3

So I've been going through the tests on codility and got bit stuck with the "Max Counters" one (link https://codility.com/demo/take-sample-test/max_counters). My first, and obvious solution was the following one:

def solution(N, A):

    counters = N * [0];    

    for a in A:
        if 1 <= a <= N:
            counters[a - 1] += 1;
        elif a == N + 1:
            counters = N * [max(counters)];

    return counters

which works just fine, but takes too much time, due to the fact that each call to max counters fills an entire array.

So I came up with the following solution which seems to work ok for small inputs, but randomly provides incorrect results for medium and large ones.

def solution(N, A):

    counters = N * [0];
    current_max = 0;
    last_update = 0;

    for a in A:
        if 1 <= a <= N:
            counters[a - 1] += 1;

            if counters[a - 1] < last_update:
                counters[a - 1] = last_update + 1;

            if counters[a - 1] > current_max:
                current_max = counters[a - 1];

        elif a == N + 1:
            last_update = current_max;

    for i in xrange(len(counters)):
        if counters[i] < last_update:
            counters[i] = last_update;           

    return counters

I can't seem to figure out what's wrong with it.

Edit: Result - http://codility.com/demo/results/demoQA7BVQ-NQT/

  • 1
    Unbounded to your problem but in python you do not need semi collon. – chaiyachaiya Dec 10 '13 at 22:42
  • That's right. Haven't used python in a while. – jaho Dec 10 '13 at 22:47
  • What's the purpose of the last loop ? – chaiyachaiya Dec 10 '13 at 23:06
  • I don't get it. The only way to put the same value to all the counter is to have A[K]=N+1 . Why comparing with last-update each element of the counter ? – chaiyachaiya Dec 10 '13 at 23:16
  • It's to avoid having to update the whole array each loop and instead do it only once after the loop, for those counters which were not present in the input array. If you print A, current_max, last_update each loop you'll see what's going on. – jaho Dec 10 '13 at 23:44

15 Answers 15

1

One problem is here:

counters[a - 1] += 1
if counters[a - 1] < last_update:
    counters[a - 1] = last_update + 1

what if counters[a - 1] was last_update - 1?

| improve this answer | |
  • Of course. Moving the first line after else statement solves the problem. – jaho Dec 11 '13 at 0:32
11

Check this one (python, get's 100 score):

The secret is not to update all the counters every time you get the instruction to bump them all up to a new minimum value. This incurs an operation involving every counter on every occasion, and is the difference between a ~60% score and a 100% score.

Instead, avoid this hit by keeping track of the current minimum and maximum values; using and updating them for each counter you visit.

Then, after all the instructions are processed, because there may be counters which haven't been touched with their own personal update since the last update-all instruction, pass over the counters themselves and ensure they are at the minimum value.

def solution(N, A):
    res = [0] * N
    max_val = 0
    last_update = 0
    n1 = N+1
    for i in A:
        if i < n1:
            if res[i-1] < last_update:
                res[i-1] = last_update

            res[i-1]+=1

            if res[i-1] > max_val:
                max_val = res[i-1]
        else:
            last_update = max_val

    for i in xrange(len(res)):
        if res[i] < last_update:
            res[i] = last_update

    return res

http://codility.com/demo/results/demoF3AMPT-FVN/

| improve this answer | |
1

You can take a look at my solution(written in C# though):

public static int[] solution(int N, int[] A)
    {
        // write your code in C# with .NET 2.0
        var counters = new int[N];
        var defaultValueToInitialize = 0;
        var maxElement = 0;


        //initializing the counters values, without increasing the N+1 actions
        foreach (var num in A)
        {
            if (num == N + 1)
            {
                defaultValueToInitialize = maxElement;
                counters = new int[N];
            }
            else
            {
                counters[num - 1]++;
                if (counters[num - 1] + defaultValueToInitialize > maxElement)
                    maxElement = counters[num - 1] + defaultValueToInitialize;
            }

        }

        //adding the increased default value to each cell

        for (int i = 0; i < counters.Length; i++)
        {
            counters[i] += defaultValueToInitialize;
        }

        return counters;
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for posting but "counters = new int[N];" isn't necessary in the foreach loop is it? (EDIT: Oh I get it. That is necessary. It resets counters to all zeros.) – sgryzko Nov 5 '15 at 15:48
1

Consider this 100/100 solution in Ruby:

