9

Consider the following C++11 code:

#include <type_traits>

struct bar
{
    virtual void do_bar() const {}
};

struct foo
{
    std::aligned_storage<sizeof(bar),alignof(bar)>::type m_storage;
};

bar is not standard layout because of the virtual function do_bar(). However, foo is standard layout as the type provided by std::aligned_storage is a POD type and foo satisfies all the other requirements for standard layout types.

What happens then when I use the m_storage storage with placement new to construct an instance of bar? E.g.,

foo f;
::new(static_cast<void *>(&f.m_storage)) bar();

Is this legal? Can I use this to cheat my way around restrictions about standard layout types?

5
  • 1
    "Can I use this to cheat my way around restrictions about standard layout types?" What are you referring to? I.e. why do you want/need foo to be standard-layout?
    – dyp
    Dec 12 '13 at 18:39
  • @DyP: see for instance the special ruling regarding unions of standard-layout classes sharing a common initial sequence in 9.2.
    – bluescarni
    Dec 12 '13 at 19:10
  • Hmm interesting. For example: struct foo2{ aligned_storage<..>::type m_storage; int i; }; union u{ foo2 m0; foo m1; }; The restriction on standard-layout types having no non-static data members of non-standard-layout type seems to be relevant for the contiguity of the occupied storage [intro.object]/5, which is irrelevant here (m_storage does occupy contiguous storage, as it itself is standard-layout).
    – dyp
    Dec 12 '13 at 19:53
  • From what I can tell this results in something like foo being a standard layout type with implementation defined size and alignment. It also in no way allows standard-layout-like access to bar. In short, it should fit some, but not all uses of standard layout... Probably. Dec 20 '13 at 4:49
  • If your design isn't screwed up then you will need placement new pretty much rarely (in some low level libs: containers, reflection/serialization, ...) and even in those cases it isn't alignment that will stand in your way. In my opinion don't waste your time on thinking about how to write code that you should never write... :-) Mar 4 '14 at 0:13
1

Here's your code again:

struct bar {
    virtual void do_bar() const {}
};

struct foo {
    std::aligned_storage<sizeof(bar), alignof(bar)>::type m_storage;
};

This is fine. struct foo is a standard-layout type, and, given an instance foo myFoo, you can construct an object of type bar into myFoo.m_storage.

However, this is completely pointless from the compiler's POV, so why bother with it? As @dyp wisely said in the comments, "Why do you want foo to be standard-layout?"

You handwaved something about unions. Well, that's fine. You can write this:

union DoesntWork {
    bar b;    // compiler error in C++11 due to non-standard-layout type
    int i;
};

union DoesWork {
    foo f;    // works fine in C++11, of course
    int i;
};

However, equally obviously, you cannot expect this to work:

struct car {
    int initialsequence;
};
struct bar {
    int initialsequence;
    virtual void do_bar() const {}
};
struct foo {
    std::aligned_storage<sizeof(bar), alignof(bar)>::type m_storage;
    bar& asBar() { return *reinterpret_cast<bar*>(&m_storage); }
};

union JustSilly {
    foo f;
    car c;
} js;
assert(&js.c.initialsequence ==         // Fails, because no matter how many
       &js.f.asBar().initialsequence);  // casts you add, bar still has a vptr!

In other words, you're free to lie to the compiler (via type-punning and reinterpret_cast), but that doesn't make your lies true. ;)

See also: XY problem.

0

Tried in OSX's XCode C++11 compiler option, and seems to work for me. Of course, you probably want to do "::new(static_cast(&f.m_storage)) bar();" in foo's constructor and invoke its destructor in foo's destructor.

0

When working with aligned quantities

1) It is advisable to specify alignment for the class or struct using declspec(align(16)) or __attribute((aligned(16))). I have encounter some errors when enabling optimization using VS2010, when I didn't do this.

2) I usually avoid overloading new and use the placement operator like you suggest, e.g.

#include <new> // Remember this otherwise the placement operator is not defined
SomeClass* c = (SomeClass*) _mm_malloc(sizeof(SomeClass),16);
new c SomeClass(); // This is perfectly legal
// Some work
_mm_free(c);

3) A good rules of thumb is to place aligned quantities at the start of your struct or class. This way the compiler won't do zero-padding in between members and warn about this.

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