17

I'm gathering data on how much my cats poop into a matrix:

m <- cbind(fluffy=c(1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4),misterCuddles=c(0.9,NA,1.1,1.0))
row.names(m) <- c("2013-01-01", "2013-01-02", "2013-01-03","2013-01-04")

Which gives me this:

           fluffy misterCuddles
2013-01-01    1.1           0.9
2013-01-02    1.2            NA
2013-01-03    1.3           1.1
2013-01-04    1.4           1.0

On every date, I'd like to know how many days in a row each cat has gone number 2. So the resulting matrix should look like this:

           fluffy misterCuddles
2013-01-01      1             1
2013-01-02      2             0
2013-01-03      3             1
2013-01-04      4             2

Is there a way to do this efficiently? The cumsum function does something similar, but that's a primitive so I can't modify it to suit my dirty, dirty needs.

I could run a for loop and store a count like so:

m.output <- matrix(nrow=nrow(m),ncol=ncol(m))
for (column in 1:ncol(m)) {
  sum <- 0
  for (row in 1:nrow(m)) {
    if (is.na(m[row,column])) sum <- 0
    else sum <- sum + 1

    m.output[row,column] <- sum
  }
}

Is this the most efficient way to do this? I have a lot of cats, and I've recorded years worth of poop data. Can I parallellize this by column somehow?

  • How do the numbers work? How is it that fluffy, eg, pooped 1.1 times? – gung - Reinstate Monica Dec 10 '13 at 14:30
  • 2
    @gung thank you for taking the time to fully understand the problem. those are the weights in deca-pennies. so 1.1 means it weighed the same as 11 pennies. – dvmlls Dec 10 '13 at 14:32
  • Hmmm, given that fluffy pooped 1.4 grams on Jan 4th, how do you know he (?) pooped 4 times? misterCuddles pooped once on the 3rd for 1.1g, but twice on the 4th for 1.0g; I don't see the pattern. – gung - Reinstate Monica Dec 10 '13 at 14:36
  • @gung on january 4th, fluffy had pooped 4 days in-a-row. because mister cuddles didn't poop on january 2nd, january 3rd was the first day in-a-row that she pooped. – dvmlls Dec 10 '13 at 14:38
  • 1
    @gung more like "how do you find the number of days since the last NA value" ? – dvmlls Dec 10 '13 at 14:42
5

This should work. Note that each of your cats is an independent individual so you can turn your data frame into a list and use mclapply which uses a paralleled approach.

count <- function(y,x){
  if(is.na(x)) return(0)
  return (y + 1)
}

oneCat = m[,1]

Reduce(count,oneCat,init=0,accumulate=TRUE)[-1]

EDIT: here is the full answer

count <- function(x,y){
 if(is.na(y)) return(0)
 return (x + 1)
}

mclapply(as.data.frame(m),Reduce,f=count,init=0,accumulate=TRUE)

EDIT2: The main bad problem is that I do get extra 0's at the beginning so...

result = mclapply(as.data.frame(m),Reduce,f=count,init=0,accumulate=TRUE)
finalResult = do.call('cbind',result)[-1,]
rownames(finalResult) = rownames(m)

does the job.

  • This is nice, you should apply it and you don't appear to use mclapply despite talking about it...? – Thomas Dec 10 '13 at 14:59
  • Also, under the hood this is still just a for-loop. – Thomas Dec 10 '13 at 15:02
  • well the main point is to use Reduce with accumulate=TRUE. – Usobi Dec 10 '13 at 15:07
  • this is fancy. it results in a list of named vectors. what's the best way to get it back into my matrix format? – dvmlls Dec 10 '13 at 15:19
  • 2
    @Usobi No, it's the same as cbind(a,b,c,d) since it passes the list content to the function parameters. – Roland Dec 10 '13 at 15:54
11

All of the answers here are actually too complicated (including my own, from earlier, copied below). The Reduce family of answers is just masking a for-loop in a single function call. I like Roland's and Ananda's, but both I think have a little too much going on.

Thus, here's a simple vectorized solution:

reset <- function(x) {
    s <- seq_along(x)
    s[!is.na(x)] <- 0
    seq_along(x) - cummax(s)
}

> apply(m, 2, reset)
     fluffy misterCuddles
[1,]      1             1
[2,]      2             0
[3,]      3             1
[4,]      4             2

It also works on Roland's example:

m2 <- cbind(fluffy=c(NA,1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.0,2),
           misterCuddles=c(NA,1.3,2,NA,NA,1.1,NA))

> apply(m2, 2, reset)
     fluffy misterCuddles
[1,]      0             0
[2,]      1             1
[3,]      2             2
[4,]      3             0
[5,]      4             0
[6,]      5             1
[7,]      6             0

From earlier: this is not vectorized, but also works:

pooprun <- function(x){
    z <- numeric(length=length(x))
    count <- 0
    for(i in 1:length(x)){
        if(is.na(x[i]))
            count <- 0
        else
            count <- + count + 1
        z[i] <- count
    }
    return(z)
}
apply(m, 2, pooprun)

> apply(m, 2, pooprun)
     fluffy misterCuddles
[1,]      1             1
[2,]      2             0
[3,]      3             1
[4,]      4             2

THE BENCHMARKING

Here I simply wrap everyone's answers in a function call (based on their name).