# Algorithm:
#
# * Maintain a maximum value.
# * For each `increase(X)` command update respective counter.
# * For each `max_counter` command save the current max as `set_max` for later use.
# * Once the loop is over, make an adjustment pass to set all values less than `set_max` to `set_max`.
def solution(n, commands)
  max = set_max = 0
  counters = Array.new(n, 0)

  commands.each do |cmd|
    if cmd <= n
      # This is an `increase(X)` command.
      value = [counters[cmd - 1], set_max].max + 1
      counters[cmd - 1] = value
      max = [value, max].max
    else
      # This is a `max_counter` command.
      # Just update `set_max`.
      set_max = max
    end
  end

  # Finalize -- set counters less than `set_max` to `set_max`.
  counters.map! {|value| [value, set_max].max}

  # Result.
  counters
end

#--------------------------------------- Tests

def test
  sets = []
  sets << ["1", [1], 1, [1]]
  sets << ["sample", [3, 2, 2, 4, 2], 5, [3, 4, 4, 6, 1, 4, 4]]

  sets.each do |name, expected, n, commands|
    out = solution(n, commands)
    raise "FAILURE at test #{name.inspect}: #{out.inspect} != #{expected.inspect}" if out != expected
  end

  puts "SUCCESS: All tests passed"
end
| improve this answer | |
1

Javascript 100/100

function solution(N, A) {
    var max = 0,
        offset = 0,
        counters = Array.apply(null, Array(N)).map(function () {return 0;});

    A.forEach(function (d) {
        if (d === N + 1) {
            offset = max;
        }
        else {
            counters[d-1] = Math.max(offset + 1, counters[d-1] + 1);
            max = Math.max(counters[d-1], max);
        }
    });

    counters.map(function (d, i) {
        if (d < offset) {
            counters[i] = offset;
        }
    });

    return counters;
}
| improve this answer | |
1

C# - a 100/100 solution

public int[] solution(int N, int[] A) {
    // write your code in C# 6.0 with .NET 4.5 (Mono)
    int[] counter = new int[N];
    int maxValue = 0;
    int minValue = 0;
    for(int i=0;i<A.Length;i++)
    {
        //less than or equal to length N
        if(A[i] <= N)
        {
            if(counter[A[i] - 1] < minValue)
            {
                counter[A[i] - 1] = minValue;
            }
            counter[A[i] - 1] += 1;
            if(counter[A[i] - 1] > maxValue)
            {
                maxValue = counter[A[i] - 1];
            }
        }
        else if(A[i] == N+1)
        {
            minValue = maxValue;
        }
    }
    for(int j=0;j<counter.Length;j++)
    {
        if(counter[j] < minValue)
        {
            counter[j] = minValue;
        }
    }
    return counter;
}
| improve this answer | |
0

My python version only scores 66 points as it's a little too slow for the later tests.

def solution(N, A):
    counters = [0 for x in range(N)]
    for elem in A:
        if elem > N:
            cmax = max(counters)
            counters = [cmax for x in range(N)]
        else:
            counters[elem-1] += 1
    return counters
| improve this answer | |
0

100/100 solution in C

struct Results solution(int N, int A[], int M) {
    struct Results result;
    int *cnts = calloc(N,sizeof(int));
    int i=0,maxcnt=0,j=0,lastcnt=0;
    for (i=0;i<M;i++) {
        if (A[i]<=N && A[i]>=1) {
            if (cnts[A[i]-1] < lastcnt)
                cnts[A[i]-1] = lastcnt + 1;
            else
                cnts[A[i]-1] += 1;
            if (cnts[A[i]-1] > maxcnt)
                maxcnt = cnts[A[i]-1];
        }
        if (A[i] == N+1) {
                lastcnt = maxcnt;
        }
    }
    for (j=0;j<N;j++) {
            if (cnts[j]<lastcnt)
                cnts[j] = lastcnt;
    }
    result.C = cnts;
    result.L = N;
    return result;
}
| improve this answer | |
0

I have got 77% with this solution in java:

Can anyone suggest me the 100% solution ?

 import java.util.Arrays;
 class Solution {
 public int[] solution(int N, int[] A) {

 int maxCounter=0;
 int[] B=new int[N];

 for(int i=0;i<A.length;i++){

 if(A[i]==N+1){
 setMaximum(B, maxCounter);
 }
 else{
 B[A[i]-1]++;               
 if(maxCounter<B[A[i]-1]){
 maxCounter=B[A[i]-1];
 }

