3

I am still learning the ins and outs of C#, from a Python background.

With that in mind, let's say I am making a game. For simplicity's sake, let's base it on Magic: the Gathering or any other popular collectible card game. In such a game, there are multiple cards that can be played. These cards would have different types and effects. for example, there can be a creature card, and there might be a spell card.

These types of cards have different attributes. A creature would, for example, have an attack attribute and a health attribute, while a spell might have an effect attribute. However, these different types would still be cards, and have multiple things in common, like a cost attribute. These different cards might be managed by a Manager class. A basic code sample from such a game might look like this:

public class Manager
{
    public CreatureCard card1 = new CreatureCard();
    public SpellCard card2 = new SpellCard();
}

public class Card
{
    public int cost;
}

public class CreatureCard : Card
{
    public int attack;
    public int health;
}

public class SpellCard : Card
{
    public SpellEffect effect;
}

What I basically want to do, is create cards and store them in the manager class without knowing whether they're a spell or a creature in advance. The manager class might then look like this:

public class Manager
{
    public Card card1;
    public Card card2;
}

The cards would be assigned from somewhere else.

Now, this doesn't really work. There would be no way of accessing a card's health attribute, for example. This is pretty logical, as the card might not even have a health attribute. This is why I am looking for an approach that does work, while keeping the structure about the same. So there would be a Card class, that has lotsa stuff in it, and other classes derived from it (CreatureCard, SpellCard).

Is there a way to make this work? I am coming from Python here, so this approach might actually be totally wrong in C#. If so, please tell me what kind of approach I could use instead of the one I'm trying to get to work right now.

  • Can you give an example of how you would ideally use the cards through the manager object? In other words, how would you know whether to access the health or the effect field of a card? – rae1 Dec 11 '13 at 16:51
  • I would basically use the infamous duck typing. For example: this cards has been attacked (so its health has to be modified), so it must be a creature. There is of course code in place to prevent the player from attacking a spell card. – Lokkij Dec 11 '13 at 18:03
  • Just a thought ti add here. To me this sounds like a nice opportunity for the Strategy design pattern. You would define a "Fight" method in your interface and inject in different fight behaviour classes – Crudler Dec 27 '13 at 5:33
4

You can do it by casting the Card instance appropriately:

public class Manager
{
    public Card card1;
    public Card card2;
}

...
var manager = new Manager 
{
    card1 = new CreatureCard();
    card2 = new SpellCard();
}
if (manager.card1 is CreatureCard)
{
    var health = ((CreatureCard)manager.card1).Health;
    Console.WriteLine(health);
}
if (manager.card2 is SpellCard)
{
    var effect = ((SpellCard)manager.card2).effect;
    Console.WriteLine(effect);
}

Or like this:

var creatureCard = manager.card1 as CreatureCard;
var spellCard = manager.card2 as SpellCard;
if (creatureCard != null)
{
    Console.WriteLine(creatureCard.health);
}
if (spellCard != null)
{
    Console.WriteLine(spellCard.effect);
}

To expand on this:

  • To test if a card is of a specified type, use the is operator:

    bool isCardType = myCard is CardType;
    
  • Use (CardType) to cast / convert the card to the specified type:

    CardType specificCardType = (CardType)myCard;
    
  • To safely cast a card to a specific type or return null if it's not of that type, use the as operator:

    CardType specificCardType = myCard as CardType;
    if (specificCardType != null) {
        ...
    }
    
  • 1
    I would also mention that if there might be multiple classes of cards that have particular attributes you care about, that you might want to pull in this manner, you would want to create interfaces for those attributes (or sets of related attributes), have your classes implement those interfaces, and then use the same logic as above, but checking if the object is the interface and if so, casting to the interface directly, rather than checking for individual classes. If there'll only be one class with each property, that isn't so necessary, though. – neminem Dec 11 '13 at 18:18
  • Thanks, this is basically what I was looking for. It doesn't exactly look pretty though; is there a nicer way of writing this? @neminem I am already doing that, I just didn't want to make the example more complicated. Thanks for the advice though :) – Lokkij Dec 11 '13 at 18:22
  • @Lokkij C# is (normally) statically typed, so you need to give the compiler some hints about how you're using the objects. You could theoretically use dynamic which causes all member access to be resolved at run-time, but that's both inefficient and bad practice. What exactly did you have in mind? – p.s.w.g Dec 11 '13 at 18:34
  • @p.s.w.g I just meant that ((SpellCard)manager.card2).Effect instead of manager.card2.effect makes the code look more convoluted, less readable, and I always like to keep my code as clean and readable as possible. – Lokkij Dec 11 '13 at 19:38
  • @Lokkij Using as is a common trick since it's safe and looks a little better. See my updated answer for an example. Of course, you have to check for null. – p.s.w.g Dec 11 '13 at 19:57

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