22

Consider the following program:

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
  A( ) { std::cout << "A()\n"; }

  A( A& ) = delete;

  A( int i ) { std::cout << "A( " << i << " )\n"; }

  explicit operator int( ) { std::cout << "operator int()\n"; return 42; }
};

template< typename T = A > void f( T a = A() ) {}

int main( void )
{
  f();
  return 0;
}

Visual Studio 2013 compiles this code and runs, with output

A()
operator int()
A( 42 )

Is this a compiler bug? It looks like the VS compiler doesn't heed the 'explicit' keyword in this context. From my understanding, VS 2013 wrongly uses operator int() in combination with A(int) to sort-of 'copy-construct' A as the default parameter for f.

Both adding

A a;
A a1( a );

to main and declaring f as

void f( A a = A() ) {}

does not compile, VS complains that A(A&) is deleted, which seems to be correct behavior. Only in the context of the function template default parameter the combination of operator int() and A(int) seem to work as a substitution for A( A& ).

g++ 4.7.3 does not compile the code and complains:

main.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
main.cpp:21:7: error: no matching function for call to ‘A::A(A)’
main.cpp:21:7: note: candidates are:
main.cpp:10:3: note: A::A(int)
main.cpp:10:3: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘A’ to ‘int’
main.cpp:6:3: note: A::A()
main.cpp:6:3: note:   candidate expects 0 arguments, 1 provided

Removing 'explicit' makes g++ compile the code and the output is the same.

  • 6
    Applying explicit to conversion operators (as opposed to constructors) is new in C++11. Maybe the version of VC++ you're using simply hasn't implemented that feature yet (or maybe the flags you're using don't enable it)? – Jeremy Roman Dec 10 '13 at 15:19
  • 1
    msvc allows non-const references to temporaries, I wouldnt be surprised if they chose to do things that way because they like it more. – PlasmaHH Dec 10 '13 at 15:20
  • @JeremyRoman the feature was newly introduced in VS 2013 and it correctly works in the two last examples, so I guess the support for explicit was just overlooked in this context? – KAI42 Dec 10 '13 at 15:25
  • @Mgetz if I either make A( A& ) = delete; or A( A& ) {} private the code still compiles and the output is still the same. – KAI42 Dec 10 '13 at 15:49
  • 1
    @Mgetz: 21 : error : no matching function for call to ‘A::A( A )’ f( 42 ); ^ 21 : note : candidates are : 10 : note : A::A( int ) A( int i ) { std::cout << "A( " << i << " )\n"; } ^ 10 : note : no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘A’ to ‘int’ 6 : note : A::A( ) A( ) { std::cout << "A()\n"; } ^ 6 : note : candidate expects 0 arguments, 1 provided sorry it doesn't look like I can format code here ;) 4.8 still complains. clang does too, and icc too. I used gcc.godbolt.org to try this. – KAI42 Dec 10 '13 at 16:05
7

This is definitely a bug in Visual C++. According to standard:

12.3.2 Conversion functions [class.conv.fct]

2 - A conversion function may be explicit (7.1.2), in which case it is only considered as a user-defined conversion for direct-initialization (8.5) in certain contexts (13.3.1.4, 13.3.1.5, 13.3.1.6).

and there is no direct-initialization in your example.

Other C++ compilers such as GCC and Clang report an error in this case.

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