 }
 }
 return B;
 }

 void setMaximum(int[] B,int maxValue){
 for(int i=0;i<B.length;i++){
 B[i]=maxValue;
 }

 }
 }
| improve this answer | |
0

MaxCounters solution in C

struct Results solution(int N, int A[], int M) {
    struct Results result;
    // write your code in C90
    int i,k=0,max_v=0;

    result.C =(int*)(malloc(N*sizeof(int)));
    result.L = N;   
    memset(result.C, 0, N*sizeof(int));  

    for(i=0;i<M;i++)
    {      
        if (A[i] > N)    
            max_v=k;
        else
        {
            if(result.C[A[i]-1] < max_v)
                result.C[A[i]-1]=max_v;

            result.C[A[i]-1]+=1; 

            if(result.C[A[i]-1] > k)
                k=result.C[A[i]-1];
        }   
    }

    for(i=0;i<N;i++)
    {
        if(result.C[i] < max_v)
            result.C[i]=max_v;
    }

    return result;
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Javascript 100/100

function solution(N, A) {
    
    var j, len = A.length, lastBase = 0, max = 0, 
        counters = [], n1 = N+1;

    for(j=0; j<N; j+=1){
        counters[j]=0; //initArray
    }
    
    for(j=0; j < len; j+=1){
        if(A[j]<n1){
            if(counters[A[j]-1] < lastBase) {
                counters[A[j]-1] = lastBase;
            }
            counters[A[j]-1] += 1;
            if(max < counters[A[j]-1]) {
                max = counters[A[j]-1];
            }
        } else {
            lastBase = max;
        }
    }
    
    for(j=0; j<N; j+=1){
        if(counters[j] < lastBase) {
            counters[j] = lastBase;
        }
    }
    
    return counters;
    
}

| improve this answer | |
0

This is a modified version of @jacoor's solution with slightly more idiomatic python and variable names and if statement conditions more closely reflecting the problem description.

def fast_solution(N, A):
    counters = [0] * N
    max_counter = 0
    last_update = 0

    for K,X in enumerate(A): # O(M)
        if 1 <= X <= N:
            counters[X-1] = max(counters[X-1], last_update)
            counters[X-1] += 1
            max_counter = max(counters[X-1], max_counter)
        elif A[K] == (N + 1):
            last_update = max_counter

    for i in xrange(N): # O(N)
        counters[i] = max(counters[i], last_update)

    return counters

https://codility.com/demo/results/demo6KPS7K-87N/

| improve this answer | |
0
Java solution -->


    public int[] solution(int N, int[] A) {
        // write your code in Java SE 8
        int[] counter = new int[N];
        int maxCounter = 0;
        int pos;
        int last_max=0;
        for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
            if (A[i] <= N) {
                pos = A[i];

                if (counter[pos - 1] < last_max)
                    counter[pos - 1] = last_max;
                counter[pos - 1] += 1;

                if (maxCounter < counter[pos - 1])
                    maxCounter = counter[pos - 1];
            }
            else{
                last_max=maxCounter;
            }
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < counter.length; i++) {
            if (counter[i] < last_max)
                counter[i] = last_max;
        }
        return counter;
    }
| improve this answer | |
0

C++ 100/100

The key is to IGNORE the sample iteration in the problem, it will lead you to a O(m*n) time complexity solution.

vector<int> solution(int N, vector<int> &A) {
// write your code in C++11

vector<int> counters(N,0);

int last_reset = 0, max_count = 0;

for( unsigned int a=0; a < A.size(); ++a)
{
     int current_int = A.at (a);

     if (current_int == (N+1))
     {
        last_reset = max_count;
     }
     else
     {
        unsigned int counter_index = current_int - 1;

        if ( counters.at (counter_index) < last_reset)
            counters.at (counter_index) = last_reset + 1;
        else
            ++counters.at (counter_index);
        if ( counters.at (counter_index) > max_count)
            max_count = counters.at (counter_index);
     }

}
for( unsigned int n=0; n < counters.size(); ++n)
{
    if ( counters.at (n) < last_reset)
        counters.at (n) = last_reset;
}
return counters;

}

| improve this answer | |
0

here is the shortest solution in Python:

def solution(N, A):
    out = [0 for _ in range(N)]
    for ele in A:
        if ele<=N: out[ele-1] += 1
        else: out = [max(out) for i in range(len(out))]           
    return out
| improve this answer | |
  • calling max() on out list each time reduces the time complexity. – Stephinext Jul 29 at 4:04

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