164

I'm having problems rounding. I have a float, which I want to round to the hundredth of a decimal. However, I can only use .round which basically turns it into an int, meaning 2.34.round # => 2. Is there a simple effect way to do something like 2.3465 # => 2.35

0

9 Answers 9

413

Pass an argument to round containing the number of decimal places to round to

>> 2.3465.round
=> 2
>> 2.3465.round(2)
=> 2.35
>> 2.3465.round(3)
=> 2.347
7
  • 9
    This would seem more sensible than multiplying, rounding and dividing. +1 Jan 13, 2010 at 11:41
  • 3
    Hmm this method doesn't seem to be in ruby 1.8.7. Maybe in 1.9? Feb 27, 2011 at 0:40
  • 2
    @Brian. This is definitely in 1.9 and is also in rails (Which this question was tagged with)
    – Steve Weet
    Feb 28, 2011 at 0:09
  • 3
    Ruby 1.8.7's round method doesn't have this ability, adding the decimal place rounding parameter is a 1.9 ability
    – bobmagoo
    Jan 15, 2013 at 21:54
  • 3
    Note that you don't get trailing zeros with this, so 1.1.round(2) => 1.1 not 1.10 Nov 10, 2017 at 16:19
190

When displaying, you can use (for example)

>> '%.2f' % 2.3465
=> "2.35"

If you want to store it rounded, you can use

>> (2.3465*100).round / 100.0
=> 2.35
6
  • 2
    Thanks. I didn't realize sprintf would take care of rounding for me. sprintf '%.2f', 2.3465 also works. Apr 7, 2012 at 17:01
  • 73
    value.round(2) is better than this solution
    – TheOneTeam
    Dec 5, 2013 at 3:22
  • 12
    Keep in mind that 2.3000.round(2) => 2.3 and sprintf '%.2f', 2.300 => 2.30. In my opinion this is a flaw in round(), or it should have an option to preserve trailing zeros.
    – Excalibur
    Feb 11, 2014 at 17:06
  • 15
    @Excalibur 2.3000.round(2) is a number, not a string. There is no way that the number 2.3 is different from 2.30, so there is no way to have an option to preserve trailing zeros. You could make your own class of numbers_with_significance but then we already have strings. Apr 27, 2014 at 16:54
  • 8
    Note that although this does work for two decimal places, there's a flaw in '%.3f' % 1.2345 (3 decimal places, not 2), however!! Same for sprintf as well. Beware. That will return => 1.234 not => 1.235 as most would expect (iow, after the 2nd decimal, sprintf rounds 5 down and only rounds a 6 up). That's why Kit Ho's comment above has 25+ upvotes. Safer to use, '%.3f' % 1.2345.round(3) so the number is properly rounded by .round first, then formatted (with trailing zeros, if need be).
    – likethesky
    Dec 9, 2016 at 22:48
12

you can use this for rounding to a precison..

//to_f is for float

salary= 2921.9121
puts salary.to_f.round(2) // to 2 decimal place                   

puts salary.to_f.round() // to 3 decimal place          
6

You can add a method in Float Class, I learnt this from stackoverflow:

class Float
    def precision(p)
        # Make sure the precision level is actually an integer and > 0
        raise ArgumentError, "#{p} is an invalid precision level. Valid ranges are integers > 0." unless p.class == Fixnum or p < 0
        # Special case for 0 precision so it returns a Fixnum and thus doesn't have a trailing .0
        return self.round if p == 0
        # Standard case  
        return (self * 10**p).round.to_f / 10**p
    end
end
0
4

You can also provide a negative number as an argument to the round method to round to the nearest multiple of 10, 100 and so on.

# Round to the nearest multiple of 10. 
12.3453.round(-1)       # Output: 10

# Round to the nearest multiple of 100. 
124.3453.round(-2)      # Output: 100
3

what about (2.3465*100).round()/100.0?

0
2
def rounding(float,precision)
    return ((float * 10**precision).round.to_f) / (10**precision)
end
1

If you just need to display it, I would use the number_with_precision helper. If you need it somewhere else I would use, as Steve Weet pointed, the round method

1
  • 1
    Note that number_with_precision is Rails-only method.
    – Smar
    Jul 15, 2015 at 11:39
0

For ruby 1.8.7 you could add the following to your code:

class Float
    alias oldround:round
    def round(precision = nil)
        if precision.nil?
            return self
        else
            return ((self * 10**precision).oldround.to_f) / (10**precision)
        end 
    end 
end

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