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I'm trying to sort out "good numbers" from "bad" ones. My problem is that some of the numbers I'm getting from the textfile contain spaces (" "). These functions identify them by splitting on spaces so that all lines that contain spaces show up as bad numbers regardless of whether they are good or bad.

Anyone got any idea how to sort them out? I'm using this right now.

def showGoodNumbers():
    print ("all good numbers:")
    textfile = open("textfile.txt", "r")
    for line in textfile.readlines():
        split_line = line.split(' ')
        if len(split_line) == 1:
            print(split_line) # this will print as a tuple
    textfile.close

def showBadNumbers():
    print ("all bad numbers:")
    textfile = open("textfile.txt", "r")
    for line in textfile.readlines():
        split_line = line.split(' ')
        if len(split_line) > 1:
            print(split_line) # this will print as a tuple
    textfile.close

The text file looks like this (all entries with a comment are "bad"):

  • 13513 51235
  • 235235-23523
  • 2352352-23 - not valid
  • 235235 - too short
  • 324-134 3141
  • 23452566246 - too long
  • 3
    please specify exactly the requirements for good and/or bad numbers you have. – Nicoretti Dec 10 '13 at 14:25
  • @Ojayer So what is your definition of "good" and "bad" words here? – Ray Dec 10 '13 at 14:25
  • uhm well i got a program that checks whether a social security number is valid or invalid. Regardless it writes the number in a textfile and if the number is bad it has a comment next to it. i want to be able to "call" the valid and invalid numbers seperatly. – Ojayer Dec 10 '13 at 14:28
  • print(split_line) # this will print as a tuple this will NOT print as a tuple -> (1,) you need comma – Lukasz Madon Dec 10 '13 at 14:30
  • And last lines for both functions should be textfile.close(), right? – Ray Dec 10 '13 at 14:34
1

String manipulation is all you needed here.

allowed_chars = ['-', '.', ' ', '\n']
with open("textfile.txt", "r") as fp:
    for line in fp:
        line_check = line
        for chars in allowed_chars:
            line_check = line_check.replace(chars, '')
        if line_check.isdigit():
            print "Good line:", line
        else:
            print "Bad line:", line

you can add any number of characters to allowed_chars list. Just for your ease of adding characters. I added \n in the allowed_chars list so that the trailing newline character will also be handled, based on the comments.

  • this do sounds great but somehow it says all my lines are bad lines... gonna try it some more. – Ojayer Dec 10 '13 at 14:48
  • you should remove the trailing newline as well – moooeeeep Dec 10 '13 at 14:53
  • i got it working! thanks alot :) – Ojayer Dec 10 '13 at 15:05
  • @moooeeeep That's a good catch. I edited the code to handle trailing newline character as well. – thiruvenkadam Dec 11 '13 at 9:56
5

This is (yet another) classic example of where the Python re module really shines:

from re import match


with open("textfile.txt", "r") as f:
    for line in f:
        if match("^[0-9- ]*$", line):
            print "Good Line:", line
        else:
            print "Bad Line:", line

Output:

Good Line: 13513 51235

Good Line: 235235-23523

Bad Line: 2352352-23 - not valid

Bad Line: 235235 - too short

Good Line: 324-134 3141

Bad Line: 23452566246 - too long
  • hm ye i dont really understand regular expression that good but somehow it says my list contains bad lines only.. not sure why – Ojayer Dec 10 '13 at 14:54
  • Start learning! Read through the link I posted in my answer. It should guide you through basic regex and even has some HowTo(s). – James Mills Dec 10 '13 at 14:55
  • Also if my solution doesn't work for your input file(s) then I'd suggest you need to revisit your problem and your input data. We can only work with what you present us :) Anyway I think you have enough to go on by yourself... – James Mills Dec 10 '13 at 14:56
  • ye i found it i had newlines i wasn't aware of :p thanks alot for the help! – Ojayer Dec 10 '13 at 16:15

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