> library(microbenchmark)
> microbenchmark(alexis(), hadley(), thomas(), matthew(), thomasloop(), usobi(), ananda(), times=1000)
Unit: microseconds
         expr     min       lq   median       uq       max neval
     alexis()   1.540   4.6200   5.3890   6.1590   372.185  1000
     hadley()  87.755   92.758   94.298  96.6075  1767.012  1000
     thomas()  92.373  99.6860 102.7655 106.6140   315.223  1000
    matthew() 128.168 136.2505 139.7150 145.4880  5196.344  1000
 thomasloop() 133.556 141.6390 145.1030 150.4920 84131.427  1000
      usobi() 148.182 159.9210 164.7320 174.1620  5010.445  1000
     ananda() 720.507 742.4460 763.6140 801.3335  5858.733  1000

And here are the results for Roland's example data:

> microbenchmark(alexis(), hadley(), thomas(), matthew(), thomasloop(), usobi(), ananda(), times=1000)
Unit: microseconds
         expr     min       lq   median       uq      max neval
     alexis()   2.310   5.3890   6.1590   6.9290   75.438  1000
     hadley()  75.053   78.902   80.058   83.136 1747.767  1000
     thomas()  90.834  97.3770 100.2640 104.3050  358.329  1000
    matthew() 139.715 149.7210 154.3405 161.2680 5084.728  1000
 thomasloop() 144.718 155.4950 159.7280 167.4260 5182.103  1000
      usobi() 177.048 188.5945 194.3680 210.9180 5360.306  1000
     ananda() 705.881 729.9370 753.4150 778.8175 8226.936  1000

Note: Alexis's and Hadley's solutions took quite a while to actually define as functions on my machine, whereas the others work out-of-the-box, but Alexis's is otherwise the clear winner.

  • 1
    Your vectorized solution doesn't work. Try it on a vector with several NA values. – Roland Dec 10 '13 at 15:15
  • 1
    trying microbenchmark on my 2500x2500 matrix: on windows, your solution is 10x faster than ananda's, which in turn is 10x faster than usobi's. on linux running mclapply with 64 cores: yours is marginally faster than ananda's (3.1s versus 3.8s), which are both about twice as fast as usobi's (7.7s) – dvmlls Dec 10 '13 at 23:06
4

Another option, similar @Usobi's in that it uses Reduce, but with a slightly different approach:

apply(!is.na(m), 2, Reduce, f=function(x,y) if (y) x + y else y, accumulate=TRUE)
#      fluffy misterCuddles
# [1,]      1             1
# [2,]      2             0
# [3,]      3             1
# [4,]      4             2
  • ou this is better, my approach does get extra 0's in the first row – Usobi Dec 10 '13 at 15:19
4

I had saved a snippet from here that translates almost exactly for a problem like this:

countReset <- function(x) {
  x[!is.na(x)] <- 1
  y <- ave(x, rev(cumsum(rev(is.na(x)))), FUN=cumsum)
  y[is.na(y)] <- 0
  y
}
apply(m, 2, countReset)
#            fluffy misterCuddles
# 2013-01-01      1             1
# 2013-01-02      2             0
# 2013-01-03      3             1
# 2013-01-04      4             2
  • this is a little cryptic so making sure i understand what's happening. doing a cumsum on the values that are NA in effect groups the values that are not NA. then the ave function runs a cumsum on each group. – dvmlls Dec 10 '13 at 16:51
  • @davez0r, Yes. You can read more about Bill Dunlap's explanation here (where he also shares a less mind-bending way to achieve the creation of the groups). – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Dec 10 '13 at 17:05
  • mind: bent. do i need the calls to rev in my scenario? i don't think so. testing... – dvmlls Dec 10 '13 at 17:20
  • yes, need the calls to rev – dvmlls Dec 10 '13 at 17:45
4

Since I'm in a period where I'm trying to get used to .Call, here's another idea that seems to work and -probably- is fast. (Don't take my word for it, though, my skills are not trustworthy!!):

library(inline)  #use "inline" package for convenience

f <- cfunction(sig = c(R_mat = "numeric", R_dims = "integer"), body = '
 R_len_t *dims = INTEGER(R_dims);
 R_len_t rows = dims[0], cols = dims[1];
 double *mat = REAL(R_mat);

