34

In golang documentation, it is stated that :

These are predefined layouts for use in Time.Format and Time.Parse. The reference time used in the layouts is:

Mon Jan 2 15:04:05 MST 2006

which is Unix time 1136239445

What is the origin of this specific date ?

2
  • 2
    15:04:05 is just after 3PM ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 ? – jthill Dec 11 '13 at 21:36
  • 6
    This date contains no ambigous fields. If I write 2/2006.1, 4/3.5 it's entirely clear which number belongs to which part of the date. – fuz Dec 11 '13 at 21:44
61

That's explained immediately after the section you quoted:

Since MST is GMT-0700, the reference time can be thought of as

01/02 03:04:05PM '06 -0700

It's a simple increasing sequence: 01 02 03 04 05 (PM) 06 07.

Using 03:04 PM rather than 03:04 AM makes it possible to show the two time representations 15:04 and 03:04PM more clearly (this is speculation on my part).

4
  • 3
    Why didn't they just use 2001-02-03 03:04:05PM -0700 or something like that. :( Would be so much easier to remember than 2nd of January 2006. – AndreKR Aug 28 '17 at 7:38
  • 1
    @AndreKR: Why do you need to remember it? – Keith Thompson Aug 28 '17 at 15:18
  • @KeithThompson I came here because I had to google it because I had written time.ParseInLocation(" and that doesn't have the reference date in the inline docs. First world problem, definitely. – AndreKR Aug 28 '17 at 15:24
  • KeithThompson: Because it’s a mnemonic device, and any mnemonic device worth its salt has to be easy to remember. To that end, MDY is sub-par, but MDTY is worse. :-P @AndreKR: My guess is that it’s because it’s the default format used by date(1). As for why date(1) is the way it is, I have wondered that myself for years. It’s worth noting it was written in ’Murica during the pre-ISO-8601, pre-RFC-2822 dark ages, and is now a deeply-rooted part of UNIX history. But for the real answer, we’d probably have to ask Ken Thompson. – Mark G. Sep 3 '18 at 21:15
18

It is just the numbers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1: month (January, Jan, 01, etc)

2: day

3: hour (15 is 3pm on a 24 hour clock)

4: minute

5: second

6: year (2006)

7: timezone (GMT-7 is MST)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.