 1], this[i]));
    return r;
}

or

Array.prototype.accumulate = function(fn) {
    var r = [this[0]];
    this.reduce(function(a, b) {
        return r[r.length] = fn(a, b);
    });
    return r;
}

and then

r = [5, 10, 3, 2].accumulate(function(x, y) { return x + y })
| improve this answer | |
1

use reduce to build the result directly and non-destructively.

a.reduce(function(r,c,i){ r.push((r[i-1] || 0) + c); return r }, [] );
| improve this answer | |
1

Simple solution using for loop

var myarray = [5, 10, 3, 2];

var output = [];
var sum = 0;

for(var i in myarray){
  sum=sum+myarray[i];
  output.push(sum)
}
console.log(output)

https://jsfiddle.net/p31p877q/1/

| improve this answer | |
1

Another clean one line solution with reduce and concat

var result = myarray.reduce(function(a,b,i){ return i === 0 ?  [b]: a.concat(a[i-1]+b);},0);
//[5, 10, 3, 2] => [5, 15, 18, 20]
| improve this answer | |
  • This is an excellent solution if you still have to support browsers without fat arrow functions!! – Caleb Haldane Apr 10 '19 at 23:13
1

My initial ES6 thought was similar to a few above answers by Taeho and others.

const cumulativeSum = ([head, ...tail]) =>
   tail.reduce((acc, x, index) => {
      acc.push(acc[index] + x);
      return acc
  }, [head])
console.log(cumulativeSum([-1,2,3])

The solution performs:

n lookups, n - 1 sums and 0 conditional evaluations

Most of what I saw above appeared to use:

n lookups, 2n sums, and n conditional evaluations:

You could do this with ie6 safe js as well. This is possibly more efficient since you don't have to create the tail spread array.

function cumulativeSum(a) {
    var result = [a[0]];
    var last = a[0];
    for (i = 1; i < a.length; i++) {
        last = last + a[i];
        result.push(last)
    }
    return result;
}
console.log(cumulativeSum([-1,2,3]))
| improve this answer | |
1

A simple function using array-reduce.

const arr = [6, 3, -2, 4, -1, 0, -5];

const prefixSum = (arr) => {

  let result = [arr[0]]; // The first digit in the array don't change
  arr.reduce((accumulator, current) => {
       result.push(accumulator + current);

       return accumulator + current; // update accumulator
  });
  return result;
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Returns sorted obj by key and sorted array!!!

var unsorted_obj = {
  "2016-07-01": 25,
  "2016-07-04": 55,
  "2016-07-05": 84,
  "2016-07-06": 122,
  "2016-07-03": 54,
  "2016-07-02": 43
};

var sort_obj = function(obj){
  var keys = [];
  var sorted_arr = [];
  var sorted_obj = {};

  for(var key in obj){
    if(obj.hasOwnProperty(key)){
      keys.push(key);
    }
  }

  keys.sort();

  jQuery.each(keys, function(i, key){
    sorted_obj[key] = obj[key];
    var val = obj[key];
    sorted_arr.push({
      idx: i,
      date: key,
      val: val
    })
  });

  return { sorted_obj: sorted_obj, sorted_arr: sorted_arr };

};

var sorted_obj = sort_obj(unsorted_obj).sorted_obj;
var sorted_arr = sort_obj(unsorted_obj).sorted_arr;

// sorted_arr = [{"idx":0,"date":"2016-07-01","val":25},{"idx":1,"date":"2016-07-02","val":43},{"idx":2,"date":"2016-07-03","val":54},...]
// sorted_obj = {"2016-07-01":25,"2016-07-02":43,"2016-07-03":54,...}
| improve this answer | |
0

To keep the cumsum within a function until fully built, I offer this minor variant on Matt's Answer:

var cumsum = function(past_sums, new_value) {
  var last_sum = 1*past_sums.slice(-1);
  var new_sum = last_sum + new_value;
  return past_sums.concat([new_sum]);
}
var some_sums = [5, 10, 3, 2].reduce(cumsum, []);

Here's how it works:

  • The first cycle:
    • past_sums.slice(-1) === []
    • 1*past_sums.slice(-1) === 0
  • All but the last cycle:
    • cumsum returns [past_sums and new_sum] as next cycle's past_sums
  • The last cycle:
    • cumsum returns [5, 15, 18, 20] as the output Array some_sums

It can be written with fewer lines:

var cumsum = function(sums, val) {
  return sums.concat([ val + 1*sums.slice(-1) ]);
}
var some_sums = [5, 10, 3, 2].reduce(cumsum, []);

With Arrow Functions (Not for ≤IE11 or Opera Mini), I'd write this:

var cumsum = (sums,val) => sums.concat([ val + 1*sums.slice(-1) ]);
var some_sums = [5, 10, 3, 2].reduce(cumsum, []);
| improve this answer | |
0

Use arrow function instead of function, comma operator instead of return, and currentIndex in reduce callback.

[5, 10, 3, 2].reduce((r, a, i) => (r.push((i && r[i - 1] || 0) + a), r), []); // [ 5, 15, 18, 20 ]
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    A direct solution is welcome, but please ensure you add context around the link so your fellow users will have some idea what it is – pratibha Jan 26 '18 at 3:00
0
/**
 * Turn an array of numbers to cumulative sum array
 * @param { Array } [1,2,3,4,5]
 * @return { Array } [1,3,6,10,15]
 */

const accumulate = (a, c) => a + c

const cusum = arr => arr.map((v, i, data) => {
    return data.slice(0, i + 1).reduce(accumulate)
})
| improve this answer | |
  • This has O(N^2) run time. A prefix sum algorithm should run in linear time... – Elmar Zander May 26 at 22:48
0

Old school and simpler :

let myarray = [5, 10, 3, 2], result = [];

for (let i = 0, s = myarray[0]; i < myarray.length; i++, s += myarray[i]) result.push(s);

console.log(result); // [5, 15, 18, 20]
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.