22

I'm defining my application models and i have separate files for each model that i'm defining, my question is, i need to create a model that use a sub-document, but that's on another file, how can i use that Schema on my model ? what i mean is that all examples i've seen declare the Child model and the Parent on the same file, example:

var childSchema = new Schema({ name: 'string' });

var parentSchema = new Schema({
  children: [childSchema]
});

I have one file called user.js that defines the user model :

var mongoose  = require('mongoose');
var Schema    = mongoose.Schema;

var userSchema = new Schema({

  _id           : Schema.Types.ObjectId,
  username      : String,

});


module.exports = mongoose.model( 'User', userSchema );

And on another file called sport.js i have the other model definition for the sports:

var mongoose  = require('mongoose');
var Schema    = mongoose.Schema;

var sportSchema = new Schema({

  _id       : Schema.Types.ObjectId,
  name      : String

});

module.exports = mongoose.model( 'Sport', sportSchema );

So on my user model I need to define a field for the sports that the user will follow, but i do not know how to define that sub-document since the sports definition is on another file, I tried this:

var mongoose  = require('mongoose');
var Schema    = mongoose.Schema;
var SportsModel = require('sport');

var userSchema = new Schema({

  _id           : Schema.Types.ObjectId,
  username      : String,
 sports         : [SportsModel]

});


module.exports = mongoose.model( 'User', userSchema );

But i'm not sure if that's the correct way since what i'm exporting is the model, not the Schema.

Thanks in advance, i want to define each model on separate files to maintain order.

55

You can access a Model's schema via its schema property. So this should work:

var userSchema = new Schema({    
  _id           : Schema.Types.ObjectId,
  username      : String,
  sports        : [SportsModel.schema]    
});
9

Use ref

var mongoose  = require('mongoose');
var Schema    = mongoose.Schema;

var userSchema = new Schema({
    _id     : Schema.Types.ObjectId,
    username: String,
    sports  : [{ type: Schema.Types.ObjectId, ref: 'Sport' }]
});

module.exports = mongoose.model('User', userSchema);

Incidentally, with ref, you can use .populate('sports') when you query, and mongoose will expand those types for you.

  • Awesome thank you very much, And why the type is ObjectID ? – kevinblanco Dec 10 '13 at 19:32
  • It's essentially the equivalent of a foreign key in SQL. But ref only works with the built in ObjectId type. – tandrewnichols Dec 10 '13 at 20:42
  • Using populate can be very dangerous. It is pretty much an anti-pattern when it comes to document based databases, like MongoDB. It is better to use subdocuments if you do not need to share your sports between users. Basically, it is important to remember MongoDB is not a relational database. – catalyst294 Mar 14 '15 at 19:18
  • 2
    @catalyst294 You might be right . . . but the way you've stated it sounds like pure opinion. You don't give any reasons why it's dangerous or references that show that it's an anti-pattern. (And for what it's worth, a simple google search does not turn up any such references.) I understand you're trying to be helpful, but it would probably help other users more if you gave reasons and support. – tandrewnichols Mar 14 '15 at 19:43
  • 2
    @tandrewnichols The Mongoose can tricks you into thinking populate is a very quick easy operation to perform (link and link). But what populate does is generate another query. I have worked on projects where the schema was designed poorly and these populated became very expensive. With document DBs you should favor data duplication over doing these populates (basically joins) where you are able. HTH folks – catalyst294 Mar 14 '15 at 20:08

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