 SEXP ans;
 PROTECT(ans = allocMatrix(INTSXP, rows, cols));
 R_len_t *pans = INTEGER(ans);

 for(int ic = 0; ic < cols; ic++)
  {
   pans[0 + ic*rows] = ISNA(mat[0 + ic*rows]) ? 0 : 1;

   for(int ir = 1; ir < rows; ir++)
    {
     if(ISNA(mat[ir + ic*rows]))
      {
       pans[ir + ic*rows] = 0;
      }else
      {
       if(!ISNA(mat[(ir - 1) + ic*rows]))
        {
         pans[ir + ic*rows] = pans[(ir - 1) + ic*rows] + 1;
        }else
        {
         pans[ir + ic*rows] = 1;
        }
      }
    }
  }

 UNPROTECT(1);

 return(ans);
')

f(m, dim(m))
#     [,1] [,2]
#[1,]    1    1
#[2,]    2    0
#[3,]    3    1
#[4,]    4    2
f(mm, dim(mm))   #I named Roland's matrix, mm ; I felt that I had to pass this test!
#     [,1] [,2]
#[1,]    0    0
#[2,]    1    1
#[3,]    2    2
#[4,]    3    0
#[5,]    4    0
#[6,]    5    1
#[7,]    6    0
  • I added yours to the benchmarking in my answer. Very nice. – Thomas Dec 10 '13 at 22:50
  • 1
    @Thomas: Cool! Timing my fynction, though, on larger matrices, the relative difference of speeds falls. See, for example, mat = matrix(as.vector(m), nrow = 1e3, ncol = 1e3) ; microbenchmark(f(m, dim(m)), apply(m, 2, reset), times = 10) ; microbenchmark(f(mat, dim(mat)), apply(mat, 2, reset), times = 10). – alexis_laz Dec 10 '13 at 23:00
  • 1
    Still really fast, though. – Thomas Dec 10 '13 at 23:02
3

So the solution to this problem has two parts:

  1. A function that accepts a vector per cat and returns a vector telling me at each date, how many days since the last NA
  2. A function that accepts an NxM matrix and returns an NxM matrix, applying function (1) to each column

For (2), I adapted this from @Usobi's answer:

daysSinceLastNA <- function(matrix, vectorFunction, cores=1) {
  listResult <- mclapply(as.data.frame(matrix), vectorFunction, mc.cores=cores)
  result <- do.call('cbind', listResult)
  rownames(result) <- rownames(matrix)
  result
}

For (1), I have two solutions:

@ananda-mahto's solution:

daysSinceLastNA_1 <- function(vector) {
  vector[!is.na(vector)] <- 1
  result <- ave(vector, rev(cumsum(rev(is.na(vector)))), FUN=cumsum)
  result[is.na(result)] <- 0
  result
}

@Usobi's solution:

daysSinceLastNA_2 <- function(vector) {
  reduction <- function(total, additional) ifelse(is.na(additional), 0, total + 1)
  Reduce(reduction, vector, init=0, accumulate=TRUE)[-1]
}

Then I call them like this:

> system.time(result1 <- daysSinceLastNA (test, daysSinceLastNA_1 ))
   user  system elapsed 
   5.40    0.01    5.42 
> system.time(result2 <- daysSinceLastNA (test, daysSinceLastNA_2 ))
   user  system elapsed 
  58.02    0.00   58.03 

On my test dataset, which is roughly a 2500x2500 matrix, the first approach is an order of magnitude faster.

If I run on linux with 64 cores, solution (1) runs in 2 seconds, and solution (2) runs in 6 seconds.

  • really interesting. That vectorized algorithm is really worth remembering. – Usobi Dec 10 '13 at 19:09
  • 1
    Use library(microbenchmark) to get more reliable benchmarks...system.time will be inconsistent since it's only looking at one execution. – Thomas Dec 10 '13 at 22:19
3

For this sort of problem, which is easily solved with a for loop, I find Rcpp a very natural answer.

library(Rcpp)

cppFunction("NumericVector cumsum2(NumericVector x) {
  int n = x.length();
  NumericVector out(x);

  for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    if (NumericVector::is_na(x[i]) || i == 0) {
      x[i] = 0;
    } else {
      x[i] = x[i - 1] + 1;
    }
  }

  return out;
}")

The code requires a little more bookkeeping than the equivalent R code, but the bulk of the function is a very simple for loop.

You can then apply in R like any other vectorised function:

m2 <- cbind(
  fluffy=c(NA,1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.0,2),
  misterCuddles=c(NA,1.3,2,NA,NA,1.1,NA)
)

apply(m2, 2, cumsum2)

You could of course make the C++ code iterate over the columns of the matrix, but I think that since this is already easily expressed in R, you might as well use the built in tools.

  • 1
    Applied to the original data, this produces the incorrect result (you should remove the || i==0 logical). I've also added this to the benchmarking in my answer. – Thomas Dec 11 '13 at 16:17

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